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By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
When pioneering alt-rockers Smashing Pumpkins announced an intimate club date at Rams Head Live, the response from fans was swift. The 1,400 tickets for Monday's show sold out in five minutes, according to Sarah Sample, the venue's marketing director. The Smashing Pumpkins are "something a lot of us grew up with," Sample said. "They fit into the soundtrack of your life. It's a huge opportunity to see them live." Though frontman Billy Corgan is the only original member in this incarnation, he has long been the heart and soul of the Pumpkins.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
It used to be that Halloween meant hay rides, haunted houses and corn mazes. But the past few years have seen the growth of a new harvest tradition — projectile pumpkins. Across the country, families are flocking to roadside farms every autumn to launch orange gourds at ungodly speeds at targets planted in a field hundreds of feet away and watch them go splat. "There's something about firing a pumpkin at 75 miles an hour that's very transporting," says Karen Connelly, 47, of Catonsville.
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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | March 23, 2007
When the Virgin Festival returns this August to Pimlico Race Course, it will bring with it the hottest touring act of the year - the Police - along with the highly successful hip-hop group the Beastie Boys and acclaimed alt-rockers Smashing Pumpkins. The festival, sponsored by Virgin Mobile, comes back to Baltimore Aug. 4-5 with about 35 other indie rock and hip-hop acts and DJs on multiple stages. Tickets will go on sale in about three weeks. The festival made its Baltimore premiere last September with one day of music that included the Who and the Red Hot Chili Peppers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
When pioneering alt-rockers Smashing Pumpkins announced an intimate club date at Rams Head Live, the response from fans was swift. The 1,400 tickets for Monday's show sold out in five minutes, according to Sarah Sample, the venue's marketing director. The Smashing Pumpkins are "something a lot of us grew up with," Sample said. "They fit into the soundtrack of your life. It's a huge opportunity to see them live." Though frontman Billy Corgan is the only original member in this incarnation, he has long been the heart and soul of the Pumpkins.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 6, 1993
SIAMESE DREAMSmashing Pumpkins (Virgin 88267)Not all guitar noise is created equal. Some albums may make the mighty crunch of Marshall amps seem screechy and abrasive, but not "Siamese Dream." Even when the members of Smashing Pumpkins crank their amps to 11 (which is most of the time), the resultant roar is smooth and polished, keeping the instrumental clangor for crowding out the band's melodic flair. Add in the cool understatement of Billy Corgan's vocals, and the Pumpkins are left with a sound that's as tuneful as it is powerful -- and that's as true of full-throttle romps like "Cherub Rock" or "Geek U.S.A."
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 24, 1995
Ambition has largely gotten a bum rap in rock and roll. In other art forms, it's considered a sign of maturity to want to expand your horizons and attempt some sort of epic work, but in rock, such aspirations are often mocked, as if attempting anything larger-scale than a dozen three-minute pop songs per album was ridiculously pretentious.Over the years, of course, plenty of albums have proved that theory wrong. After the rambling brilliance of Bob Dylan's "Blonde on Blonde," the transformation genius of the Rolling Stones' "Exile on Main St.," and the ruminative psychodrama of Pink Floyd's "The Wall," you'd think people would accept the idea that artistic ambition doesn't necessarily equal egocentric self-delusion.
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By J.D. Considine and By J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 29, 2000
Smashing Pumpkins is one of the most successful bands in the alt-rock world, with a string of platinum albums to its credit and near-universal name recognition. By almost any standard, songwriter and frontman Billy Corgan has become a full-fledged rock star, with all the benefits stardom conveys. So when is he going to stop whining? It's one thing to act as if you bear the weight of the world when you're a self-obsessed teen-ager, quite another for an alleged adult to pull the same stunt.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 2, 1998
Unhappiness has been very good to Billy Corgan.When he first started to plumb the depths of adolescent despair with his band, the Smashing Pumpkins, his whining voice and roaring guitar struck a chord with alternarockers around the globe.Corgan clearly understood what it was like to be young, gifted and miserable, and expressed his disaffection quite vividly, beginning with the Pumpkins' 1991 EP, "Gish."Several platinum albums later, Corgan is no longer interested in the slash-and-yearn sound that put the Pumpkins on the map. After a string of alternahits that translated teen angst into mini-epics, Corgan has apparently sworn off grand gestures.
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September 11, 2008
Hometown Baltimore Members Elise Major, vocals, guitar and piano; Theron Day, bass; Evan Anderson, lead guitar; Alex Straiter, drums Founded 2008 Style rock Influenced by Led Zeppelin, Foo Fighters, Smashing Pumpkins, Radiohead Notable Until recently, Major fronted a band of the same name. It released a self-titled album in June. After it split up, she set out on her own and gathered a group of accomplished musicians to back her. Quotable "These guys are amazing," Major said.
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By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | July 26, 2007
Chemical Brothers -- We Are the Night (Astralwerks) Electronic big-beat dance-music geeks get old, too, so maybe that's what explains "The Salmon Dance," the novelty number on the Chemical Brothers' sixth album. It sounds like a demo for a drum-programmed children's record. But besides that foray into unabashed goofiness, the Bros are mostly up to their old excellent tricks of bass-drum-powered ravers such as "Saturate," and swooshy head trips such as "The Pills Won't Help You Now," a collaboration with Midlake.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2008
Hometown Baltimore Members Elise Major, vocals, guitar and piano; Theron Day, bass; Evan Anderson, lead guitar; Alex Straiter, drums Founded 2008 Style rock Influenced by Led Zeppelin, Foo Fighters, Smashing Pumpkins, Radiohead Notable Until recently, Major fronted a band of the same name. It released a self-titled album in June. After it split up, she set out on her own and gathered a group of accomplished musicians to back her. Quotable "These guys are amazing," Major said.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 6, 2007
Under threat of rain, about 32,000 fans reveled in the rock sounds of Velvet Revolver and the Smashing Pumpkins during Day 2 of the Virgin Festival. Yesterday came as a laid-back counterpoint to the nearly 42,000 concertgoers who flocked to Pimlico Race Course on Saturday, sweltering in near-100 degree temperatures to hear the Police. About 500 overheated fans had sought medical attention Saturday, but only about 200 needed treatment by 6 p.m. yesterday, and then for various ailments, , officials said.
NEWS
August 5, 2007
ROCK VIRGIN FESTIVAL / / Today. Pimlico Race Course, 5201 Park Heights Ave. $97.50-$250. 410-547-SEAT or ticketmaster.com. ....................... The two-day Virgin Festival continues this afternoon with such wide-ranging acts as local Wham City impresario / DJ Dan Deacon (noon), Moscow-born anti-folkie Regina Spektor (1:10 p.m.), Hasidic reggae rapper Matisyahu (1:30 p.m.), alt-pop act Spoon (2:25 p.m.), emo band Panic! at the Disco (3:45 p.m.) and the garage-punk Yeah Yeah Yeahs (5:15 p.m.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | July 26, 2007
Chemical Brothers -- We Are the Night (Astralwerks) Electronic big-beat dance-music geeks get old, too, so maybe that's what explains "The Salmon Dance," the novelty number on the Chemical Brothers' sixth album. It sounds like a demo for a drum-programmed children's record. But besides that foray into unabashed goofiness, the Bros are mostly up to their old excellent tricks of bass-drum-powered ravers such as "Saturate," and swooshy head trips such as "The Pills Won't Help You Now," a collaboration with Midlake.
FEATURES
By Glenn Gamboa and Glenn Gamboa,Newsday | July 10, 2007
Let Billy Corgan think whatever he wants. If he wants to call teaming with drummer Jimmy Chamberlin, who has played with Corgan in the group Zwan and on his solo album, a Smashing Pumpkins reunion, that's fine, as long as it produces albums as potent as Zeitgeist (Reprise). On their current tour, which brings them to Pimlico to headline the Virgin Festival on Aug. 5, the Pumpkins are pairing tunes from their past and present. While Zeitgeist, which is out today, may not be as genre-defining as Siamese Dream or as ambitious as Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness (both on Virgin Records)
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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | March 23, 2007
When the Virgin Festival returns this August to Pimlico Race Course, it will bring with it the hottest touring act of the year - the Police - along with the highly successful hip-hop group the Beastie Boys and acclaimed alt-rockers Smashing Pumpkins. The festival, sponsored by Virgin Mobile, comes back to Baltimore Aug. 4-5 with about 35 other indie rock and hip-hop acts and DJs on multiple stages. Tickets will go on sale in about three weeks. The festival made its Baltimore premiere last September with one day of music that included the Who and the Red Hot Chili Peppers.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 5, 1996
Despite what the ads promised, the real star of the 1996 MTV Video Music Awards wasn't big winner the Smashing Pumpkins, who won in virtually every category in which they were nominated, including Video of the Year. Nor was it a multiple winner such as Coolio (who took the Best Dance and Best Rap Video awards), Best Female Video winner Alanis Morissette, or Viewers' Choice winner Bush.It certainly wasn't one of the performers, despite what Neil Young, the Fugees or KISS did on stage. It wasn't even one of the celebrity presenters, despite the best efforts of Rosie O'Donnell, Dennis Rodman, Jenny McCarthy, host Dennis Miller or the MIR cosmonauts.
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By Glenn Gamboa and Glenn Gamboa,Newsday | July 10, 2007
Let Billy Corgan think whatever he wants. If he wants to call teaming with drummer Jimmy Chamberlin, who has played with Corgan in the group Zwan and on his solo album, a Smashing Pumpkins reunion, that's fine, as long as it produces albums as potent as Zeitgeist (Reprise). On their current tour, which brings them to Pimlico to headline the Virgin Festival on Aug. 5, the Pumpkins are pairing tunes from their past and present. While Zeitgeist, which is out today, may not be as genre-defining as Siamese Dream or as ambitious as Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness (both on Virgin Records)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 20, 2005
Marriage, love affair, suicide, back to the marriage, another affair, back to the marriage, another suicide. Welcome to the wonderfully entertaining world of Desperate Hausfraus. The action takes place in Vienna, early 20th century. At the center of the plot are the wives of two Austrian composers - one wife prone to entanglements with young men, the other willing to facilitate. This might sound like just another soap opera, but take a deeper look, as Raymond Coffer has done for the past four years, and you'll discover the makings of a fascinating, assumption-challenging new chapter in the history of modern music.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 29, 2000
AC/DC's Brian Johnson is a randy old buzzard. He's got only one thing on his mind, and it's double entendres. Skim through the titles on AC/DC's latest album, "Stiff Upper Lip" (EastWest 24942, arriving in stores today), and it's hard to miss the thrust of his lyrics. He "Can't Stand Still" because he wants his honey to "Give It Up." So he's telling her to "Come and Get It" before he heads into the "House of Jazz" and has a "Meltdown." You can stop snickering now, Beavis. Such pre-pubescent prurience would be forgivable if Johnson's nudge-wink lyrics were supported by head-banging guitar work.
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