Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSmith Wesson
IN THE NEWS

Smith Wesson

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 13, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Smith & Wesson, America's largest manufacturer of handguns, has issued a "clarification" of its landmark pact with the federal government that would effectively eviscerate many of the gun controls trumpeted by the Clinton administration. Smith & Wesson's interpretation -- posted quietly on its Web site -- has forced the company back into talks with the administration that could lead to a protracted court battle. Administration officials dismissed Smith & Wesson's interpretation as more of a public relations gambit than a genuine change of heart but said they would be willing to go to court to force Smith & Wesson into compliance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 28, 2003
A former employee of Argenbright Security Inc. was sentenced yesterday to three years in prison for her role in the importation and sale of stolen firearms, the Maryland attorney general's office announced. Baltimore Circuit Judge Alfred Nance initially imposed a 10-year term for Cheryl Kimberly Shorter, but suspended seven years. He also ordered three years' probation after her release and fined her $3,000. Shorter, 29, of the 3600 block of Ninth St. in Brooklyn was convicted with her former boyfriend, C'Don Chezere Thompson, 21, also a former Argenbright Security employee who lives in Brooklyn, and Evelyn Renee Alston, 29, of Stevensville on charges stemming from the possession and sale of firearms stolen from Argenbright in Arlington, Va. In May, Anne Arundel County police discovered Shorter and Alston trying to sell Smith & Wesson .38-caliber revolvers.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 22, 2000
AMERICANS may get safer guns after all. Smith & Wesson's agreement last week to settle lawsuits with the federal government and 28 local governments not only protects the company -- it has also changed the debate over gun safety. The agreement -- which contains many of the reforms President Clinton has asked Congress to approve -- sidesteps the congressional logjam. Smith & Wesson agreed to restrictions such as background checks at gun shows and designing guns so children can't fire them.
NEWS
January 6, 2001
WHEN A STORE has been in business for 96 years, it acquires a reputation. Baltimore Gunsmith Co. surely has: Twenty percent of the firearms seized in city crimes over the past nine years -- a total of more than 1,000 weapons -- were bought at the upper Fells Point shop. Despite this link, city and federal officials failed for years in their efforts to close down this gun supplier for criminals. That's why the recent ruling of U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz is so important: He denied the gun store owners' appeal for a license.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2000
Gov. Parris N. Glendening claimed vindication yesterday after the Clinton administration and Smith & Wesson announced a settlement that closely tracks some of the provisions of his gun safety initiative. The governor wasted little time in using the deal to ratchet up pressure on the General Assembly to pass his "smart guns" legislation, which has been bottled up in a state Senate committee. At an afternoon news conference, Glendening said the settlement refuted opponents' claims that the technology called for in his bill is not available.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
As the National Rifle Association launched an attack on his gun-lock bill, Gov. Parris N. Glendening confidently predicted yesterday the landmark legislation will pass -- and said he's trading public money for votes to make sure that happens. Glendening said he was using his control of pork-barrel spending to ensure victory for his gun-safety legislation, which is scheduled for a critical House committee vote today. "I will use the full resources of this office to save the lives of our children," the governor said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 18, 2000
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton announced a landmark agreement with the nation's largest gun manufacturer yesterday that could fundamentally change the way guns are designed, manufactured, marketed and sold throughout the country. Under the agreement, the federal government will lift a threatened lawsuit against firearms giant Smith & Wesson, and at least 24 state and local governments will drop their class-action lawsuits against the company. In exchange, the company will incorporate sophisticated new safety devices in Smith & Wesson guns, require mandatory background checks at gun shows and implement stringent limits in the marketing and sales of handguns.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1999
Saying they want reform, not money, NAACP leaders filed a lawsuit yesterday demanding that nearly 100 gun manufacturers change the way they do business.The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn, N.Y., is hotly contested by America's powerful gun lobby because the changes would limit handgun sales and prohibit distributors from selling certain weapons to gun show dealers.Large firearms manufacturers such as Smith & Wesson, Remington and Glock Inc. are accused in the lawsuit of contributing, through negligence, to handgun-related deaths.
NEWS
March 5, 1996
County police arrested four Baltimore men and a 17-year-old girl Saturday and seized more than $800, in cash, two loaded handguns and crack cocaine from their car.Alvin T. Bunn, 21, of the 900 block of Kevin Ave.; Cornelius L. Clark, 18, of the 2100 block of Leonard Ave.; Anthony M. Watson, 22, of the 2100 block of Mount Holly St.; and Shawn C. Winn, 24, of the 2100 block of Garrison Blvd. were charged with possession of crack cocaine and possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1998
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. -- Mark Robinson, 14, wants to be a police officer with a canine corps one day. Teen-age brothers Vince and Michael Alfano enjoyed shooting guns at a county fair and decided to learn more. Postal worker Charles Steele signed up his 13-year-old son Christopher so that "the boy can defend himself or the house, if necessary."All four youngsters are enrolled in Little Shots, the popular children's shooting program at the new National Firearms Training Center here.What makes Little Shots noteworthy is not only the youth of the marksmen but also the identity of their instructors: employees of Smith & Wesson, America's leading handgun manufacturer.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 13, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Smith & Wesson, America's largest manufacturer of handguns, has issued a "clarification" of its landmark pact with the federal government that would effectively eviscerate many of the gun controls trumpeted by the Clinton administration. Smith & Wesson's interpretation -- posted quietly on its Web site -- has forced the company back into talks with the administration that could lead to a protracted court battle. Administration officials dismissed Smith & Wesson's interpretation as more of a public relations gambit than a genuine change of heart but said they would be willing to go to court to force Smith & Wesson into compliance.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
As the National Rifle Association launched an attack on his gun-lock bill, Gov. Parris N. Glendening confidently predicted yesterday the landmark legislation will pass -- and said he's trading public money for votes to make sure that happens. Glendening said he was using his control of pork-barrel spending to ensure victory for his gun-safety legislation, which is scheduled for a critical House committee vote today. "I will use the full resources of this office to save the lives of our children," the governor said.
NEWS
March 25, 2000
State must lead on control I am writing in support of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's Gun Safety Act of 2000. Several recent developments validate and support the need for that bill. The major development was the deal President Clinton struck with Smith & Wesson. This pact amazingly mirrored the features of the governor's bill, even down to the exact timetable for built-in trigger locks and personalized guns. Republican Gov. George Pataki of New York has also recently proposed a strong gun control bill.
NEWS
March 22, 2000
AMERICANS may get safer guns after all. Smith & Wesson's agreement last week to settle lawsuits with the federal government and 28 local governments not only protects the company -- it has also changed the debate over gun safety. The agreement -- which contains many of the reforms President Clinton has asked Congress to approve -- sidesteps the congressional logjam. Smith & Wesson agreed to restrictions such as background checks at gun shows and designing guns so children can't fire them.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 18, 2000
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton announced a landmark agreement with the nation's largest gun manufacturer yesterday that could fundamentally change the way guns are designed, manufactured, marketed and sold throughout the country. Under the agreement, the federal government will lift a threatened lawsuit against firearms giant Smith & Wesson, and at least 24 state and local governments will drop their class-action lawsuits against the company. In exchange, the company will incorporate sophisticated new safety devices in Smith & Wesson guns, require mandatory background checks at gun shows and implement stringent limits in the marketing and sales of handguns.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2000
Gov. Parris N. Glendening claimed vindication yesterday after the Clinton administration and Smith & Wesson announced a settlement that closely tracks some of the provisions of his gun safety initiative. The governor wasted little time in using the deal to ratchet up pressure on the General Assembly to pass his "smart guns" legislation, which has been bottled up in a state Senate committee. At an afternoon news conference, Glendening said the settlement refuted opponents' claims that the technology called for in his bill is not available.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1999
Howard County prosecutors tried yesterday to link the shooting of a teen-ager in Harper's Choice last year to an impression left by a handgun in the defendant's car.That shooting was the first of two in September that rocked Harper's Choice. Police quickly found a suspect, charging Maurice Green, 22, with attempted first-degree murder stemming from the shooting of Raymond T. Lawson and robbery on Sept. 20. Green's trial began Monday.Prosecutors apparently lack other physical evidence directly linking Green to the crime; a Howard County crime scene technician testified yesterday that police did not find any shell casings, fingerprints or other evidence to link Green to the scene.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | March 8, 2000
Police Blotter is a sampling of crimes in Baltimore City and Baltimore County. Baltimore City Southern District Shooting: A man, 21, was in the 1100 block of S. Monroe St. about 9 p.m. yesterday when he saw two men walking toward him. Fearing he would be robbed, he turned and walked away. One of the men shot him in the buttocks with a handgun. The victim was treated at Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Northern District Assault: A man, 45, was in the 2100 block of Huntingdon Ave. about 12: 30 a.m. yesterday when he saw another man trying to break into a car and moved to intervene.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | March 8, 2000
Police Blotter is a sampling of crimes in Baltimore City and Baltimore County. Baltimore City Southern District Shooting: A man, 21, was in the 1100 block of S. Monroe St. about 9 p.m. yesterday when he saw two men walking toward him. Fearing he would be robbed, he turned and walked away. One of the men shot him in the buttocks with a handgun. The victim was treated at Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Northern District Assault: A man, 45, was in the 2100 block of Huntingdon Ave. about 12: 30 a.m. yesterday when he saw another man trying to break into a car and moved to intervene.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.