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By Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | February 6, 2005
I've heard that a daily dose of aspirin might lead to an ulcer due to the corrosive effect of aspirin on the lining of the stomach. Enteric-coated aspirin is sometimes recommended. I understand that it results in the aspirin dissolving in the intestine rather than the stomach. Why is it better to get a hole in your intestine thanyour stomach? Holes in any part of the digestive tract are undesirable! Dr. Waqar Qureshi, chief of endoscopy at Baylor College of Medicine, says that doctors mostly ignored the effect of medications on the small intestine until recently because it was so hard to examine.
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FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
My cats have always had occasional hairballs, but one cat seems to have more than most - two or three a week. How can I prevent them, and should I worry? Unfortunately, cats that vomit hairballs two or three times per week may be suffering from something much more serious than the common excuse of "just hairballs. " Sometimes chronic vomiting may be due to a dietary hypersensitivity. But it could be something much more serious.   A recent study published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association found that of 100 cats with chronic vomiting studied, only one had normal gastrointestinal tissue biopsy results. The fact is that cats with chronic vomiting, even of hairballs,  may be dealing with underlying inflammatory bowel disease or even cancer of the small intestine.   You should see your veterinarian if your cat has a problem with chronic vomiting of hairballs. We are discovering that this is not a stomach disease, but a small intestine disease. An abdominal ultrasound is recommended to evaluate the small intestine and if abnormalities are found, biopsies should be performed via abdominal surgery. A biopsy diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
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FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
My cats have always had occasional hairballs, but one cat seems to have more than most - two or three a week. How can I prevent them, and should I worry? Unfortunately, cats that vomit hairballs two or three times per week may be suffering from something much more serious than the common excuse of "just hairballs. " Sometimes chronic vomiting may be due to a dietary hypersensitivity. But it could be something much more serious.   A recent study published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association found that of 100 cats with chronic vomiting studied, only one had normal gastrointestinal tissue biopsy results. The fact is that cats with chronic vomiting, even of hairballs,  may be dealing with underlying inflammatory bowel disease or even cancer of the small intestine.   You should see your veterinarian if your cat has a problem with chronic vomiting of hairballs. We are discovering that this is not a stomach disease, but a small intestine disease. An abdominal ultrasound is recommended to evaluate the small intestine and if abnormalities are found, biopsies should be performed via abdominal surgery. A biopsy diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Baffling but true: Not all writers hold editors in high esteem. But the poor dears sometimes have difficulty expressing themselves clearly. To help them out, I have constructed some "your editor" insults, on the model of "yo mama" invective. Contributors are invited to exercise their imaginations through the comments function. Your editor's so dumb, she thinks hapax legomenon is the name of a skin disease.* Your editor's so dumb, he thinks alumnis is a plural.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Kate Shatzkin contributed to this article | May 20, 1997
A Baltimore Circuit Court jury has awarded $7.7 million to a Washington County woman in a medical-malpractice trial that stemmed from an operation nine years ago in which she lost more than half of her small intestine.Barbara Hinckle, 57, of Hancock alleged in her suit that Dr. Keith D. Falcao ignored another doctor's medical advice that she lose weight before undergoing the ileostomy operation. She claimed that Falcao also made errors during the operation.As a result of problems stemming from the 1988 operation, Hinckle, who worked in health administration as a physician's assistant, requires intravenous rehydration 15 hours a day, according to her lawyer, Laurence Marder.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | February 27, 2005
Is it unsanitary to kiss your dog or cat on the mouth? Does it cause colds, sore throats or other problems? It is unlikely that you will catch a cold from your dog or cat. They're not susceptible to these viruses the way humans are. Kissing your pet is not sanitary, though. Just think how an animal grooms itself. Some germs could be transmitted from pet to owner. Cats can carry Pasteurella multocida, which can cause sinus infections in humans. Dogs might be infected with Bordetella bronchoseptica (kennel cough)
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Erika Niedowski and David Nitkin and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2004
The 8-week-old son of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and first lady Kendel Ehrlich was recovering yesterday from emergency surgery to clear a blockage between his stomach and small intestine that was causing him to regurgitate food. Joshua Taylor Ehrlich is expected to recover fully from the condition, which afflicts about one in 1,000 babies, doctors said. The procedure was performed Sunday evening at the University of Maryland Medical Center by Dr. Roger Voigt, chief of pediatric surgery there.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Baffling but true: Not all writers hold editors in high esteem. But the poor dears sometimes have difficulty expressing themselves clearly. To help them out, I have constructed some "your editor" insults, on the model of "yo mama" invective. Contributors are invited to exercise their imaginations through the comments function. Your editor's so dumb, she thinks hapax legomenon is the name of a skin disease.* Your editor's so dumb, he thinks alumnis is a plural.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 28, 2002
ANOTHER SCHOOL year begins in Baltimore County, and Stephanie Brittingham attends by telephone. Her teachers came to her Parkville house Monday, gave her books and set up a speaker phone on the desk in her bedroom. Yesterday, Stephanie dialed up a science lesson at 10 a.m., math at 11 and social studies at 1 in the afternoon. She's a sixth-grader who won't see the inside of a classroom or study with classmates this year, and that's how it goes when you're 11 and tethered to an intravenous tube, on the long end of a wait for an organ transplant.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 1995
I am an elderly woman who lives alone. A family with two young children just moved in next door. They seemed nice, and I knew the parents would be busy unpacking, so I invited the children over for milk and cookies and to watch a video. Now I have found out the children have pinworms! Am I going to get them?It is highly unlikely that you will get pinworms from your new young friends. Just wash your hands carefully before you eat. And do have the children over again! Pinworms are quite common among children, and the fact that your neighbor children have them does not imply that they are not clean.
FEATURES
By Euna Lhee and Euna Lhee,Sun reporter | July 31, 2008
Maryland researchers have identified a key receptor in the intestine that can trigger celiac disease, and they hope their findings can be applied to other autoimmune disorders, such as Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Celiac disease is a digestive disorder that damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of nutrients from food. People with the condition cannot process a protein called gluten - most commonly found in grains such as wheat, rye and barley, but also found in medicines and vitamins.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | February 27, 2005
Is it unsanitary to kiss your dog or cat on the mouth? Does it cause colds, sore throats or other problems? It is unlikely that you will catch a cold from your dog or cat. They're not susceptible to these viruses the way humans are. Kissing your pet is not sanitary, though. Just think how an animal grooms itself. Some germs could be transmitted from pet to owner. Cats can carry Pasteurella multocida, which can cause sinus infections in humans. Dogs might be infected with Bordetella bronchoseptica (kennel cough)
NEWS
By Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | February 6, 2005
I've heard that a daily dose of aspirin might lead to an ulcer due to the corrosive effect of aspirin on the lining of the stomach. Enteric-coated aspirin is sometimes recommended. I understand that it results in the aspirin dissolving in the intestine rather than the stomach. Why is it better to get a hole in your intestine thanyour stomach? Holes in any part of the digestive tract are undesirable! Dr. Waqar Qureshi, chief of endoscopy at Baylor College of Medicine, says that doctors mostly ignored the effect of medications on the small intestine until recently because it was so hard to examine.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Erika Niedowski and David Nitkin and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2004
The 8-week-old son of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and first lady Kendel Ehrlich was recovering yesterday from emergency surgery to clear a blockage between his stomach and small intestine that was causing him to regurgitate food. Joshua Taylor Ehrlich is expected to recover fully from the condition, which afflicts about one in 1,000 babies, doctors said. The procedure was performed Sunday evening at the University of Maryland Medical Center by Dr. Roger Voigt, chief of pediatric surgery there.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 28, 2002
ANOTHER SCHOOL year begins in Baltimore County, and Stephanie Brittingham attends by telephone. Her teachers came to her Parkville house Monday, gave her books and set up a speaker phone on the desk in her bedroom. Yesterday, Stephanie dialed up a science lesson at 10 a.m., math at 11 and social studies at 1 in the afternoon. She's a sixth-grader who won't see the inside of a classroom or study with classmates this year, and that's how it goes when you're 11 and tethered to an intravenous tube, on the long end of a wait for an organ transplant.
NEWS
By Liz Szabo and Liz Szabo,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 2, 2001
RICHMOND, Va. - Now you can get continuous news coverage of your own intestines. Doctors have developed a camera-in-a-pill that, after being swallowed, provides color pictures of a patient's digestive tract. These miniature "gut cams" are already being used at Henrico Doctors' Hospitals in the Richmond area. The disposable devices are only an inch long, like a supersize vitamin. Yet - using technology that sounds like something out of the sci-fi films Fantastic Voyage or Innerspace - the pill's creators found room to squeeze in not only the camera but a radio transmitter, batteries and four strobe lights.
NEWS
By Liz Szabo and Liz Szabo,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 2, 2001
RICHMOND, Va. - Now you can get continuous news coverage of your own intestines. Doctors have developed a camera-in-a-pill that, after being swallowed, provides color pictures of a patient's digestive tract. These miniature "gut cams" are already being used at Henrico Doctors' Hospitals in the Richmond area. The disposable devices are only an inch long, like a supersize vitamin. Yet - using technology that sounds like something out of the sci-fi films Fantastic Voyage or Innerspace - the pill's creators found room to squeeze in not only the camera but a radio transmitter, batteries and four strobe lights.
FEATURES
By Euna Lhee and Euna Lhee,Sun reporter | July 31, 2008
Maryland researchers have identified a key receptor in the intestine that can trigger celiac disease, and they hope their findings can be applied to other autoimmune disorders, such as Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Celiac disease is a digestive disorder that damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of nutrients from food. People with the condition cannot process a protein called gluten - most commonly found in grains such as wheat, rye and barley, but also found in medicines and vitamins.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Kate Shatzkin contributed to this article | May 20, 1997
A Baltimore Circuit Court jury has awarded $7.7 million to a Washington County woman in a medical-malpractice trial that stemmed from an operation nine years ago in which she lost more than half of her small intestine.Barbara Hinckle, 57, of Hancock alleged in her suit that Dr. Keith D. Falcao ignored another doctor's medical advice that she lose weight before undergoing the ileostomy operation. She claimed that Falcao also made errors during the operation.As a result of problems stemming from the 1988 operation, Hinckle, who worked in health administration as a physician's assistant, requires intravenous rehydration 15 hours a day, according to her lawyer, Laurence Marder.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 1995
I am an elderly woman who lives alone. A family with two young children just moved in next door. They seemed nice, and I knew the parents would be busy unpacking, so I invited the children over for milk and cookies and to watch a video. Now I have found out the children have pinworms! Am I going to get them?It is highly unlikely that you will get pinworms from your new young friends. Just wash your hands carefully before you eat. And do have the children over again! Pinworms are quite common among children, and the fact that your neighbor children have them does not imply that they are not clean.
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