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NEWS
September 21, 2011
Frederick County Commissioner Blaine R. Young's op-ed piece in The Sun ("Smart Growth politics," Sept. 20) causes me to write. Mr. Young might be right that Gov. Martin O'Malley's "PlanMaryland' is objectionable. Many might say Mr. Young is wrong. The silly part of Mr. Young's opinion piece is his musing that the governor has proposed this plan to boost the control of this state by "liberal Democrat jurisdictions in the metropolitan areas. " Mr. Young doesn't disagree that this plan might increase the population of the metropolitan areas.
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NEWS
June 13, 2014
Your recent article did a good job of updating readers on the status of transit-oriented development in Maryland ( "After delays, transit-oriented development starts to arrive," June 6). The economic recovery and renewed interest in living in smart growth, mixed-use communities is prompting developers to build around transit from White Flint to Owings Mills. However, the article lacked an explanation of why Marylanders need transit oriented development. Building housing, offices and stores next to transit in already-built communities is a key strategy to curb sprawl, protect the environment, create vibrant communities and make the best use of public investments in infrastructure.
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NEWS
By Richard Eberhardt Hall | April 28, 2011
Today the Maryland Department of Planning is unveiling a draft of Maryland's first state growth plan, which we're calling PlanMaryland. In 1974, the General Assembly authorized such a plan "to promote the general welfare and prosperity of the people of the state through coordinated development of the state," but such a plan was never fulfilled. Maryland went on to adopt pioneering policies to promote smart growth, but the results have fallen far short of the original ambition. In fact, since a pioneering law was passed in 1997 to encourage development in areas best equipped for it, more than three-quarters of residential growth in land area has occurred outside those areas in Maryland.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 4, 2012
Arthur Fong Kaff of Bel Air has been appointed to the Harford County Board of Education to fill the vacancy caused by the sudden death in September of the board's president, Dr. Leonard Wheeler. Gov. Martin O'Malley announced the appointment Kaff on Thursday, along with the appointment of Jan Stinchcomb of Abingdon to a seat on the Harford Community College Board of Trustees. According to background information supplied by the governor's office, Kaff is a lawyer who serves as an attorney advisor in the Ethics, Legislation and Government Information Practices Branch in the Office of the Judge Advocate General Headquarters for the Department of the Army.
NEWS
August 18, 2011
I agree with the conclusion of your editorial "Drawing the line on development" (Aug. 10): Smart growth is not no growth. It is growth that maximizes the public investment in existing infrastructure and minimizes costly environmental impact. The pressures your editorial cited are precisely why the O'Malley administration successfully pushed in 2009 for passage of the Smart, Green & Growing Act. It requires zoning to support comprehensive local plans so that land use truly aligns with a community's stated planning goals.
NEWS
November 11, 2009
In response to the story "Smart Growth incentives fail to rein in suburban sprawl" (Nov. 3) there's no denying that sprawl continues to be a problem and that we need to work together to solve it. But the limitations of the Priority Funding Areas charted during Gov. Parris N. Glendenning's administration were known long ago. In fact, they were pointed out 11 years ago, not long after the law passed, in a report by the nonprofit Abell Foundation. In addition, most of the research analysis cited in the article came from our own data.
NEWS
By James T. Smith Jr | February 2, 2010
The Baltimore Sun recently published an editorial in support of the Maryland Department of the Environment's proposed new storm water regulations, to become effective May 4. What The Sun's editorial neglected to appreciate was the threat these new regulations pose to Smart Growth in Maryland. Particularly for Maryland's most populous jurisdictions, such as Baltimore County, redevelopment provides a critical opportunity to absorb new population growth, maximize the use of public infrastructure and create economic opportunity and jobs, while simultaneously reducing consumption of valuable land and rural open space.
NEWS
By Gerrit-Jan Knaap | January 6, 2011
Although Maryland has a national reputation as a leader in smart growth, urban development continues in places where it is not wanted and rarely occurs in places where it is desperately needed, a University of Maryland report reveals. Further, in several smart growth performance measures — multi-family housing construction, per-capita vehicle miles traveled, housing affordability and compact development — Maryland ranks near the middle of the 50 states and has not measurably gained ground over the last decade.
NEWS
February 19, 2010
Let's not dump Maryland's stormwater regulations overboard ("A threat to Smart Growth" Feb. 2). Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr., other local governments and developers have raised the alarm that the new regulations will halt smart growth infill and redevelopment projects. We reviewed the regulations with the same concern in mind, but the combination of the stronger standard for new development in suburban and rural areas and the flexibility for urban areas and redevelopment allows for both smart growth and better management of stormwater.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 19, 2012
Stop the presses: A new report finds that Maryland's 15-year-old Smart Growth law isn't working very well. That's hardly news. The state's own data have shown for years that more land continues to be developed for homes in the countryside instead of in urbanized areas, where growth is meant to go under the 1997 law. But the report issued Wednesday by the National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education at the University...
NEWS
By Parris N. Glendening and Deron Lovaas | October 8, 2012
Mitt Romney should stick to his record as Massachusetts governor when it comes to smart growth. Flipping through the 2012 GOP platform for positions on this important issue, we find breathlessly inflammatory items such as: •Accusing the Obama administration of replacing "civil engineering with social engineering as it pursues an exclusively urban vision of dense housing and government transit"; •"We condemn the current Administration's continued...
EXPLORE
September 18, 2012
Let me start by saying that 1st District Councilperson Tom Quirk has made some good decisions in this CZMP. Most are issues that Rebecca and I endorsed throughout the process. I find it misleading for him, however, to be making statements that he down-zoned 43 percent of the total acreage under consideration to protect natural resources. Planning Officer Dennis Wertz states that the approximate 114 down-zoned acres were never in danger from development and that this was done simply to clean up the zoning map, making it more uniform.
NEWS
August 10, 2012
Like an addicted gambler, we believe the next card will make us a winner, and we no longer even consider "standing pat. " Apparently, expanded gambling in Maryland is inevitable. Maryland House Speaker Michael Busch says the legislature aims to put the best possible law before voters, but he no longer questions the need, value or risks of additional gambling in Maryland. Del. Sandy Rosenberg tells constituents he is working to make new gambling legislation as good as it can be, but he dismisses the idea that additional gambling could be voted down.
NEWS
June 26, 2012
Baltimore County Councilman Kenneth N. Oliver wants his colleagues to reject a proposal to allow a retail development anchored by a Wegmans supermarket at the former Solo Cup site in Owings Mills. He cites traffic congestion as his main concern. ("Oliver pushes for council to reject Solo Cup rezoning," June 21.) Mr. Oliver also thinks the site should be preserved as manufacturing. I live in the 2nd district directly across from the proposed site. The traffic from the Solo Cup site when it was operational was horrific.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 1, 2012
A controversial big housing development in western Maryland that was reported last fall to be shelved apparently has new life. Terrapin Run, which sparked lawsuits and legislation to strengthen the state's Smart Growth laws, is back on track, Columbia developer Michael Carnock told WCBC radio in Cumberland.  He said he hopes to proceed with his original plan to build 4,000 townhomes in eastern Allegany County. The developer had reportedly been trying to sell the 935-acre site near the Green Ridge State Forest, and Allegany's county commissioners agreed to drop their lawsuit against the state planning and environment departments to aid a sale, according to the radio station.
NEWS
April 16, 2012
I'll be honored today to accept a national planning award on behalf of Gov.Martin O'Malleyat the national conference of the American Planning Association, the largest professional planning organization in the country, representing 40,000 members. The APA selected Governor O'Malley for its 2012 National Planning Leadership Award for his advocacy of green policy and smart-growth planning. He's the first governor to win a national award from the distinguished group in at least eight years since Governor Ruth Ann Minner of Delaware in 2004 and Governor Christine Todd Whitman of New Jersey in 2000.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 14, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley's retooled proposal to limit development on septic tanks gets a hearing in Annapolis today, along with his other major green initiatives - increasing the "flush fee" to fix wastewater treatment plants and providing ratepayer subsidies to boost offshore wind energy projects. Lawmakers will hear from the governor on all three measures, but also from environmental and smart-growth activists, local officials, farmers and developers. Among those making a case for curbing low-density development on septics will be the Queen Anne's Conservation Association, which commissioned a study of growth trends in the Eastern Shore county just across the Bay Bridge from Annapolis.   You can view a YouTube summary of the study by Washington College here: Opposing the bill will be rural and some suburban officials, development and farming groups.  Interestingly, the Maryland Association of Counties, traditionally skeptical and even resistant of any state Smart Growth proposal, has decided to support the bill with amendments.  That may signify some support for the curbs among the more urban of the suburban counties, or it could be a ruse to appear supportive while proposing changes that effectively gut the legislation.  Carroll County 's commissioners, among the most vehemently opposed to any state role in curbing septics or limiting sprawl, take a hard line.  Richard Rothschild, vice president of the commissioners,...
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
A state panel said Wednesday that members of the Carroll County Board of Commissioners violated the state's Open Meetings Act by holding a fee-based forum on a controversial smart-growth policy attended by a majority of the board. "The County Board violated the Act by charging admission to a meeting held for the consideration of public business," the Open Meetings Compliance Board said in a written opinion. "We commend the County's prompt posting of materials from the event on its website.
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