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January 24, 2012
Your editorial "A sad 'Kodak' moment" of Jan. 21 clearly identified the problem that resulted in Kodak's bankruptcy as a lack of vision by the executives. As you pointed out, it's ironic that Kodak invented digital photography in 1976 but didn't move forward aggressively. Kodak's failure to capitalize on a technology that it invented is not the first example of an American company lacking the vision to fully develop products into marketable items. Ampex invented video recording only to see foreign companies such as Sony move the technology forward and capture the major share of the market while Ampex disappeared.
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SPORTS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
The Baltimore Ravens will probably never be "America's Team," as the Dallas Cowboys came to be known in the 1970s, thanks to their frequent appearances in nationally televised games. But with the Ravens appearing in prime-time matchups three of the first four weeks of the NFL season - starting with tonight's season opener of ESPN's "Monday Night Football" - no team will have a higher national profile during the first month of NFL play. What makes that all the more remarkable is that the defending AFC North champs are a small-market franchise in a world where media market size largely determines which teams are featured in night-time, national TV games.
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SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 30, 1993
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- There's nothing more Baltimore can do to get the attention of the National Football League. It has been standing on its head for more than six years while guaranteeing a new 75,000-seat stadium, selling the required season tickets and offering each visiting team a record amount of take-home revenue, over $1 million per game.Deals don't get much better than this, even though St. Louis and Jacksonville make it sound as if they are going to surpass the Baltimore bid and run off with the coveted expansion prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew F. Lallo, Special To The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2012
DiPasquale's may be a ways from Little Italy, but nothing says Italian quite like this no-nonsense market/restaurant near Patterson Park. Go for lunch and head for the deli case to the right of the registers. Peruse a menu. The owner will take your order, give you a check and a number for your table. Your food will arrive soon. Go to the little table opposite the rest room for napkins and to the front of the store for drinks. Then sit and enjoy the food and the warm feel of the place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew F. Lallo, Special To The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2012
DiPasquale's may be a ways from Little Italy, but nothing says Italian quite like this no-nonsense market/restaurant near Patterson Park. Go for lunch and head for the deli case to the right of the registers. Peruse a menu. The owner will take your order, give you a check and a number for your table. Your food will arrive soon. Go to the little table opposite the rest room for napkins and to the front of the store for drinks. Then sit and enjoy the food and the warm feel of the place.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
The Annapolis Market House might not be confined to its four walls. Plans to revitalize the historic market call for a farmers' market just outside its doors, in addition to a new layout inside that will include vendors such as a French bakery and an oyster bar. New, bigger doors and an emphasis on highlighting merchandise in the windows will give the relatively small market an expansive feeling. "We want to open it up and go back to the heyday of the market and really reimagine it," said Baltimore-based developer Lehr Jackson, who presented his vision last week to the Economic Matter Committee of the Annapolis city council.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1996
The conventional wisdom used to be that NFL free agency would hurt small-market teams and help big-market teams.It hasn't quite worked out that way.The Green Bay Packers' crushing, 39-13 victory over the Philadelphia Eagles on Monday night showed that the NFL's smallest town, with a population under 100,000, is home to one of the league's best teams.Meanwhile, Los Angeles, the nation's second-largest city, doesn't have a team. Houston, the fourth-largest city, is on the verge of losing its team.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
Baseball owners got together in Chicago this past week to discuss the economic state of the game and explore ways -- short of collusion -- to bridge the widening gap between the big-revenue and small-revenue teams.They did not reach any hard-and-fast conclusions, and they certainly did not publicly propose another all-out war with the Major League Baseball Players Association over cost control, but they did make it clear that the competitive crisis that they predicted in the early 1990s has come to pass.
NEWS
December 13, 2000
SURE, Alex Rodriguez is a superbly talented baseball player, one of the best young shortstops in the major leagues. But is he, at age 25, worth a quarter-billion dollars? He apparently is to the Texas Rangers, a team rich in reserves thanks to a lucrative cable and broadcast deal. But for the majority of baseball teams, signing Mr. Rodriguez to a $252 million, 10-year contract was never remotely possible. They can't afford it. Thus, the disparity in baseball between rich, large-market clubs and small-market teams has widened.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | April 27, 1992
MINNEAPOLIS -- The Minnesota Twins are off to another slow start, which cannot be good news to the rest of the American League. They are two games under .500, and they are having some trouble reassembling the pieces of last year's world championship team, so it's probably a good time to check for your wallet.Just ask the first-place Oakland Athletics, who were mugged during the weekend at the Metrodome.The small-market Twins are not supposed to be able to compete -- not in the tough AL West, and not in baseball's hostile economic environment -- but they went from last to first a year ago, and they continue to act decisively in their attempt to return to the World Series.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
Your editorial "A sad 'Kodak' moment" of Jan. 21 clearly identified the problem that resulted in Kodak's bankruptcy as a lack of vision by the executives. As you pointed out, it's ironic that Kodak invented digital photography in 1976 but didn't move forward aggressively. Kodak's failure to capitalize on a technology that it invented is not the first example of an American company lacking the vision to fully develop products into marketable items. Ampex invented video recording only to see foreign companies such as Sony move the technology forward and capture the major share of the market while Ampex disappeared.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
The Annapolis Market House might not be confined to its four walls. Plans to revitalize the historic market call for a farmers' market just outside its doors, in addition to a new layout inside that will include vendors such as a French bakery and an oyster bar. New, bigger doors and an emphasis on highlighting merchandise in the windows will give the relatively small market an expansive feeling. "We want to open it up and go back to the heyday of the market and really reimagine it," said Baltimore-based developer Lehr Jackson, who presented his vision last week to the Economic Matter Committee of the Annapolis city council.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2004
The Orioles weren't the only team at Camden Yards yesterday facing a slew of offseason questions. The Minnesota Twins have issues, too, even as they coast toward their third consecutive American League Central title. Five of the core players who made this run possible may not return. Starting pitcher Brad Radke and third baseman Corey Koskie are approaching free agency. Outfielder Jacque Jones could make upward of $6 million through arbitration, so the team will likely look to trade him or non-tender his contract.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2002
Digex Inc., an Internet company in Laurel whose shares have fallen more than 99 percent from their all-time high, said yesterday that Nasdaq plans to delist its stock from the Nasdaq SmallCap Market because it has failed to get its stock price above the minimum $1 level. The company said it is appealing Nasdaq's decision. "We have requested a hearing to appeal the staff's determination," George Kerns, Digex president and chief executive officer, said in a statement. "Regardless of the outcome, we will continue with initiatives to further grow the company and ultimately meet the criteria.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2001
Major League Baseball owners voted yesterday to disband two franchises in an effort to ease the financial strain placed on the industry by a group of struggling small-market teams. Baseball commissioner Bud Selig announced the decision at a televised news conference at a hotel in Rosemont, Ill., last night, after owners reassembled for a quarterly meeting that had been postponed in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Selig did not specify which two clubs would be bought out by the remaining teams and folded - leaving fans in at least four major-league cities to wonder whether they will have a team next season.
NEWS
December 13, 2000
SURE, Alex Rodriguez is a superbly talented baseball player, one of the best young shortstops in the major leagues. But is he, at age 25, worth a quarter-billion dollars? He apparently is to the Texas Rangers, a team rich in reserves thanks to a lucrative cable and broadcast deal. But for the majority of baseball teams, signing Mr. Rodriguez to a $252 million, 10-year contract was never remotely possible. They can't afford it. Thus, the disparity in baseball between rich, large-market clubs and small-market teams has widened.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | March 20, 1992
FORT MYERS, Fla. -- If it's any consolation, the Orioles aren't the only club facing the loss of a franchise player. Their predicament with Cal Ripken is shared by Minnesota with Kirby Puckett, Pittsburgh with Barry Bonds, Texas with Ruben Sierra.All potential free agents.All small-market teams."That's a good indication that whatever is going to come upon us is upon us," Twins general manager Andy MacPhail said yesterday. "If we were in large markets, those guys in all likelihood would be inked by now. The fact they're out there is an indication we're struggling to make ends meet."
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2000
DALLAS - Even given a day to digest the Texas Rangers' 10-year, $252 million signing of free-agent shortstop Alex Rodriguez, baseball's salary structure still suffered from acute indigestion. Early Monday morning, Rangers owner Tom Hicks wrested away the sport's most talented player in a manner that has riled the game's power structure and added another chapter to agent Scott Boras' list of negotiating accomplishments. Less certain is whether Rodriguez becomes only the second of the past 11 players to be anointed as highest-paid to subsequently play for a world champion.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 25, 2000
SALISBURY - Turn on the television in these parts and you're just as likely to see an item about a rabid tabby cat on the loose or a close-up of the fried oyster sandwich at the firemen's fair or a commercial for a "pre-owned" car from Gene's Auto Sales as you are to see a fellow who happens to be running for president of the United States. It turns out the best place to see campaign 2000 is not from the media capitals of the world, but from spots like this on the Eastern Shore - the only place in Maryland where voters can catch the complete campaign advertising war on TV. While most states see only images the candidates display for mass consumption from the stump, some carefully selected communities get front-row seats to the campaign commercials that so often do the dirtiest battle.
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