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NEWS
May 11, 1999
NATO must stay the course -- even when things go wrong -- bombing Serbia until it agrees to reverse the ethnic cleansing of Kosovo and return its people to live in peace secure from terror.The bomb that destroyed the Chinese embassy in Belgrade on Friday, killing three Chinese, was a smart bomb that worked. Human intelligence programmed it to hit the wrong building, 200 yards from the right one.The intended target was Yugoslav military procurement headquarters. The building hit had been China's embassy for the past two years.
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SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | May 1, 2012
What in the world came over John Harbaugh this morning? Ravens fans, you might want to circle the Sept. 23 game against the New England Patriots on your calendar. Might be a few extra fireworks at M&T Bank Stadium that night. Things could definitely be a little frosty between the Ravens coach and Mr. Smiley himself, Patriots coach Bill Belichick. I say that because Harbaugh -- who is normally affable, but guarded with the media -- opened up and took a few shots at the Patriots this morning on  98 Rock . Did I say a few shots?
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NEWS
By Knight/Ridder Tribune | April 12, 1999
As the NATO air campaign against Yugoslavia continues, there's been a torrent of milspeak (that's "military speech"). Here is a partial list of military terms and their English equivalents:AAA: ("Triple-A"): Anti-Aircraft ArtilleryAAM: Air-to-Air MissileACE: Allied Command EuropeAGM: Air-to-Ground MissileALCM (al-come): Air-Launched Cruise MissileBDA: Battle Damage Assessment C4I (C-four-eye): Command, Control, Communications, Computers and IntelligenceCIMIC: Civil Military Cooperation OfficeCollateral damage: Destroying or damaging a site next to an intended targetCJTF: Combined Joint Task Force, running humanitarian operations in Albania and MacedoniaDPA: Dayton Peace AccordsDeconflicted: Used by Pentagon spokesman Kenneth H. Bacon to describe Belgrade, the Yugoslav capital, when allied forces couldn't bomb it because a Cypriot peace envoy was thereDegrade: To reduce enemy forcesFRY: Federal Republic of YugoslaviaFYROM: Former Yugoslav Republic of MacedoniaGBU: Guided Bomb Unit, a so-called "smart bomb"HARM: High-speed Anti-Radiation Missile, used to attack anti-aircraft radarsICTY: International Criminal Trial for the former YugoslaviaJDAM: A Joint Direct Attack Munition is a satellite guidance kit that makes a free-fall bomb into a "smart" bomb.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | June 2, 1999
Despite NATO's efforts to keep its war against President Slobodan Milosevic as surgically "clean" as possible, the bombing of Yugoslavia has killed, ton for ton, as many civilians as other air campaigns of the past quarter-century.In a little more than two months, NATO has dropped about 15,000 bombs, releasing about 13,000 tons of explosive power. Only a few dozen of these weapons have gone astray or hit the wrong target. Yet Serbian sources have reported, and NATO officials do not deny, that those errant bombs have killed 1,200 civilians -- or roughly one civilian for every 10 tons dropped.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | May 1, 2012
What in the world came over John Harbaugh this morning? Ravens fans, you might want to circle the Sept. 23 game against the New England Patriots on your calendar. Might be a few extra fireworks at M&T Bank Stadium that night. Things could definitely be a little frosty between the Ravens coach and Mr. Smiley himself, Patriots coach Bill Belichick. I say that because Harbaugh -- who is normally affable, but guarded with the media -- opened up and took a few shots at the Patriots this morning on  98 Rock . Did I say a few shots?
NEWS
By Charles W. Corddry and Charles W. Corddry,Washington Bureau of The Sun Business reporter Ted Shelsby contributed to this article | January 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- One of the most arresting television images shown around the world yesterday was that of laser-guided bombs flying through the "front door" of an Iraqi building as the U.S. F-111 launching aircraft veered to the right and headed home. The building was blown apart.The "smart" bomb used was the ultimate in sophisticated weaponry -- combining television, infrared imaging, microprocessing and laser-lighting of a target.This was indeed a "surgical" air strike of the kind long talked about by airmen but seldom achieved until the recent development of guided weapons that can be sent unerringly to their intended destinations.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 6, 1995
It has often been said that Colin Powell is politically popular because he is a blank slate.We do know some things about where he stands on some issues, but we do not know what solutions he offers to America's problems.And, the popular wisdom goes, if and when he does run for president or vice president he will be forced to talk about those solutions and reveal his stands and, therefore, his popularity must plummet as various interest groups desert him. (He is pro-choice, for instance.)But there is another trouble spot ahead for Powell that has nothing to do with his political platform:There are real questions about how Powell conducted the Persian Gulf war, how much he knew about atrocities in Vietnam, how much he is to blame for that disastrous raid in Somalia, and whether his military stance was helpful or harmful in Bosnia.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | June 2, 1999
Despite NATO's efforts to keep its war against President Slobodan Milosevic as surgically "clean" as possible, the bombing of Yugoslavia has killed, ton for ton, as many civilians as other air campaigns of the past quarter-century.In a little more than two months, NATO has dropped about 15,000 bombs, releasing about 13,000 tons of explosive power. Only a few dozen of these weapons have gone astray or hit the wrong target. Yet Serbian sources have reported, and NATO officials do not deny, that those errant bombs have killed 1,200 civilians -- or roughly one civilian for every 10 tons dropped.
NEWS
March 20, 2001
In Washington Mexico scheduled to dump water into Rio Grande Mexico will deliver nearly 200 billion gallons of water into the Rio Grande this year as part of a repayment timetable announced yesterday at the White House. U.S. and Mexican officials also agreed on an unspecified "framework for reaching agreements" on future deliveries owed by Mexico under a 1944 treaty governing waters in the Rio Grande, Colorado and Tijuana rivers. Under the U.S.-Mexico Water Treaty, Mexico is required to release some 350,000 acre feet - or 114 billion gallons - of water from six tributaries to the Rio Grande annually.
SPORTS
October 12, 2003
Bryant's legal strategy will ruin NBA career With the apparent strategy of trashing an alleged rape victim, a famous athlete once adored by sports fans has forever lost his chance to return to his livelihood. The lawyers for Kobe Bryant have embarked on a scorched earth policy toward the young woman involved. This will not endear Bryant to basketball fans. The NBA plays in close proximity to the fans in the stands, not as in football where there is distance from the field and helmets to shield the face of a player.
NEWS
May 11, 1999
NATO must stay the course -- even when things go wrong -- bombing Serbia until it agrees to reverse the ethnic cleansing of Kosovo and return its people to live in peace secure from terror.The bomb that destroyed the Chinese embassy in Belgrade on Friday, killing three Chinese, was a smart bomb that worked. Human intelligence programmed it to hit the wrong building, 200 yards from the right one.The intended target was Yugoslav military procurement headquarters. The building hit had been China's embassy for the past two years.
NEWS
By Knight/Ridder Tribune | April 12, 1999
As the NATO air campaign against Yugoslavia continues, there's been a torrent of milspeak (that's "military speech"). Here is a partial list of military terms and their English equivalents:AAA: ("Triple-A"): Anti-Aircraft ArtilleryAAM: Air-to-Air MissileACE: Allied Command EuropeAGM: Air-to-Ground MissileALCM (al-come): Air-Launched Cruise MissileBDA: Battle Damage Assessment C4I (C-four-eye): Command, Control, Communications, Computers and IntelligenceCIMIC: Civil Military Cooperation OfficeCollateral damage: Destroying or damaging a site next to an intended targetCJTF: Combined Joint Task Force, running humanitarian operations in Albania and MacedoniaDPA: Dayton Peace AccordsDeconflicted: Used by Pentagon spokesman Kenneth H. Bacon to describe Belgrade, the Yugoslav capital, when allied forces couldn't bomb it because a Cypriot peace envoy was thereDegrade: To reduce enemy forcesFRY: Federal Republic of YugoslaviaFYROM: Former Yugoslav Republic of MacedoniaGBU: Guided Bomb Unit, a so-called "smart bomb"HARM: High-speed Anti-Radiation Missile, used to attack anti-aircraft radarsICTY: International Criminal Trial for the former YugoslaviaJDAM: A Joint Direct Attack Munition is a satellite guidance kit that makes a free-fall bomb into a "smart" bomb.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 6, 1995
It has often been said that Colin Powell is politically popular because he is a blank slate.We do know some things about where he stands on some issues, but we do not know what solutions he offers to America's problems.And, the popular wisdom goes, if and when he does run for president or vice president he will be forced to talk about those solutions and reveal his stands and, therefore, his popularity must plummet as various interest groups desert him. (He is pro-choice, for instance.)But there is another trouble spot ahead for Powell that has nothing to do with his political platform:There are real questions about how Powell conducted the Persian Gulf war, how much he knew about atrocities in Vietnam, how much he is to blame for that disastrous raid in Somalia, and whether his military stance was helpful or harmful in Bosnia.
NEWS
By Charles W. Corddry and Charles W. Corddry,Washington Bureau of The Sun Business reporter Ted Shelsby contributed to this article | January 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- One of the most arresting television images shown around the world yesterday was that of laser-guided bombs flying through the "front door" of an Iraqi building as the U.S. F-111 launching aircraft veered to the right and headed home. The building was blown apart.The "smart" bomb used was the ultimate in sophisticated weaponry -- combining television, infrared imaging, microprocessing and laser-lighting of a target.This was indeed a "surgical" air strike of the kind long talked about by airmen but seldom achieved until the recent development of guided weapons that can be sent unerringly to their intended destinations.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2005
Even Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning, the NFL's most commanding field general, blinked last night when the Ravens unleashed its Rubik's Cube of a defense. But the five-time Pro Bowler had a counter-punch for Baltimore defensive coordinator Rex Ryan's shifting, sliding, charging 46 defense - a relentless, no-huddle offense that cracked the initially stubborn Ravens as the Colts cruised to a 24-7 win in the opener at M&T Bank Stadium. "I'll just give you some advice for the rest of the season, they don't play a lot of `46' - they play a lot of everything," Manning said after the game.
NEWS
By Jim Fain | March 11, 1991
IT WAS our first TV war, and it held the global village in thrall, despite the fact the censors let us see little of it except personable generals in starched fatigues and gun-camera shots of smart-bomb bulls-eyes.In the U.S., it was the most riveting living-room drama since the assassination of President Kennedy. Not surprisingly, given the immediacy and intensity of the medium, it produced wide mood swings and climaxed in a tidal wave of elation.In keeping with TV's instantaneous timetable, it provided us overnight heroes, ranging from the shrewd but compassionate field commander, Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, to the salty Pentagon briefer, Lt. Gen. Tom Kelly.
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