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By Donna M. Owens and For The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
City slickers, be forewarned. One visit to this picturesque and utterly charming town on Maryland's Eastern Shore, and even devout urbanites may be tempted to pull up roots, pack their bags and change ZIP codes. That's no exaggeration. Berlin has in recent years welcomed an influx of new residents -- nicknamed "come heres" in the local parlance. Indeed, those who discover this locale less than 10 miles from Ocean City and Assateague Island's famous ponies will find a destination that's increasingly gaining national buzz.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and For The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
City slickers, be forewarned. One visit to this picturesque and utterly charming town on Maryland's Eastern Shore, and even devout urbanites may be tempted to pull up roots, pack their bags and change ZIP codes. That's no exaggeration. Berlin has in recent years welcomed an influx of new residents -- nicknamed "come heres" in the local parlance. Indeed, those who discover this locale less than 10 miles from Ocean City and Assateague Island's famous ponies will find a destination that's increasingly gaining national buzz.
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NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | December 21, 2007
SMITHSBURG -- By yesterday morning, the flags were already flying half-staff at the school and the volunteer firehouse. Black bunting went up at Town Hall, and, because it seemed too cruel a contrast, the Christmas lights came down. Officer Christopher Shane Nicholson, one of three policemen here, was shot and killed Wednesday night, and it didn't take long for the news -- or the shock and the grief -- to tear through this community of about 3,000 east of Hagerstown. "When you're in a small, close-knit community and helicopters are flying overhead, it doesn't take long to find out," said Lori Hartley, who saw emergency responders flooding a rural area northeast of town where the young and well-liked officer was shot.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 24, 2014
It what could be truly considered a tourism manager's dream, Havre de Grace has made Smithsonian Magazine's list of "The Best 20 Small Towns to Visit in 2014. " The April edition of Smithsonian places Havre de Grace at No. 12 on the list, just behind Spring Green, Wisc., and just ahead of Columbia, Pa. The complete list can be viewed online at http://www.smithsonianmag.com . Brigitte Peters, manager of the city's Office of Marketing and Tourism, calls the selection "exciting," one that she says should benefit the entire state of Maryland, other towns and counties, as well as Havre de Grace and Harford County.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | August 5, 1994
New hands and new plans are guiding the development of the 171-acre Phillips property on Route 75 in northern Union Bridge.Baltimore-based land planner D.S. Thaler and Associates Inc. replaces Stanford Management Group Inc., formerly of Howard County, in designing the development of 400-plus units that will double the size of the town.David S. Thaler, president of D. S. Thaler, said design plans made before his company's involvement in the development are no longer being considered."It's a clean slate, and we are in the very earliest stages of our planning," he said.
NEWS
By Garrison Kellor | June 7, 2007
I bought a jar of elderberry jelly and an armload of rhubarb at a small-town festival last week, simply because the seller was a slender, fair-haired, luminous beauty who happened to be Amish, sitting, demure in a black bonnet, at a table beside her horse and buggy. There was a time I would've pitied her for her stern upbringing and all the deprivations thereof, but nowadays I tend to pity the children of heedless parents. Great romantic visionaries who leave a trail of messed-up progeny and embittered lovers.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | February 3, 1993
EASTON -- Now comes the book "The 100 Best Small Towns in America" and what's listed as best town number 26? Easton, the home of 9,370 residents, plus newcomers Randy Bedell and Marc Delpino.Mr. Bedell and Mr. Delpino didn't need Norman Crampton's book to tell them what they already knew.Looking to escape the hubbub of New York City, the two shop owners found refuge in Easton last June. When they return to the city to buy stock for their clothing store on North Harrison Street here, they say they can't put the metropolitan skyline behind them fast enough.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | August 12, 2007
HEBRON -- This rural crossroads is not the place Tammi Knight knew growing up. The little town of white clapboard houses has drawn newcomers who travel to jobs in Salisbury or farther. Now, with developers calling, an even bigger wave of change that is buffeting much of the Eastern Shore threatens to land at her doorstep. Waiting tables or cooking on the breakfast shift at the Hebron Family Restaurant, Knight hears all the chatter about shriveled corn and blistering summer temperatures.
BUSINESS
By Daniel Taylor and Daniel Taylor,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
Judy Callanan has lived in Frederick since last July and is enjoying her life in the bustling area with its still-rural feeling. "[Frederick] has a lot of character; it's like a small town, but it has everything you can find in the city," said the local ReMax Realtor. Frederick County has grown in popularity during recent years. The population currently stands at about 209,000, up from 150,000 in 1990. The city of Frederick has a population of about 50,000, up from 20,000 during the 1970s.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2000
Spend a day in Sykesville. The idea is not so far-fetched, according to an Easton-based marketing consultant. A town with two museums, a tourism center, a thriving Main Street, rustic walking trails, a quiet river and railroad history should bill itself as a tourist destination with old-time ambiance. "We have all the components," said Mayor Jonathan S. Herman. "We just have to pull them together into a successful package, and we'll be a tourist attraction." Consultant Steve Moore offers new strategies for small towns such as Sykesville.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Filmmakers David Posamentier and Geoff Moore knew Annapolis was the perfect place to make their movie when someone heaved a trash can through a plate-glass window - and no one made a peep. The someone was actor Sam Rockwell, who stars in "Better Living Through Chemistry" as a nebbishy small-town pharmacist unexpectedly displaying a chemically enhanced backbone. The place was State Circle in Annapolis, just across the street from the Maryland State House. Posamentier and Moore were shooting a scene that involved Rockwell's character vandalizing his own pharmacy.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Berlin is feeling a little cooler than usual after being named "America's Coolest Small Town" by Budget Travel magazine. The Eastern Shore town topped the in the magazine's 9th annual online contest to find hip and happening tiny burgs across the United States. With a population of 4,563, a beautiful downtown, a popular craft brewery, museums and even a song - "Cool Berlin" - to promote the town, Berlin ticked all the boxes, winning about 39,285 votes in the contest that began Jan. 16 and ended early Tuesday.
EXPLORE
May 3, 2013
Students at West Middle School will perform Meredith Willson's “ Music Man, Junior” this weekend a t the West Middle School Auditorium, 60 Monroe St., Westminster. Performances are Friday, May 3 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, May 4 at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets are $5 and are available at the West Middle Box Office. “Music Man Junior” is the story of 'Professor' Harold Hill, a traveling salesman who comes to a small town in Iowa hoping to make his fortune by selling his music and band equipment to the area's youth.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
Edward Reed was a mess. Jeanne Hall - the woman the Ravens safety calls a second mother - can't find any other way to put it when she thinks back to the classes he missed and the assignments he disregarded as a freshman at Destrehan High. But he was such a charming, clever mess - a kid who wrote romantic poems at the same time he played football like no one the school had ever seen. "You're either going to be a comedian or a preacher," she used to say on the many nights he stayed at her home, trying to get his world in order.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 13, 2012
Catonsville's business district does not seem to change much. Large-scale development has skipped over Frederick Road and left the core of the 19th- and 20th-century shop fronts facing the old turnpike and streetcar route alone. It's clean and orderly, but not gentrified or given to a faux-Nantucket boutique treatment. The street has never surrendered its small-town feel, and the residents like it that way. I spoke with Lynn Tawney Street, who is a big believer in the small-town charms of the neighborhood where she has lived her entire life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Andy Griffith, one of the stars who put CBS on top of the TV world in the 1960s with an easy-going but culturally-packed sitcom that ran for eight seasons during that stormy decade in American life, died Tuesday at 86 at his North Carolina home in Roanoke Island. Like Fred MacMurry, whose range ran from the feature film  "Double Indemnity"  to TV's "My Three Sons," Griffith was far more than just another TV actor from the early days of the medium. Before TV and Sheriff Andy Taylor, he was Lonesome Rhodes in Elia Kazan's "A Face in the Crowd," And he found renewed TV fame in the 1980s and '90s as Harvard-educated attorney Ben Matlock.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
DENTON -- Perched on a bluff overlooking the Choptank River, this town of fewer than 3,000 residents seems quintessential rural America. Children and old folks gather for afternoon concerts on the courthouse green. Farmers sell sweet corn from their pickups. Neighbors swap gossip at the corner lunch counter.On the surface, life appears as peaceful as a box turtle walking through a flower patch.But there's an undercurrent of unrest, a snake in the garden that has upset the notion that little towns have only little problems.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1998
The police chief of Taneytown, where the last heinous crime was a 1996 robbery and attempted murder with a brick, has no trouble catching red-light runners.There are only two traffic lights in town.Jammed parking meter in front of City Hall? Chief Melvin E. Diggs -- who spent 25 years as a patrolman, detective and administrator in Baltimore -- is ready to empty it or replace it himself.With serious crime so low, Diggs and his seven officers can enforce laws that his big-city counterparts often must ignore, such as underage smoking (15 arrests in May)
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Sixty miles east of Babe Ruth's birthplace, in the drowsy town of Sudlersville (population 497), stands a statue of the other great slugger from Maryland's past. But you'll have to stop at the town's only red light, corner of Church and Main, to view the life-size likeness of Jimmie Foxx at roadside. From his follow-through swing to the look on his face, it's clear that the bronzed Foxx has just done what he did 534 times in his 20-year career - he knocked one out of the park. That lusty swing landed the Queen Anne's County farmboy in the Baseball Hall of Fame.
NEWS
December 7, 2011
For me and many of my old school friends, sport is not about efficiency, titles and "winning" but rather about fairness and appreciation of athletic ability and the effort it takes. Instilling those values in children, whether they go on to become athletes or not, is something most parents are challenged by. Having the Ravens' training camp in a small town is right for many reasons, the biggest being the opportunity it gives the team to engage children, especially those from families who can't afford game day at the stadium.
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