Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSmart Meters
IN THE NEWS

Smart Meters

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | August 14, 2010
Baltimore Gas & Electric has bragged since last summer about its proposal to install "smart," computerized electricity meters in 2 million Central Maryland households and businesses. "We are really at the cusp of one of the greatest transformations of the electric grid ever," Mayo Shattuck, CEO of BGE parent Constellation Energy, said last year. Smart meters won't just give customers more than $2 billion in savings, he said; they'll deliver "reliability, service quality and environmental benefits.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 22, 2014
The BGE Smart Meter program is good for the company and punishes the opt-out consumer. The only way consumers benefit is if they choose not to bake, do laundry or vacuum on the days BGE chooses for energy savings. Why should BGE dictate my life? ( "Cost of not taking a smart meter arrives," Aug. 8). Some 350,000 customers have electric meters which are not accessible, and 20,000 have opted out. According to BGE's website, it has some 1.2 million customers, of which about 370,000 are customers without smart meters.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 24, 2012
The irony of the current BGE Smart Meter controversy is delicious: Here's a publicly traded company that wants to use technology to improve its business, but conservative extremists are pleading with the government they hate so much to intercede ("Smart meters are dangerous," March 26). "Smaller government, less regulation!" they demand - except when they deem the regulation good and just. Actually, I can see their point. If we allow BGE to install Smart Meters, our privacy will be compromised, right?
NEWS
August 15, 2014
I agree with the sentiments noted in " Smart meter apathy" (Aug. 11). BGE showed up at my door the same week I received a notice saying they would be in my neighborhood. I didn't understand that I had to make an appointment if I didn't want them to shut off my electricity with no notice in the middle of my work day (I work from home). I refused the service. I never heard from them again. I have enough going on in my life that it did not make it to my calendar to schedule an appointment.
NEWS
March 25, 2012
Smart meters are an insidious, violating and dangerous technology being ushered in at a speed the public cannot fathom ("BGE to begin smart meter installation in May," March 18). They are a health and privacy disaster in the making. Smart meters are currently mandatory, relying on radio frequency radiation or RF/wireless signals. The utility asserts that it will only transmit your personal data two minutes a day. In reality, to maintain the entire mesh network, all meters will be talking with one another 24/7, engulfing our homes and neighborhoods continuously with RF radiation.
NEWS
June 25, 2010
In rejecting BGE's smart meter proposal, with $200 million in stimulus funding hanging in the balance, members of the Public Service Commission must have known they might be criticized ("Dumb decision on smart meters," June 23). Critics of the decision fail to recognize that the PSC did not reject smart meters — it rejected BGE's risky funding scheme. BGE proposed increasing rates by more than $800 million to pay for the smart meters and later was awarded a $200 million federal stimulus grant to offset some of that cost.
NEWS
May 12, 2014
I could not agree more that there is a serious problem with installing utility company smart meters that have not been tested on animals for long term effects ( "Indoor meters present challenges in smart-meter rollout," April 28). I have heard many stories and have no idea if any are true or not. But what if they are? If you ask BGE there are no issues. However: I live in a condo and will have 13 meters behind the head of my bed. I have had cancer three times and am fairly certain that the radiation from my first cancer caused the third cancer.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
The sentiments in the "Smart Meters? BGE must think we're dumb" letter of June 25 eliminate any doubt about whether BGE is right. Our present flat-rate metering of our highly-variable-cost electricity as demanded by that writer is what's dumb. Electricity costs vary by a factor of five to 20 over the hours of the day. Demanding to stick with flat rate metering penalizes the energy conscious consumer and rewards the clueless, wasteful, power hogging, stuck-in-last-century consumer. People with even a modicum of hope for the future and a sense of conservation and efficiency need and want smart meters so that we can use our energy intelligently and pay for it intelligently.
NEWS
June 16, 2014
More and more smart people are opting out of so-called smart meters. They know the opt out fees, dreamed up out of thin air by BGE and PEPCO, are a punitive device to try and force us into submission. Smart people know that the time-of-use rates we will be charged through smart meters will cost us more than any fees imposed ( "Indoor meters present challenges in smart-meter rollout," April 28). So how are we going to reach the greenhouse gas reduction goals set forth by the 2008 Empower Maryland legislation?
NEWS
August 18, 2010
The editorial "Baltimore's energy IQ" (Aug. 17) should be titled "Baltimore's lack of energy IQ" because The Baltimore Sun has done nothing to explain how consumers will save with smart meters. Your statement "computerized monitoring...will allow customers to reduce consumption on peak days, saving perhaps $100 annually" is really the crux of the matter, yet The Baltimore Sun has never explained how this will happen. I get the impression from your editorial that you don't know either.
NEWS
By Joseph Ganem | August 14, 2014
In the switch to "smart meters," BGE is inconveniencing its customers for something they probably don't even want and is somewhat suspect, anyway: Just imagine the information BGE will be able to glean from real-time utility usage data available with smart meters. It will likely be possible for the company to not only deduce the number of people living in your house, but also when they go to work, return home, eat, watch TV, go to bed and so on, because all of these activities involve turning on and off appliances of various kinds and using more or less electricity.
NEWS
August 11, 2014
The smart meter conspiracy theorists are no doubt buoyed by the news that BGE has been unable to secure appointments to replace the old, analog meters in the homes of some 350,000 customers. But there is no reason to think this reflects some groundswell of opposition to the new technology; on the contrary, it is a clear outlier when it comes to other smart meter installation projects across the nation and even within Maryland. The smart meter conversions for Pepco and Delmarva, for example, are 99 percent complete with opt-out rates of well less than 1 percent.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
As bills go out with the first fees for customers who don't want smart meters, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. is pressing to apply the charges to a much larger group - people the utility says have ignored repeated requests to switch out old meters located indoors or behind locked gates. About 350,000 customers with inaccessible meters - more than a quarter of BGE's territory - haven't scheduled appointments with contractors despite multiple attempts, the company said. That's preventing installation, but they aren't on the hook for the extra charge now levied on people who ask to opt out of a smart meter.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Big Brother is watching you — through your smart meter? One complaint about the technology, as electric and gas utilities roll it out here and across the country, is that it offers another way for government agencies — or hackers — to snoop on us. The American Civil Liberties Union notes that at least some utilities have turned over customer data after legal demands. San Diego Gas & Electric, required by California regulators to report annually on privacy issues, said it disclosed 3,056 customers' records last year, some of which could have included "energy usage data of varying granularities.
NEWS
June 16, 2014
More and more smart people are opting out of so-called smart meters. They know the opt out fees, dreamed up out of thin air by BGE and PEPCO, are a punitive device to try and force us into submission. Smart people know that the time-of-use rates we will be charged through smart meters will cost us more than any fees imposed ( "Indoor meters present challenges in smart-meter rollout," April 28). So how are we going to reach the greenhouse gas reduction goals set forth by the 2008 Empower Maryland legislation?
NEWS
May 22, 2014
Jonathan Libber has hit the nail squarely upon its head ( "BGE's 'protection money,'" May 19)! I am one of those who chose to opt out of this "gift" from the Maryland Public Service Commission. Allegedly, these "smart meters" will be a boon to the consumer as they will allow us to more judicially use our energy resources. That alone caused me to pause, I don't quite understand how that will work; how will that meter "inform" me any better than the one that I have now as to my use of energy?
NEWS
July 21, 2010
Re your editorial, "Smart meters, Redux" (July 18): Yes, the concept is smart--for the utility company, which will charge consumers even more than they already do (and get undeserved and unnecessary stimulus funds to boot). Hasn't The Baltimore Sun heard about the dismal reports in California, where the new meters didn't work properly and consumers were overcharged? BGE has been consistently raising rates already, and I don't care to pay more for a Big Brother system I don't even want.
NEWS
May 21, 2014
Regarding Jonathan D. Libber's critique of smart meters ( "BGE Smart Meter fees amount to 'protection money,'" May 19), I think building a "smart grid" is probably a good thing, but I certainly can't applaud the utility's means of going about it. Attempts to sell customers on their supposedly newfound ability to lower utility bills are laughable. We know how to do that now: use less heat and AC, cook during off-hours, do the laundry at 3 a.m. But imposing a penalty for "opting out" is not funny; it's absolutely galling and has no place in the Free State.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.