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NEWS
March 27, 1992
Colleen Sue Smiley-Owendoff, assistant professor of psychology at the Naval Academy since 1987, died Sunday of cancer at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda. She was 40 and lived in Cape St. Claire.Services for Dr. Smiley-Owendoff were being held today in the chapel at the academy.Graveside services will be held at 1 p.m. tomorrow at the Oakland (Md.) Memorial Gardens.Born at Great Lakes, Ill., the former Colleen Sue Smiley was reared in Atlanta.Dr. Smiley-Owendoff was active as a volunteer in the Protestant Chapel program at the Naval Academy, where she was a lay reader, Communion server and member of the Chapel Council, the Officers' Christian Fellowship and the Midshipman Ministry Team.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
President Barack Obama's appearance Wednesday night on Jay Leno's "Tonight Show" was a long, free, smiley-face ride through a land of pattycake questions teed up one after another to make the guest look good and mock his Republican opponent. Will someone tell me why more people aren't concerned about entertainment shows with audiences measured in the millions being used this way for what is essentially propaganda? I say "long" because Obama didn't just "drop by" to chat with Jay, as they say in the phony-speak of TV Land, he was pretty much the whole show.
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NEWS
August 28, 2005
On Friday, August 19, 2005, RACHEL E. SMILEY, beloved wife of James S. Smiley, Sr. Also survived by her stepchildren, grandchildren, brothers and their families. A memorial service will be held at the Back River United Methodist Church, 544 Back River Neck Road, Essex on Wednesday, August 31 at 1 P.M. Condolences can be offered to the family starting at 12:30 P.M. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Back River United Methodist Church.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
Baltimore looks like it has a new record to smile about. For 11 minutes and 32 seconds, 261 people stood at the Maryland Science Center plaza Thursday to form what organizers said was the world's largest smiley face as part of the launch of a new city tourism campaign. The orange and black smiley face that resembled a lumpy jack-o-lantern grinned up at members of the media gathered on the roof of the science center as a police helicopter circled above. It appeared to be enough to earn the Guinness World Records title for the largest human smiley face.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | March 28, 2001
The head of Black Entertainment Television, buffeted by criticism, took to his network's airwaves late Monday in a remarkable hour-long program to say he had fired popular talk show host Tavis Smiley because he sold an interview to ABC News. "There was not enough mutual business respect," said BET founder and CEO Robert L. Johnson, in response to one of many skeptical questioners. "There's no reason why we should force a relationship." Johnson's appearance was intended to counter the impression that the move was prompted by BET's new corporate parent, Viacom.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 23, 2007
What makes Tavis Smiley run? That question has intrigued me ever since I met him 11 years ago in Los Angeles. He was 31 and a failed City Council candidate but a popular radio commentator, often the last refuge of failed politicians. Back then, he had just written a book of commentary and Time magazine had named him one of "50 Young Americans to Watch." Yet he was seeking my advice. "How do you do it?" he asked, wondering how I juggled a newspaper column, TV appearances, radio commentaries, my family and my sanity.
SPORTS
March 22, 1992
Pittsburgh Pirates manager Jim Leyland -- who watched John Smiley get traded and Bill Landrum get released -- confronted his bosses because he felt they were making moves without his input.It especially hurt when Smiley -- a popular 20-game winner -- was dealt Tuesday to the Minnesota Twins."It hurt me that I wasn't involved, but that's the way it is," said Leyland, who met Friday with general manager Ted Simmons and Mark Sauer, the team president.Simmons wouldn't comment on the meeting, saying it was a private matter.
SPORTS
April 13, 1991
CHICAGO -- John Smiley didn't expect many runs. As it turned out, he didn't need them.Smiley gave up four hits and one run in eight innings as the Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Chicago Cubs, 3-1, yesterday. Last vTC year, in Smiley's 10 losses the Pirates managed only 1.6 runs a game.Andy Van Slyke scored two of Pittsburgh's runs and Bobby Bonilla and Jay Bell each singled home a run off loser Shawn Boskie. Van Slyke was hit by a pitch in the fourth and came around on a single by Bonilla and a pair of infield outs.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 3, 1995
Washington -- With "Moo," her first novel since the Pulitzer Prize-winning "A Thousand Acres," firmly on the best-seller lists, Jane Smiley can afford to be light-hearted about the critical reception it has received. She points out, for instance, that many critics have appreciated "Moo," a comic novel released last month about a large, agriculturally oriented Iowa university not unlike Iowa State University, where she teaches.Some people were not amused.One reviewer, Richard Eder of the Los Angeles Times, wrote: "If neither satire nor seriousness entirely work, it is because the author's hand grows heavy . . ."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | May 3, 1992
No doubt, left-hander John Smiley considered it a defining moment in his baseball career when he recorded his 20th victory of the 1991 season. Right-hander Scott Erickson probably felt the same way. But both of them have to be wondering if it was a blessing or a curse.Neither has won a game since.Smiley, who was 20-8 for the National League East champion Pittsburgh Pirates, was hammered by the Atlanta Braves in two playoff starts before he was traded to the Minnesota Twins during spring training.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
The crime lab technician, Evana Hebb, fingerprinted India Mouton, a 10th-grader from Dunbar High. All five fingers on her right hand rubbed in black ink and pressed hard onto a white sheet of paper in a garage at the headquarters of the Baltimore Police Department. It's part of a monthlong lesson for teenagers at city recreation centers on the criminal justice system - they are following a mock murder from corpse to trial - but for this 15-year-old student, it's the start of what she hopes will be a career as a scientist investigating crime.
FEATURES
By Mary McNamara | July 21, 2008
HOLLYWOOD - It's not often a show about modern "dating" brings to mind the quiz show scandals of the 1950s, but watching Bravo's new reality series Date My Ex, which begins tonight, I found myself inexplicably flashing back to Ralph Fiennes as scholar turned disgraced contestant Charles Van Doren in Quiz Show. No doubt this was, in part, a subconscious attempt to remain awake, to relieve the utter tedium of Date My Ex, in which Jo De La Rosa, formerly of The Real Housewives of Orange County, engages in an upscale dating game with - oh, what will they think of next?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | September 26, 2007
When his parents refused to send him to college, Tavis Smiley showed up at Indiana University anyway, eventually talking his way into a place in class and a work-study program to help pay for it. Denied an internship in the office of then-Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, he pleaded his case in what he acknowledges was a "tear-stained" letter to the mayor - and got his internship. Fired from his job as interview-show host on BET, he quickly turned around and landed programs on PBS, NPR and a handful of other media outlets, extending both his reach and influence.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | September 20, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Next week's Republican presidential debate in Baltimore, which has been shunned by the party's leading contenders, is getting an added starter: Alan L. Keyes. The conservative activist, a former U.S. Senate candidate in Maryland and Illinois who said last week that he is running for president again, is "definitely participating," said a campaign spokeswoman, Carla Michele. Keyes, 56, would be the lone African-American candidate at the Morgan State University forum, which will focus on issues of importance to minority voters.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | September 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Former Sen. Fred Thompson left supporters hanging for months before joining the presidential contest. Now he's got them wondering when he'll make his debate debut. The next Republican debate is Sept. 27 in Baltimore, but Thompson's participation appears to be in doubt, in spite of an announcement yesterday from the event's organizers that he would be there. At least three other Republican contenders, including front-runners Rudolph W. Giuliani and Mitt Romney, have balked at attending.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 23, 2007
What makes Tavis Smiley run? That question has intrigued me ever since I met him 11 years ago in Los Angeles. He was 31 and a failed City Council candidate but a popular radio commentator, often the last refuge of failed politicians. Back then, he had just written a book of commentary and Time magazine had named him one of "50 Young Americans to Watch." Yet he was seeking my advice. "How do you do it?" he asked, wondering how I juggled a newspaper column, TV appearances, radio commentaries, my family and my sanity.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
A strong community doesn't need a leader, talk-show host and author Tavis Smiley has said. It just needs everyday people who want to make a change. More than 1,200 of those everyday people, including babies and octogenarians, poured into Sharon Baptist Church in Baltimore yesterday to hear Smiley speak and to participate in a town hall meeting that was part sermon, part rally, part therapy and part call to action to African-Americans. The crowd, which filled the sanctuary to capacity and then some, read aloud in unison, yelled out, repeatedly stood to clap, held hands and silently bowed their heads.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | January 9, 2002
Tavis Smiley has launched his new program on National Public Radio in style. Smiley's debut show Monday featured a lengthy interview with Cornel West, the distinguished Harvard University professor who is in a public tangle with the university's new president. After Harvard President Lawrence Summers' pointed inquiries about West's political activities, West and several of his colleagues issued a statement saying they would consider leaving the Cambridge, Mass., campus. But Smiley was the first to interview West, and his remarks were excerpted on NPR's main newscasts and quoted widely elsewhere.
BUSINESS
By ABIGAIL GOLDMAN and ABIGAIL GOLDMAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 9, 2006
For decades, the yellow happy-face symbol has encouraged millions to smile. The smiley face and "have a nice day" helped to define the '70s. With two dots and a pencil stroke, schoolchildren have brightened handwritten messages by filling in their O's with mini-smileys. But now a bitter legal battle over smiley could be enough to make the happy little symbol frown. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., which uses a yellow happy face to try to put its shoppers in a carefree mood, is saying that it has exclusive rights to the familiar image, at least among retail department stores.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
A strong community doesn't need a leader, talk-show host and author Tavis Smiley has said. It just needs everyday people who want to make a change. More than 1,200 of those everyday people, including babies and octogenarians, poured into Sharon Baptist Church in Baltimore yesterday to hear Smiley speak and to participate in a town hall meeting that was part sermon, part rally, part therapy and part call to action to African-Americans. The crowd, which filled the sanctuary to capacity and then some, read aloud in unison, yelled out, repeatedly stood to clap, held hands and silently bowed their heads.
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