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NEWS
June 28, 2010
The sentiments in the "Smart Meters? BGE must think we're dumb" letter of June 25 eliminate any doubt about whether BGE is right. Our present flat-rate metering of our highly-variable-cost electricity as demanded by that writer is what's dumb. Electricity costs vary by a factor of five to 20 over the hours of the day. Demanding to stick with flat rate metering penalizes the energy conscious consumer and rewards the clueless, wasteful, power hogging, stuck-in-last-century consumer. People with even a modicum of hope for the future and a sense of conservation and efficiency need and want smart meters so that we can use our energy intelligently and pay for it intelligently.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Peter DiPrinzio interviewed for jobs with big finance and consulting firms in his senior year of college in Vermont. Then he heard about a fledgling effort to send talented new graduates in a different direction - to jobs at startup companies in cities those grads might otherwise pass over. That program - like Teach For America but with an entrepreneurial twist - quickly hooked him. Now he's one of seven Venture for America "fellows" working in Baltimore, all of them about six months into two-year stints here.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 11, 2008
A third of the way through Smart People, I channeled Randy Newman's "Short People" and thought, "Smart people got no reason to live." In this sometimes droll but often just pleasantly literate movie, screenwriter Mark Jude Poirier's smart people -- depressed English prof Lawrence Wetherhold (Dennis Quaid) and his go-getter daughter Vanessa (Ellen Page) -- walk around Pittsburgh and the campus of Carnegie-Mellon "tellin' great big lies" like Newman's short ones, albeit mostly to themselves.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
Joseph Ganem says "our personal standard of living depends on the standard of living and well being of all. " ("It's all connected," Sept. 25). Mr. Ganem is an excellent physics teacher, and we should take note of what he says. So many people think they shouldn't listen to the "made-up" stuff scientists say. Who cares about helium? That's for balloons. I have benefited from teachers, and I am used to smart people taking a long time to say what they mean. Mr. Garnem is a physicist, as was my father, and they actually think about everyone, not just particles.
BUSINESS
By Evelyn Iritani and Evelyn Iritani,Los Angeles TImes | April 27, 2007
LOS ANGELES -- Welcome to Michael Milken's living room: a fire marshal's nightmare crammed full of people who have money or power, want money or power, or are willing to pay several thousand dollars to be near any and all of the above. At least 3,000 people were packed into this week's high-powered salon, which is not being held in Milken's Encino home (too small), but at his longtime haunt, the Beverly Hilton. They had come to hobnob with the junk-bond-king-turned-philanthropist and hear the musings of his marquee friends, people with names like Murdoch, Pickens, Turner and Broad (as in Rupert, T. Boone, Ted and Eli)
NEWS
November 19, 2007
The havoc on Wall Street following the collapse of the subprime-mortgage market boils down to a simple truth: For years, lots of very smart people took lots of very foolish risks. But behind that simple truth is a more surprising one: The financial whizzes made bad decisions in part because that's what they were paid to do. - James Surowiecki, The New Yorker
BUSINESS
May 20, 1991
Word DoctorHow good you talk, along with you're proved riting and speling abilitys, could urn you a raze and put you on the Rd. to unherd-of bizness sucsess.Not to mention helping you spot the mother lode of mistakes in the preceding sentence.So if your modifiers tend to dangle, and your infinitives split just when you need them, and terms like past participle and future perfect make you tense, call the Word Doctor."There are a lot of people out there who would like to know this stuff without being insulted or intimidated," said Barry Tarshis, president of the newly launched "Grammar for Smart People" seminars, aimed at improving the state of language in American business.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
Joseph Ganem says "our personal standard of living depends on the standard of living and well being of all. " ("It's all connected," Sept. 25). Mr. Ganem is an excellent physics teacher, and we should take note of what he says. So many people think they shouldn't listen to the "made-up" stuff scientists say. Who cares about helium? That's for balloons. I have benefited from teachers, and I am used to smart people taking a long time to say what they mean. Mr. Garnem is a physicist, as was my father, and they actually think about everyone, not just particles.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | July 28, 1992
You've probably heard the one about the dumb blonde, the nun, Dan Quayle.But what about the man? Any man.Men are the latest target for jokesters these days, under the heading "dumb men jokes."Q: "What's the difference between a man and E.T.?"A: "E.T. phoned home."No author or group has stepped up to take credit.This is not new, said Frederic Hayward, executive director of Men's Rights, an Oakland-based group. Mr. Hayward said he hasn't heard jokes about men referred to as "dumb-men jokes," although there are plenty of jokes about men out there.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Peter DiPrinzio interviewed for jobs with big finance and consulting firms in his senior year of college in Vermont. Then he heard about a fledgling effort to send talented new graduates in a different direction - to jobs at startup companies in cities those grads might otherwise pass over. That program - like Teach For America but with an entrepreneurial twist - quickly hooked him. Now he's one of seven Venture for America "fellows" working in Baltimore, all of them about six months into two-year stints here.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | January 6, 2013
Midseason used to be a time for networks to put on series that weren't good enough to make the fall lineup. The thinking was: The money has been spent to make these episodes, so let's try to get something out of them by plugging them for shows that have bombed. But thanks to cable and huge changes in the way that people access and watch TV, midseason is in many ways now the best season for TV viewing. This is especially true when it comes to drama, the genre that network television has by and large abandoned to cable, PBS and now Web operations like Netflix because it has been deemed too expensive and risky for efficient (read: cheap)
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | November 12, 2012
The Progressives won on Tuesday. I don't mean the people who voted Democrat who call themselves "progressive. " Though they won, too. I mean the Progressives who've been waging a century-long effort to transform our American-style government into a European-style state. The words "government" and "state" are often used interchangeably, but they are really different things. According to the Founders' vision, the people are sovereign and the government belongs to us. Under the European notion of the state, the people are creatures of the state, significant only as parts of the whole.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | October 25, 2012
Dolph Ziggler is ready for Hell in a Cell this Sunday, for many reasons. He's ready to steal the show, despite not having an official match on the card. He's ready to dispose of his Money in the Bank briefcase. He's ready to become World Heavyweight Champion. In fact, he is so confident that his time has come, he gave me an exclusive: his first comments as World Heavyweight champion ... before actually winning the title. "I would like to say that I owe a lot of people and that hard work paid off, that nice guys eventually get their shot, but I'm not going to say any of that stuff," boasted Ziggler in a phone interview Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2012
If you didn't see the debut of HBO's"Girls" Sunday night, here's some advice: Do whatever it takes to see it. Smart people are going to be talking and talking and talking some more about it for weeks. In 30 years of writing about television,  I cannot remember five other TV comedies that have blown me away the way this one did. I am sure I am only about the 50th reviewer to compare it to "The Mary Tyler Moore Show. " But I watched that one as a twentysomething baby boomer feeling for the first time that prime-time TV was speaking to and for my generation in a meaningful way. I am guessing "Girls" will have that same kind of electricity and cultural thunder for people who are in their 20s today.
NEWS
By Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 19, 2012
My elementary school principal was fond of reminding his students that the last perfect person walked this Earth 2,000 years ago. (Note to the litigious types over at the ACLU: It was permissible to provide such insight in light of the school's affiliation with the Lutheran Church.) The reminder was typically offered whenever a misbehaving student admitted to a youthful indiscretion. Our wonderful Mr. Zielski simply wished to teach his kids that the human condition means mistakes will be made along the way, and owning up to them will earn forgiveness here and in the hereafter.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley covered a range of topics at last night's Baltimore Sun Newsmaker Forum , including a defense of his crime policies during his tenure as Baltimore's mayor. He told Maryland Voices editor Andrew A. Green that increased arrests under his zero-tolerance philosophy was a "greater enforcement of the law" and was endorsed by residents, and said it laid the groundwork for the steep reductions in homicides that occurred after he left the city and new policies were put in place.  "All the smart people knew there's nothing you can do about [the homicide rate]
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,1992 TPG COMMUNICATIONS | March 16, 1992
Robert X. Cringely's "Accidental Empires: How the Boys of Silicon Valley Make Their Millions, Battle Foreign Competition, and Still Can't Get a Date" is a wonderfully readable, acerbic, funny tale of America's most important "industry": microprocessors, software and personal computers. Few survive Cringely unscathed. Even the index, with entries such as "IBM, demise of," packs a wallop!Cringely concludes by addressing "the greatest threat to our computing future as a nation. Forget about the Japanese; their threat is nothing compared to [the]
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 1, 1997
BOSTON -- At Fenway Park, where the hapless Red Sox are stumbling through a train wreck of a summer, we find a scalper who sells us tickets only a few dollars over face value and sit ourselves behind first base near a couple of young guys lighting up a joint. Ticket scalping and pot smoking in public: In Boston, at the present time, these constitute the makings of an absolute crime wave.Forget what you hear about the death of American cities. People here are feeling so lovely about their hometown these days, they don't even have to inhale to get high.
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