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By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2001
It may not feel like it, but a new bull market has begun and investors shouldn't look to the usual crowd of blue-chip and technology companies to lead the way, according to Richard Cripps, chief market strategist of Legg Mason Inc. Instead, investors should be eyeing small- and medium-size, dividend-paying companies, many of which were largely forgotten in the market's rapid rise. "Small- and mid-cap stocks tend to outperform large stocks ... in the early stages of a bull market and the outperformance can last for a period of time," said Cripps, who addressed investors in a live, online presentation Wednesday night.
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BUSINESS
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2005
Lights pulsate as cameras sweep the CNBC set, lightning crackling on a flat-panel screen while booms of thunder punctuate a loud electronic guitar riff. Then a middle-aged man in rolled-up shirt-sleeves flings his chair across the room, gesticulating wildly as he shouts: "Are you reaaddyyy SKIDADDYYY?!?" This is not your father's finance show. It's Mad Money With Jim Cramer, the former hedge fund manager's high-octane hourlong take on the world of stocks. For CNBC, it's a far cry from sedate business fare like Louis Rukeyser's Wall $treet Week, which used to define the genre.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times | March 29, 1991
NEW YORK -- Stocks seesawed yesterday, ending in a small decline, as many traders took the day off in advance of Good Friday and activity dropped to its lowest level since late January.The Dow Jones industrial average, which twice during the day eked out a 10-point gain, ended at 2,913.86, down 3.71 points. But for the holiday-shortened week it rose 54.95.The market is closed today in observance of Good Friday.The Standard & Poor's 500-stock index and the Nasdaq composite index also posted tiny losses on the day, showing the decline, however small, was widespread.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2001
It may not feel like it, but a new bull market has begun and investors shouldn't look to the usual crowd of blue-chip and technology companies to lead the way, according to Richard Cripps, chief market strategist of Legg Mason Inc. Instead, investors should be eyeing small- and medium-size, dividend-paying companies, many of which were largely forgotten in the market's rapid rise. "Small- and mid-cap stocks tend to outperform large stocks ... in the early stages of a bull market and the outperformance can last for a period of time," said Cripps, who addressed investors in a live, online presentation Wednesday night.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 22, 1992
NEW YORK -- Stock prices pulled back yesterday for the second day in a row, with investors apparently sounding a note of caution after a giddy ride in recent weeks.Also weighing on the market was a computer problem that prevented the main NASDAQ indexes from being calculated for most of the day.Traders knew there was weakness in smaller stocks -- it was determined that the NASDAQ composite dropped a hefty 14.51 points, or 2.3 percent, to 604.87 -- but the uncertainty was compounded by the absence of firm numbers.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | February 24, 1993
NEW YORK -- Stocks finished mixed yesterday amid concern about an economic report indicating that consumer confidence was beginning to falter."The drop in consumer confidence is the first bad economic news we've seen in quite a while," said Thom Brown, managing director at Rutherford, Brown & Catherwood.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 19.72 points, to 3,323.27, led by declines in Disney, Sears and General Motors. The NASDAQ index of smaller stocks continued to slump, losing 0.86, to 651.56, its lowest close since Dec. 16.But advancing stocks exceeded declining issues on the New York Stock Exchange by a slim margin.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | August 17, 1998
NEW YORK -- Market drops test an investor's resolve. Are you really in stocks for the long term, or do TV's breathless reports on a price plunge scare you away?It's hard not to be scared, when you're unused to sudden price drops of 10 percent. Generally speaking, blue chip stocks haven't seesawed much in recent years -- they've just cheerfully gone up.Historically, however, drops are as common as crows, according to Ned Davis Research. Going back to 1900, the market has fallen 10 percent (or a bit more)
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 8, 1995
Most mutual fund investors had a bad 1994, as stock funds lost just over 2.5 percent on average, and bond funds fell nearly twice that.But 1995 looks more promising. Ballooning equity valuations have finally burst. And last year's growing economy, which prompted the Fed to raise interest rates six times, may at last be starting to slow down.Given last year's tough markets, it is not surprising that the theme in 1995 fixes on rebounds. That's the common thread running through investments picked by the three advisers who were once again asked to craft model portfolios for the year ahead.
BUSINESS
By Floyd Norris and Floyd Norris,New York Times News Service | October 3, 1991
NEW YORK -- For investors in stock mutual funds last quarter, health was beautiful and gold was a disaster. But mostly, it was a good quarter.The average stock mutual fund showed a gain of 6.7 percent, Lipper Analytical Services reported yesterday. That result was substantially better than the gains for the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index, which rose 4.5 percent before dividends and 5.3 percent including dividends.The performance reflected the fact that small stocks, generally not in the S&P 500, did substantially better than large ones.
BUSINESS
By Floyd Norris and Floyd Norris,New York Times News Service | November 4, 1990
If the market for big stocks is depressed, then the market for small stocks seems almost lifeless.Signs of distress in the over-the-counter market include trading volume, which has fallen to its lowest level in almost two years, and prices, which have fallen relentlessly to the lowest levels in several years for many stocks. Prices are falling much more rapidly than among larger stocks.While the big NASDAQ stocks -- like Apple Computer, MCI Communications and Intel -- trade generally in line with the large stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the smaller stocks, the ones that are not household names, have suffered the greatest carnage.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | August 17, 1998
NEW YORK -- Market drops test an investor's resolve. Are you really in stocks for the long term, or do TV's breathless reports on a price plunge scare you away?It's hard not to be scared, when you're unused to sudden price drops of 10 percent. Generally speaking, blue chip stocks haven't seesawed much in recent years -- they've just cheerfully gone up.Historically, however, drops are as common as crows, according to Ned Davis Research. Going back to 1900, the market has fallen 10 percent (or a bit more)
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 8, 1998
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks rose yesterday, as investors who sold richly valued large stocks this week moved money into small and midsize companies.The small-stock Russell 2,000 index extended Thursday's rise, soaring 9.18, or 2.3 percent, to 415.80. The Russell's gains were led by little-known names such as PMC-Sierra Inc., a maker of parts for computer networks, up $3.625 to $36.25.The Standard & Poor's 400 midcap index rose 5.85, or 1.8 percent, to 340.84, led by software and oil drilling stocks such as Network Associates Inc. and EVI Weatherford Inc.The Dow Jones industrial average eked out a gain of 20.34 to 8,598.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 8, 1995
Most mutual fund investors had a bad 1994, as stock funds lost just over 2.5 percent on average, and bond funds fell nearly twice that.But 1995 looks more promising. Ballooning equity valuations have finally burst. And last year's growing economy, which prompted the Fed to raise interest rates six times, may at last be starting to slow down.Given last year's tough markets, it is not surprising that the theme in 1995 fixes on rebounds. That's the common thread running through investments picked by the three advisers who were once again asked to craft model portfolios for the year ahead.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | March 9, 1994
Take rising interest rates. Add a failed communications merger. Stir vigorously for stock market volatility.This may seem to be a sour recipe, but editors of the nation's best-performing investment letters believe the dish will be quite tasty once the improved earnings of U.S. companies are tossed in."Some stocks are overvalued, but economic conditions are good, with industries improving and interest rates still relatively low," observed George Putnam III, editor of the Turnaround Letter, whose portfolio recommendations provided a 57.5 percent average annual return over the past three years to lead the newsletter pack.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | July 29, 1993
Backing further away from its peak set on Monday, the Dow Jones industrial average lost 12.01 points yesterday and closed at 3,553.45. Three Dow stocks -- Du Pont, IBM and Merck -- all suffered point-plus losses, accounting for most of the Dow decline.MONEY TALK: "To die rich is to have lived in vain." (Jiddu Krishnamurti) . . . "Most of the rich people I've known have been fairly miserable." (Agatha Christie) . . . "I've been rich and I've been poor. Believe me, honey, rich is better." (Sophie Tucker.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | February 24, 1993
NEW YORK -- Stocks finished mixed yesterday amid concern about an economic report indicating that consumer confidence was beginning to falter."The drop in consumer confidence is the first bad economic news we've seen in quite a while," said Thom Brown, managing director at Rutherford, Brown & Catherwood.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 19.72 points, to 3,323.27, led by declines in Disney, Sears and General Motors. The NASDAQ index of smaller stocks continued to slump, losing 0.86, to 651.56, its lowest close since Dec. 16.But advancing stocks exceeded declining issues on the New York Stock Exchange by a slim margin.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | July 29, 1993
Backing further away from its peak set on Monday, the Dow Jones industrial average lost 12.01 points yesterday and closed at 3,553.45. Three Dow stocks -- Du Pont, IBM and Merck -- all suffered point-plus losses, accounting for most of the Dow decline.MONEY TALK: "To die rich is to have lived in vain." (Jiddu Krishnamurti) . . . "Most of the rich people I've known have been fairly miserable." (Agatha Christie) . . . "I've been rich and I've been poor. Believe me, honey, rich is better." (Sophie Tucker.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | March 9, 1994
Take rising interest rates. Add a failed communications merger. Stir vigorously for stock market volatility.This may seem to be a sour recipe, but editors of the nation's best-performing investment letters believe the dish will be quite tasty once the improved earnings of U.S. companies are tossed in."Some stocks are overvalued, but economic conditions are good, with industries improving and interest rates still relatively low," observed George Putnam III, editor of the Turnaround Letter, whose portfolio recommendations provided a 57.5 percent average annual return over the past three years to lead the newsletter pack.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 22, 1992
NEW YORK -- Stock prices pulled back yesterday for the second day in a row, with investors apparently sounding a note of caution after a giddy ride in recent weeks.Also weighing on the market was a computer problem that prevented the main NASDAQ indexes from being calculated for most of the day.Traders knew there was weakness in smaller stocks -- it was determined that the NASDAQ composite dropped a hefty 14.51 points, or 2.3 percent, to 604.87 -- but the uncertainty was compounded by the absence of firm numbers.
BUSINESS
By Tom Petruno and Tom Petruno,Los Angeles Times | January 5, 1992
Stocks and bonds in 1991 paid off like a Las Vegas slot machine gone haywire, producing double-digit returns that embarrassed most other investments.But financial markets tend to adjust themselves faster than most casino managers can pull the plug on errant slots. In 1992, investors will have to lower their sights a lot, most Wall Street experts say.With stocks in particular, "don't expect the kinds of returns that you had in 1991," warns Bob Chesek, money manager at the Phoenix Group of mutual funds in Hartford, Conn.
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