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BUSINESS
By Werner Renberg | November 28, 1993
When you buy shares of a well-managed, diversified equity mutual fund, you may hope to enjoy long-term performance exceeding that of the broad stock market, as measured by Standard & Poor's 500 Index.When you buy shares of an equity fund that is invested primarily in small companies' stocks, you do so because history tells you that it could fare a lot better than the large-company-dominated S&P 500 over the long run.But when you're in such a fund and the market for small-company stocks becomes turbulent, as it was again recently, should you be concerned?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Zaleski and For The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
In August 2006, Millennial Media -- a digital advertising company founded in Baltimore just two months prior -- made a move that shaped its future. The company's three co-founders took up office space inside the Emerging Technology Center (ETC), an incubator of startup technology companies that opened its doors in the Signature Building of the Can Company complex in Canton in 1999. Two years later, when Millennial Media moved out of the ETC and into the complex's adjacent Factory Building in October 2008, it was a company of 85 full-time employees.
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BUSINESS
By Jonathan Lansner and Jonathan Lansner,Orange County Register | May 10, 1992
Where have all the small stocks gone?Small-company stocks long have been the favorite of small investors. The lure of finding the next Apple Computer or MCI before the Wall Street pros latch on to it is tempting.But investors seeking to use lesser-known companies as the road to wealth today will find fewer and fewer traditional "small cap" stocks, as traders call them.A rally in companies with more modest market capitalization -- that is, share price multiplied by number of shares, or the value of all stock outstanding -- has turned many small caps into bigger fry or made them expensive by various market measures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
A listless west-side block of downtown Baltimore will undergo an energetic makeover if an idea generated by DIY-style theater troupes and local developer Winstead "Ted" Rouse comes to fruition. Their plan, submitted earlier this year when the Baltimore Development Corp. issued a request for proposals, envisions turning three abandoned buildings in the 400 block of N. Howard Street, between West Franklin and West Mulberry, into a hub of theater, dance and more. It could open as early as 2016.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2011
Monument Bank of Bethesda has received $11.4 million in federal funds to increase lending to small businesses, the U.S. Treasury announced Wednesday. The money comes from the Small Business Lending Fund, which was created by the Obama administration to encourage banks to loan money to companies to expand and create new jobs. Monument Bank is the second Maryland bank to receive money from the fund. Eagle Bancorp of Bethesda received $56.6 million in July. The fund provides capital to community banks that hold less than $10 billion in assets.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | September 16, 1991
When most of us think of corporate gifts to charity, we form a mental image of giants like IBM, which gave more than $150 million to charities last year. After all, such companies have entire departments devoted to boosting the company's community image through charitable donations.But think again. Small- and medium-sized companies, ranging from the mom-and-pop delicatessen to the entrepreneurial high-tech upstart, also donate a significant amount of money each year.Such smaller companies are providing the fuel to keep our economic engine running, economists note.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | November 21, 1992
NEW YORK -- As blue-chip stocks continue to lurch through a disappointing year, small-company stocks are jetting upward, thanks to confidence in the economy and worries about overseas economies.Two indexes that trace small stocks closed yesterday near all-time highs, with the NASDAQ Composite up 4.04 points, to 642.61, just a hair off its record of 644.92, set in February, and the Russell 2000, which follows generally smaller companies, up 1.09 points, to 209.77, also near its record high of 212.61, set in February.
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,Tribune Media Services | August 12, 2007
For two years, market watchers have been nagging investors to be careful about overdosing on small-company stocks, and to stop shunning large companies. But those who listened regretted it, as the smaller stocks continued to outperform - until recently. Now, small caps are lagging, and some experts say it could get much worse. As fear took hold of investors recently amid signs of a potential credit crunch and worsening housing recession, investors turned away from the most fragile companies, and small-cap mutual funds became fund investors' biggest losers.
BUSINESS
By Mark Stevens | March 4, 1991
When small business owners set out to improve their companies' performance, they often look to the Fords and the Exxons of the world for inspiration. Case histories about the inner workings of the billion-dollar multinationals are supposed to guide the little guys to "do it like the giants do."But this practice, based on the theory that big is better, fails to consider that, pound for pound, small companies often are more creative than the Fortune 500 they're supposed to emulate.The truth is, American business may be well served by taking a page or two from their smaller brethren.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | December 10, 2005
Organizations representing hundreds of venture capital, health care and technology companies are calling for changes to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which they contend is stifling business investment and innovation. A letter that industry groups mailed to the Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday criticized the provision of the act that requires companies to take certain steps to verify their accounting procedures and reports as "one-size-fits-all." The act puts "disproportionate cost burdens" on smaller public companies, according to the letter.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
As federal agencies pull back on spending, 7Delta's strategy is thinking big. The Columbia information technology firm, which grew by focusing on work for one federal agency, is going after larger contracts and broadening its reach. It's a diversification tactic that other federal contractors at the smaller end of the scale are trying, too: expansion in a time of retrenchment. Deltek, a Virginia IT firm that provides services to government contractors and other businesses, is seeing that trend - but warns that it cuts both ways.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
Federal workers aren't the only ones anxious about looming budget cuts. Federal contractors - plentiful in Maryland - have a lot at stake, too. Mark Amtower, who helps companies market products and services to the federal government, thinks there's plenty of reason to worry. The most obvious challenge on the horizon is sequestration - the automatic cuts of $109 billion annually that are due to start in January if Congress cannot agree on deficit reduction. But Amtower sees other changes as well that he says make it more difficult for small companies selling, or hoping to sell, to Uncle Sam. He started his firm, Amtower & Co., in 1985 and runs it from his Highland home with his wife, Mary Ellen.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2012
Devin Partlow had a comfortable defense contractor job, earning six figures as a computer programmer. But the 27-year-old Severn resident also had a side project that he grew to love more: a mobile app that helps connect people and plan activities and events. What came next for Partlow is similar to what's happening across the country, as a fresh generation of entrepreneurs embark on Internet ventures, increasingly with the assistance of new programs geared toward helping startups.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2012
Ann Lansinger has been a part of Baltimore's startup scene for three decades. In fact, she was involved in local tech startups before there ever was much of a scene. Lansinger, who has run Baltimore's Emerging Technology Center in Canton since 1999, is to retire April 5. She will leave behind a record of growth — and an energized tech culture in Baltimore. Lansinger has been a shepherd and witness to some of the region's most promising technology firms and their progress over the last few decades.
NEWS
By Bob Paff | August 18, 2011
As the economy continues to struggle and America tries to reclaim its place in the global economic and financial markets, small business once again is left holding the proverbial bag. As attorney and author Steve Strauss asked in his Aug. 8 column in USA Today, how do we pump the entrepreneurial well even deeper in the face of so much legislative, political, and global red tape? With unemployment constantly hovering around 9 percent and fear grasping every American from Main Street to Wall Street, how does the small business owner stand a chance of survival, let alone the ability to grow and prosper?
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2011
Monument Bank of Bethesda has received $11.4 million in federal funds to increase lending to small businesses, the U.S. Treasury announced Wednesday. The money comes from the Small Business Lending Fund, which was created by the Obama administration to encourage banks to loan money to companies to expand and create new jobs. Monument Bank is the second Maryland bank to receive money from the fund. Eagle Bancorp of Bethesda received $56.6 million in July. The fund provides capital to community banks that hold less than $10 billion in assets.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1996
Crystal PCNumber crunchers are turning into soothsayers as accountants are adding business planning to their job descriptions, Robert Half International found in a survey of 150 executives. Seventy-one percent said accountants are taking more of a strategic role, said Half, an employment firm. And 66 percent said accountants have a more important place in their companies than they did five years ago.On guardSmall companies should protect themselves against the risk of a major client defecting and taking a large chunk of business elsewhere, says Black Enterprise magazine.
BUSINESS
By Edmund L. Andrews and Edmund L. Andrews,New York Times News Service | May 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of Labor Lynn Martin proposed changing the nation's pension laws yesterday to encourage the creation of retirement programs for about 42 million workers who are currently not covered.In general, the administration proposes simplifying the rules and reducing the administrative burden for employers, particularly small businesses.But critics, including groups representing retirees, say the changes would do little to encourage employers to make more generous pension contributions and would mainly benefit highly paid employees who rely on their own savings.
NEWS
February 1, 2010
President Obama pledged to make job creation a top priority in his State of the Union address, and his appearance at a Highlandtown machine shop last Friday confirmed it. But while his proposed $5,000-per-new-job tax credit for small businesses sounds helpful, it's a relatively paltry incentive and ripe for abuse from firms that are bound to find ways to collect the credit without necessarily expanding their payroll. If voters are angry that so much money went to bail out banks, will they necessarily be excited by the prospect of small businesses getting a one-year $33 billion hand-out and Social Security discount?
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