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By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun Reporter | September 1, 2007
COLLEGE PARK -- Maryland running backs coach Phil Zacharias was perusing Sports Illustrated's college football preview edition, which featured the best running backs in the nation. Buried in the small print at the end of the section was Maryland senior Lance Ball's name, but teammate Keon Lattimore - tonight's starter - was nowhere to be found. Zacharias showed the magazine to his players. Villanova@Maryland Tonight, 6:05, 1300 AM, 105.7 FM
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NEWS
July 10, 2014
I got about halfway through Comcast's recent letter to the editor and then it started to sound like "small print" and I lost track of what was being said ( "Comcast provides competitive services in Baltimore," July 9). What was that gobbledygook? This is an example of Comcast's service. Sometime ago I complained about having to pay for extra boxes that originally were promoted as free, smaller than the free government boxes and providing more channels. Using the small box that I paid for I could always get limited basic service that included CNN. That ended with my most recent renewal of service.
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NEWS
September 29, 2011
I was appalled to receive my paper on Sunday, Sept. 25, and see a full-page advertising wrap with The Sun masthead at the top as if it were news content! This greatly reduces your publication's credibility. Ad wraps are bad enough, but when you put the masthead on the top, that's crossing the line. Very small print identifying it as a "special advertising section" may make it legal, but printing the masthead on it is very misleading. I'm disappointed in the continual decline of quality of The Sun, even as my subscription rates seem to increase each billing period.
NEWS
September 29, 2011
I was appalled to receive my paper on Sunday, Sept. 25, and see a full-page advertising wrap with The Sun masthead at the top as if it were news content! This greatly reduces your publication's credibility. Ad wraps are bad enough, but when you put the masthead on the top, that's crossing the line. Very small print identifying it as a "special advertising section" may make it legal, but printing the masthead on it is very misleading. I'm disappointed in the continual decline of quality of The Sun, even as my subscription rates seem to increase each billing period.
NEWS
July 10, 2014
I got about halfway through Comcast's recent letter to the editor and then it started to sound like "small print" and I lost track of what was being said ( "Comcast provides competitive services in Baltimore," July 9). What was that gobbledygook? This is an example of Comcast's service. Sometime ago I complained about having to pay for extra boxes that originally were promoted as free, smaller than the free government boxes and providing more channels. Using the small box that I paid for I could always get limited basic service that included CNN. That ended with my most recent renewal of service.
NEWS
August 10, 2011
The organized voice of "big business" uses the term "small business" to represent its own interests when it comes to government regulation Critics of federal regulation often hide behind the claim of protecting small businesses ("Too many rules," Aug. 4). Yet these critics fail to understand the needs of most small businesses - the 98 percent of all U.S. businesses with fewer than 20 employees. It's a case of the organized voice of "big business" using the term "small business" to represent its interests.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | January 24, 1993
If you've been laid off and your company hasn't provided help with job search or career counseling, you may be in the market for one of the career counseling centers that have proliferated all over the country during this recession.This sort of help can be valuable, especially if you believe you'll have to change career fields entirely in order to find employment, but it's important to remember that career counseling still is a largely unregulated field, with no licensing requirements in most states.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2001
Arizona Diamondbacks ace Randy Johnson and his teammates are understandably peeved at the ruling by the Elias Sports Bureau that Johnson will not get credit for tying the single-game strikeout record with his 20K performance Tuesday night. Johnson's name will not go alongside Roger Clemens and Kerry Wood as a co-holder of the single-game record because the game stretched into extra innings, even though he got all 20 strikeouts in nine innings. Instead, he only gets credit for having the second-most strikeouts in an extra inning game - after Tom Cheney, who worked well into extra innings to strike out 21 in a 16-inning game in 1962.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1999
Many consumers find their mailboxes crammed with credit-card offers most days, hawking low introductory rates, no annual fees, free miles or sky-high credit lines. They urge consumers to transfer balances or use the enclosed checks to take a vacation or build an addition to the house.Some offers sound good. But how's a consumer to separate the deals from the hype? Does it make sense to take advantage of introductory rates and credit-hop from bank to bank? How can cardholders tell if they're heading for trouble?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 10, 1997
As hard as it is to believe, someone has made a ripped-from-the-headlines docudrama that is more irresponsible than any of the Amy Fisher films or, even, Fox Television's dramatization of the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman.The made-for-television movie, "Love's Deadly Triangle: The Texas Cadet Murder," is based on a highly publicized 1996 case involving U.S. Naval Academy and Air Force Academy students Diane Zamora and David Graham, both now 19. It shows two Texas teen-agers killing another teen -- even though the couple has yet to be tried for the crime.
NEWS
August 10, 2011
The organized voice of "big business" uses the term "small business" to represent its own interests when it comes to government regulation Critics of federal regulation often hide behind the claim of protecting small businesses ("Too many rules," Aug. 4). Yet these critics fail to understand the needs of most small businesses - the 98 percent of all U.S. businesses with fewer than 20 employees. It's a case of the organized voice of "big business" using the term "small business" to represent its interests.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun Reporter | September 1, 2007
COLLEGE PARK -- Maryland running backs coach Phil Zacharias was perusing Sports Illustrated's college football preview edition, which featured the best running backs in the nation. Buried in the small print at the end of the section was Maryland senior Lance Ball's name, but teammate Keon Lattimore - tonight's starter - was nowhere to be found. Zacharias showed the magazine to his players. Villanova@Maryland Tonight, 6:05, 1300 AM, 105.7 FM
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2001
Arizona Diamondbacks ace Randy Johnson and his teammates are understandably peeved at the ruling by the Elias Sports Bureau that Johnson will not get credit for tying the single-game strikeout record with his 20K performance Tuesday night. Johnson's name will not go alongside Roger Clemens and Kerry Wood as a co-holder of the single-game record because the game stretched into extra innings, even though he got all 20 strikeouts in nine innings. Instead, he only gets credit for having the second-most strikeouts in an extra inning game - after Tom Cheney, who worked well into extra innings to strike out 21 in a 16-inning game in 1962.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1999
Many consumers find their mailboxes crammed with credit-card offers most days, hawking low introductory rates, no annual fees, free miles or sky-high credit lines. They urge consumers to transfer balances or use the enclosed checks to take a vacation or build an addition to the house.Some offers sound good. But how's a consumer to separate the deals from the hype? Does it make sense to take advantage of introductory rates and credit-hop from bank to bank? How can cardholders tell if they're heading for trouble?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 10, 1997
As hard as it is to believe, someone has made a ripped-from-the-headlines docudrama that is more irresponsible than any of the Amy Fisher films or, even, Fox Television's dramatization of the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman.The made-for-television movie, "Love's Deadly Triangle: The Texas Cadet Murder," is based on a highly publicized 1996 case involving U.S. Naval Academy and Air Force Academy students Diane Zamora and David Graham, both now 19. It shows two Texas teen-agers killing another teen -- even though the couple has yet to be tried for the crime.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | January 24, 1993
If you've been laid off and your company hasn't provided help with job search or career counseling, you may be in the market for one of the career counseling centers that have proliferated all over the country during this recession.This sort of help can be valuable, especially if you believe you'll have to change career fields entirely in order to find employment, but it's important to remember that career counseling still is a largely unregulated field, with no licensing requirements in most states.
FEATURES
By Lara M. Zeises and Lara M. Zeises,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1997
Penni Wilson loves M&Ms. She buys a pack of them every day on her break from her department store job at East Point Mall. The red ones are her favorite."
NEWS
By Joseph Gallagher | November 15, 1991
The Sun's occasional ''restaurant'' guides deal with places where you ''restore'' yourself with meat and drink. Originally meat meant any solid food (''fodder''). Your mate shares your meat, just as your companion (Latin: cum/panis) shares your bread.By breakfast, of course, you break your fast. By way of a French word that originally meant breakfast, dinner comes from the Latin dis-jejunus (''dis-fasting''). For lunch you eat just a ''lump'' or two. At supper you ''sup,'' with ''soup'' perhaps, or a ''sop'' of broth-dipped bread.
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