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Smallpox Vaccine

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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 2002
A new smallpox vaccine will be provided free to Americans who want it if the vaccine, now being manufactured, passes licensing tests as expected in 2004, Tommy G. Thompson, the secretary of health and human services, said yesterday. But in a news conference, Thompson repeated President Bush's strong recommendation made Friday that the public not seek vaccination now with an older vaccine because there is no imminent danger of a bioterrorist attack. On Friday, Bush announced his long-awaited decision to give smallpox vaccinations for the first time in 30 years to select groups of Americans.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 31, 2011
Childhood immunizations are victims of their own success. The dreadful diseases against which they protect our children are distant memories. We have forgotten polio, or that measles, mumps and rubella — the MMR of vaccine language — could cause deafness, blindness, brain damage or seizures. So, in 1998, when a British study purported to link the mysterious condition known as autism to those vaccinations, it was easy for parents to decide to err on the side of caution. More recently, as we became obsessed with the pesticides used to grow our food and the additives used to preserve its flavors, the unknown concoction of drugs injected into our newborns was one more thing to be suspicious of, to be fearful of. One more thing we believe we can safely live without.
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NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
Emergency first-responders for Harford County's two hospitals - Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air and Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace - will be vaccinated against smallpox when Maryland receives the vaccine, according to the county Health Department. Harford is planning health response teams that will consist of three groups of six people each, said Pat Okin, communicable disease supervisor. All team members will be trained and vaccinated. Debbie Bittle, director of risk management and patient safety at Upper Chesapeake, said the hospitals are working to provide educational packets for response team members.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
Racing to control a monkeypox outbreak that has spread to four states, the federal government yesterday recommended smallpox vaccinations for anyone - including children and pregnant women - exposed to animals sickened by the monkeypox virus. Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson also imposed an immediate ban on importation of pet rodents from Africa, as well as the sale and transport of native American prairie dogs and six African rodent species that might carry the disease.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2002
WASHINGTON - A pharmaceutical company agreed yesterday to donate more than 75 million doses of smallpox vaccine to the U.S. government, greatly speeding federal health officials toward their goal of being able to vaccinate every U.S. resident in the event of an outbreak of the deadly disease. The doses had been stockpiled at the Swiftwater, Pa., branch of the French vaccine maker Aventis Pasteur since the United States ended its mandatory inoculation program in 1972. Federal health officials said they believed the doses were potent but the vaccine must undergo further testing.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 2002
Leading medical groups are urging caution in the use of smallpox vaccine, particularly if no cases of the disease occur. Their concerns stem from the risks of the vaccine, which is significantly more likely than any other vaccine to cause serious side effects. On Friday, government health officials said for the first time that they favored offering smallpox vaccine to the public even if no bioterror attack occurred, though only after health workers were immunized and a vaccine was licensed for general use, possibly in 2004.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2000
BioReliance Corp. has won a contract to manufacture smallpox vaccine for the U.S. military at its new, $24 million Rockville plant, providing the latest example of Maryland's fledgling identity as a place where biotech drugs are discovered and made. The plant, which quietly began making its first products in June, is at least the second major biotech plant along the Interstate 270 Technology Corridor to begin production in less than a year. BioReliance initially will provide an undisclosed number of vaccine doses for stockpiling, with the capacity to produce up to several million doses if needed.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2001
Shares of BioReliance Corp. gained nearly 10 percent yesterday on news that the contract manufacturer will help develop and test 155 million doses of smallpox vaccine that the federal government has ordered to protect U.S. civilians in case of a bioterrorist attack. Shares of the Rockville-based company rose $2.59 yesterday to close at $28.64 on the Nasdaq stock market. BioReliance, which already manufactures smallpox vaccine under two contracts, is a subcontractor on the latest order, which Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson announced Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
Chesapeake Biological Laboratories Inc. cut the ribbon yesterday on a $16 million plant where it will put smallpox vaccine into vials, the final step in a manufacturing process designed to stockpile enough of the vaccine to protect every U.S. civilian. The southwest Baltimore contract manufacturer, a subsidiary of Winnipeg, Manitoba-based Cangene Corp., built the 12,000-square-foot plant under a shroud of secrecy in just three months - years faster than usual for biotechnology plant construction.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 14, 2002
New York researchers are leading the most ambitious smallpox study to date, examining how the vaccine responds in people born from the late 1920s through the early 1970s, government health officials confirmed yesterday. Nearly 1,000 people are being sought as volunteers for the nationwide project, in which they will receive either a dilution of the live-virus vaccine or a full-strength inoculation. The study is expected to be the largest in a series sponsored by the federal government in which the freeze-dried vaccine known as Dryvax is being administered.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2003
The search for causal relationships in medicine is nothing new. Researchers routinely toil in labs, hold clinical trials and pore over statistics, trying to learn whether one thing causes another. Sometimes, the links they anticipate don't turn up. Other times, two events that appear unrelated wind up being connected after all. Searching is what federal health officials were doing yesterday as they continued to probe whether smallpox vaccine contributed to heart problems reported by seven health care workers and 10 military personnel inoculated under a Bush administration initiative to prepare for a possible attack using biological weapons.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2003
Johns Hopkins Hospital and the University of Maryland Medical Center outlined plans yesterday for vaccinating health care workers against the deadly smallpox virus, choosing a cautious, "go-slow" approach designed to minimize risks to employees and their patients. Hopkins officials said they would vaccinate up to 250 doctors, nurses and other workers - the number the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene had requested. The University of Maryland Medical Center will vaccinate only 40 workers immediately, with the remaining 210 held in "ready reserve" to be vaccinated quickly should a smallpox outbreak occur.
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
Emergency first-responders for Harford County's two hospitals - Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air and Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace - will be vaccinated against smallpox when Maryland receives the vaccine, according to the county Health Department. Harford is planning health response teams that will consist of three groups of six people each, said Pat Okin, communicable disease supervisor. All team members will be trained and vaccinated. Debbie Bittle, director of risk management and patient safety at Upper Chesapeake, said the hospitals are working to provide educational packets for response team members.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - Just days before President Bush's smallpox vaccination program is set to begin, the number of front-line health-care workers expected to volunteer to be inoculated has shrunk sharply and some states are months away from launching their campaigns. A phone survey by the Los Angeles Times of public health officials in 20 states also revealed key misunderstandings between state and federal officials on issues as basic as when vaccines will be delivered. "All of the states have taken enormous steps ... in an incredibly short period of time," said Dr. Julie L. Gerberding, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Jonathan Bor and Erika Niedowski and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2002
A group of articles in an influential medical journal has raised questions about the government's new smallpox vaccination policy, saying that inoculating the public is too risky and that a terrorist-induced outbreak of the disease might not cause widespread infection. Researchers support vaccinating health-care workers before a possible attack, a cornerstone of the Bush administration's plan, but disagree over how many should receive the vaccine, which can lead to fatal complications for one or two of every million people inoculated.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 2002
A new smallpox vaccine will be provided free to Americans who want it if the vaccine, now being manufactured, passes licensing tests as expected in 2004, Tommy G. Thompson, the secretary of health and human services, said yesterday. But in a news conference, Thompson repeated President Bush's strong recommendation made Friday that the public not seek vaccination now with an older vaccine because there is no imminent danger of a bioterrorist attack. On Friday, Bush announced his long-awaited decision to give smallpox vaccinations for the first time in 30 years to select groups of Americans.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 17, 2001
WASHINGTON - The patients with the mysterious sickness began appearing at Oklahoma City hospitals in December of 2002, with fever, weakness and a nasty rash. Within days the rash blossomed into pus-filled bumps, almost like a severe case of acne. Soon the city had 20 cases, with others sprouting across the state. Identical symptoms were seen in Georgia, then Pennsylvania. Days later, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention made the diagnosis: smallpox. The highly infectious disease - with a 30 percent fatality rate - was last seen in the United States in 1949.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2003
The search for causal relationships in medicine is nothing new. Researchers routinely toil in labs, hold clinical trials and pore over statistics, trying to learn whether one thing causes another. Sometimes, the links they anticipate don't turn up. Other times, two events that appear unrelated wind up being connected after all. Searching is what federal health officials were doing yesterday as they continued to probe whether smallpox vaccine contributed to heart problems reported by seven health care workers and 10 military personnel inoculated under a Bush administration initiative to prepare for a possible attack using biological weapons.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 8, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - In its eagerness to prepare a plan to vaccinate 500,000 hospital workers against smallpox, the government neglected one thing: Nobody alerted the people who are supposed to get the inoculations. Tomorrow is the deadline for states to submit their smallpox-vaccination plans to Washington. President Bush is expected to approve an inoculation program any day now, and vaccinations are supposed to begin next month. The program is designed to inoculate enough doctors, nurses and other emergency workers to deal with a smallpox outbreak in the United States if the deadly virus becomes a bioterrorist weapon.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 14, 2002
New York researchers are leading the most ambitious smallpox study to date, examining how the vaccine responds in people born from the late 1920s through the early 1970s, government health officials confirmed yesterday. Nearly 1,000 people are being sought as volunteers for the nationwide project, in which they will receive either a dilution of the live-virus vaccine or a full-strength inoculation. The study is expected to be the largest in a series sponsored by the federal government in which the freeze-dried vaccine known as Dryvax is being administered.
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