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NEWS
May 20, 2013
Having been raised in Baltimore, and lived in larger cities, it was with trepidation that I moved to the Eastern Shore many years ago. I have learned to appreciate the values, the culture and the hard work of the farmers and watermen who live here. Logically speaking, your opinion makes sense ("Smith Island denial," May 17). Erosion on Smith Island is a problem and is here to stay. However, if these people who care so much for their island and their way of life prefer to live on the island, then let them.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | December 3, 2013
When talking about the top cornerbacks in the NFL this season, the name of Baltimore's Jimmy Smith probably doesn't get mentioned unless that conversation takes place within the 410 and 443 area codes. But after two forgettable seasons to start his NFL career and a pair of poor performances in the first month of 2013, Smith has been one of the NFL's stingiest cornerbacks over the past couple of months. Since the Week 6 loss to the Green Bay Packers, when Smith got his lone interception of the season by picking off star quarterback Aaron Rodgers, Smith has been targeted 31 times in seven games.
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NEWS
July 17, 2013
The opinions expressed by letter writer Craig Piette ("Time to cut bait on Smith Island," July 11) reflect a lack of knowledge of the subject matter. It also wasn't clear whether he visited Ewell or Rhodes Point during his time on Smith Island or only Tylerton. Smith Island is made up of all three communities, with Ewell having twice the full-time population of either Tylerton or Rhodes Point. There is more to Smith Island than any one community represents. Several new businesses were started in Ewell over the past three years.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 25, 2013
Millions in federal funds are to be spent in Maryland to help protect Smith Island, Crisfield and other coastal communities from devastating flooding like that caused by last year's Superstorm Sandy. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell announced Thursday her department would dole out $162 million for 45 restoration and research projects to help Atlantic coast communities fend off storm surges and rising sea level.  The restoration projects focus on shielding marsh and wetlands at wildlife refuges, but studies are to be funded that would improve flooding and storm resilience of coastal communiites as well.
NEWS
July 11, 2013
A recent commentator speculated about whether Smith Island can be rescued from oblivion ("Smith Island can be saved," July 7). I ask, why bother? For the 50 years I've lived in Maryland, I've heard Smith Island this, Smith Island that. I really believed there was something to Smith Island. Boy, was I wrong! During a recent environmental professional institute, I visited Tylerton, one of the communities on the group of islands that constitute Smith Island. With all due respect to the lovely folks with whom I interacted, why any tax dollars would be spent saving a swamp with 50 or so residents is beyond me. Approximately half the homes are shacks, boarded up and seemingly abandoned.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
Tim Wheeler 's report on the future of Smith Island and the state's idea to buy residents out so they may relocate tells a heartbreaking story of people whose attachment to the island goes back many years, 400 years in some cases ("Smith Islanders debating a state buyout proposal," May 13). If the buyout is taken by just some residents, it may make life untenable on the island for those who want to stay. They have organized a letter-writing campaign to fight the buyout idea. It is very important to fight climate change on the local level.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2013
Superstorm Sandy barely laid a glove on Smith Island last fall, to hear residents tell it. Though storm-driven flooding damaged hundreds of homes in Crisfield and the rest of Somerset County, only a couple islanders got any water in their homes from the surging Chesapeake Bay. Yet with the island slowly shrinking and sinking into the bay, the state is considering using $2 million of the federal storm recovery aid it's received so far to buy out...
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
State officials have decided to forge ahead with a controversial offer to buy out about 10 homeowners on Smith Island as part of a plan for helping Somerset County recover from superstorm Sandy. The Department of Housing and Community Development earmarked $1 million for buyouts on the island, out of $8.6 million in federal aid the county is to receive to help businesses and residents repair and rebuild after the fall storm. Many islanders had objected to the buyout, saying they felt it unfairly targeted Smith residents for relocation when other coastal areas on the mainland suffered more damage and are arguably more vulnerable to future storms.
NEWS
By Christy Goodman and The Washington Post | December 1, 2009
In one corner of the bare-bones bakery, Louise Clayton, 62, hushed a visitor as she carefully counted out scoops of cocoa for the fudge icing she was making. Missy Tyler, 49, measured out batter and poured it into a cake tin. She did it nine more times before popping the 10 tins into the oven. Donna Smith, 45, placed one cooled thin layer before her and covered it with Clayton's icing. She added layers and icing nine more times until an authentic Smith Island cake sat in front of her. The barely five-month-old Smith Island Baking Co. has 10 employees making Maryland's official state dessert and shipping it across the country.
NEWS
April 19, 1991
Smith Island is suffering a disease affecting many other island communities: erosion. When the power of the wind and waves hits, residents of Rhodes Point look out their windows to see whitecaps where there used to be sand. And they worry about their way of life.This community, dating from 1657, is looking for help from the Maryland Port Administration, which must dispose of 100 cubic yards of "spoil" dredged from Baltimore shipping channels over the next 20 years. That material, much of it clean, has to go somewhere, and present sites are fast filling.
NEWS
August 20, 2013
Thank you for Carol Browner's commentary appreciating Gov. Martin O'Malley's climate change efforts ("The importance of Maryland's leadership on climate change," Aug. 18). However, she didn't mention that Governor O'Malley could also reach out to Maryland's congressional delegation encouraging them to support congressional legislation to lower emissions and stabilize the climate. In particular, the he could encourage Rep. Andy Harris to meet with others in the delegation to fashion a bipartisan climate change bill.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
The opinions expressed by letter writer Craig Piette ("Time to cut bait on Smith Island," July 11) reflect a lack of knowledge of the subject matter. It also wasn't clear whether he visited Ewell or Rhodes Point during his time on Smith Island or only Tylerton. Smith Island is made up of all three communities, with Ewell having twice the full-time population of either Tylerton or Rhodes Point. There is more to Smith Island than any one community represents. Several new businesses were started in Ewell over the past three years.
NEWS
July 11, 2013
A recent commentator speculated about whether Smith Island can be rescued from oblivion ("Smith Island can be saved," July 7). I ask, why bother? For the 50 years I've lived in Maryland, I've heard Smith Island this, Smith Island that. I really believed there was something to Smith Island. Boy, was I wrong! During a recent environmental professional institute, I visited Tylerton, one of the communities on the group of islands that constitute Smith Island. With all due respect to the lovely folks with whom I interacted, why any tax dollars would be spent saving a swamp with 50 or so residents is beyond me. Approximately half the homes are shacks, boarded up and seemingly abandoned.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
I don't begrudge Smith Islanders trying to preserve their way of life in their appeal to your readership for the public to fund, in the words of Smith Island United, "the cost of these huge projects" ("Demise of Smith Island is far from inevitable," July 7). And why not if the state only has to pony up 25 percent on the project as was claimed? But I question whether that 75/25 federal and state contribution still holds true. I also question whether it will do any good, given some of the maps I've seen on sea levels rises in the Chesapeake Bay region.
NEWS
By Eddie Somers and Duke Marshall | July 7, 2013
Some believe it is inevitable that Smith Island will be lost to erosion and rising sea levels. We disagree. As members of Smith Island United, a group formed to preserve Smith Island, we believe the government has pretty much eliminated the word ""inevitable"" when it comes to the future of Chesapeake Bay islands. Hart Miller and Poplar islands in the upper bay were basically ""created"" by the government from open bay waters. These are very big projects. Poplar Island, off Tilghman Island, started in 1998 with a 35,000 foot stone dike, which was then filled with dredged spoils and is currently over 1,000 acres of high land and marsh.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
State officials have decided to forge ahead with a controversial offer to buy out about 10 homeowners on Smith Island as part of a plan for helping Somerset County recover from superstorm Sandy. The Department of Housing and Community Development earmarked $1 million for buyouts on the island, out of $8.6 million in federal aid the county is to receive to help businesses and residents repair and rebuild after the fall storm. Many islanders had objected to the buyout, saying they felt it unfairly targeted Smith residents for relocation when other coastal areas on the mainland suffered more damage and are arguably more vulnerable to future storms.
NEWS
May 20, 2013
Having been raised in Baltimore, and lived in larger cities, it was with trepidation that I moved to the Eastern Shore many years ago. I have learned to appreciate the values, the culture and the hard work of the farmers and watermen who live here. Logically speaking, your opinion makes sense ("Smith Island denial," May 17). Erosion on Smith Island is a problem and is here to stay. However, if these people who care so much for their island and their way of life prefer to live on the island, then let them.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
Even the most jaded observer must acknowledge there's something admirable about the desire of so many living on Smith Island to see their community survive and prosper. Residents of this marshy (and shrinking in both population and real estate) archipelago on the lower Eastern Shore have had to overcome much in recent years, particularly as their chief means of livelihood, harvesting the seafood bounty of the Chesapeake Bay, has declined. But it's one thing to admire the hard work, independence and faith of Smith Island's residents - who number a mere 276, according to the 2010 Census - and it's another to deny the reality of their circumstances.
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