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Small Claims Court

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BUSINESS
By ILYCE GLINK | February 1, 2008
My wife owns a home that we would prefer to sell, but it is a rental property at the moment. The renter has informed us that she has bought a new house and will be leaving at the beginning of February so she will not be giving her 30-day notice and she does not intend to pay anything for January. A friend suggested that we put a lien on the new house so she won't be able to close on the house until she pays us. The rent is $1,700. Is that worth the amount of lawyers' fees it would cost to do all that?
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
Maryland's District Courts are putting a freeze on about 900 debt-collection lawsuits after the local company that filed them tried and failed to get a license. Sunshine Financial Group, a Catonsville-based firm that buys consumer debts and collects primarily by suing, was turned down for a collection agency license this month by the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation. The agency said the company filed affidavits in court cases that "misled and deceived both consumer defendants and the courts" about key issues, from the amount of the debt owed to whether the company could prove it had the right to collect.
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NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2002
The Maryland Senate gave final approval yesterday to a bill that would make it easier for people to settle small-claims disputes. In a unanimous vote, the Senate agreed to increase to $5,000 the amount a person could sue for in a small-claims case. The House of Delegates approved the same bill in February, and the measure now goes to Gov. Parris N. Glendening. The governor vetoed a similar proposal last year at the urging of the Maryland Trial Lawyers Association, and it is unclear whether he would do the same this year.
NEWS
By Mike Schaefer | November 15, 2009
Each day, the District Court at 700 E. Patapsco St. has a roomful of parking ticket culprits who feel they are not guilty, or cannot afford the fines and penalties, or are gambling on the officer not showing up (so they win by default). About a dozen enforcement officers spend one to two hours to see that justice is done. The judge (with a $127,252 salary) is supported by two clerks and two bailiffs (the latter costing $35,000 a year each). Some judges are in good moods, some not; this is generally the least-desired of judicial assignments.
BUSINESS
By George B. Laurent | March 20, 1994
One of the prime causes of disputes between tenants and landlords involves charges to the security deposit. If these disputes cannot be resolved and the sum involved is $2,500 or less, the tenant can sue in Small Claims Court.This is a relatively informal and simple procedure in which most tenants are able to represent themselves without the aid of a lawyer.The suit should be filed as soon as possible, but within three years of the time the dispute arises, in the county where the rental property is located.
NEWS
By Mike Schaefer | November 15, 2009
Each day, the District Court at 700 E. Patapsco St. has a roomful of parking ticket culprits who feel they are not guilty, or cannot afford the fines and penalties, or are gambling on the officer not showing up (so they win by default). About a dozen enforcement officers spend one to two hours to see that justice is done. The judge (with a $127,252 salary) is supported by two clerks and two bailiffs (the latter costing $35,000 a year each). Some judges are in good moods, some not; this is generally the least-desired of judicial assignments.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
Maryland's District Courts are putting a freeze on about 900 debt-collection lawsuits after the local company that filed them tried and failed to get a license. Sunshine Financial Group, a Catonsville-based firm that buys consumer debts and collects primarily by suing, was turned down for a collection agency license this month by the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation. The agency said the company filed affidavits in court cases that "misled and deceived both consumer defendants and the courts" about key issues, from the amount of the debt owed to whether the company could prove it had the right to collect.
NEWS
December 15, 1992
Wage LawsGreat article by Kim Clark on state wage laws (Nov. 29). While this problem has always been around it is indeed growing.I have lost money from one company and have since run into several people who have also. In my case I was working for a large multinational in the middle of a corporate downsizing.When my time came to go out the door, the exit interviewer had me sign a waiver even before being informed of any pay, benefit continuation or job search help. The waiver of course was a disclaimer to release the company from any wrongdoing and a promise that I would never bad mouth said company.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 9, 1993
SEATTLE -- A Washington state man says it cost hi $1,153.54 to quit smoking, and he wants the Philip Morris Cos. to pick up the bill.Al Deskiewicz, 50, a design engineer from Kirkland, told Judge Linda K. Jacke yesterday that the tobacco company should pay for the the cost of his doctor's visits, nicotine patches and health club membership.Judge Jacke said she would rule on the case in two weeks.By bringing his case to small claims court, where cases are restricted to suits that do not exceed $2,500 and where lawyers are not permitted to argue cases, anti-smoking advocates said Mr. Deskiewicz was able to represent himself without the hefty ++ legal expenses that others have incurred against the large tobacco manufacturer.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 7, 2003
House panel OKs effort to raise limit in small-claims court The House Judiciary Committee approved a bill last night that would increase the amount a person could sue for in small-claims court to $5,000. The effort to increase the limit from $2,500 is part of a nationwide campaign to make small-claims court more accessible to consumers and small-business owners. Both the House and Senate approved identical legislation the past two years, but Gov. Parris N. Glendening vetoed it both times at the urging of the Maryland Trial Lawyers Association.
BUSINESS
By ILYCE GLINK | February 1, 2008
My wife owns a home that we would prefer to sell, but it is a rental property at the moment. The renter has informed us that she has bought a new house and will be leaving at the beginning of February so she will not be giving her 30-day notice and she does not intend to pay anything for January. A friend suggested that we put a lien on the new house so she won't be able to close on the house until she pays us. The rent is $1,700. Is that worth the amount of lawyers' fees it would cost to do all that?
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2002
The Maryland Senate gave final approval yesterday to a bill that would make it easier for people to settle small-claims disputes. In a unanimous vote, the Senate agreed to increase to $5,000 the amount a person could sue for in a small-claims case. The House of Delegates approved the same bill in February, and the measure now goes to Gov. Parris N. Glendening. The governor vetoed a similar proposal last year at the urging of the Maryland Trial Lawyers Association, and it is unclear whether he would do the same this year.
BUSINESS
By George B. Laurent | March 20, 1994
One of the prime causes of disputes between tenants and landlords involves charges to the security deposit. If these disputes cannot be resolved and the sum involved is $2,500 or less, the tenant can sue in Small Claims Court.This is a relatively informal and simple procedure in which most tenants are able to represent themselves without the aid of a lawyer.The suit should be filed as soon as possible, but within three years of the time the dispute arises, in the county where the rental property is located.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 9, 1993
SEATTLE -- A Washington state man says it cost hi $1,153.54 to quit smoking, and he wants the Philip Morris Cos. to pick up the bill.Al Deskiewicz, 50, a design engineer from Kirkland, told Judge Linda K. Jacke yesterday that the tobacco company should pay for the the cost of his doctor's visits, nicotine patches and health club membership.Judge Jacke said she would rule on the case in two weeks.By bringing his case to small claims court, where cases are restricted to suits that do not exceed $2,500 and where lawyers are not permitted to argue cases, anti-smoking advocates said Mr. Deskiewicz was able to represent himself without the hefty ++ legal expenses that others have incurred against the large tobacco manufacturer.
NEWS
December 15, 1992
Wage LawsGreat article by Kim Clark on state wage laws (Nov. 29). While this problem has always been around it is indeed growing.I have lost money from one company and have since run into several people who have also. In my case I was working for a large multinational in the middle of a corporate downsizing.When my time came to go out the door, the exit interviewer had me sign a waiver even before being informed of any pay, benefit continuation or job search help. The waiver of course was a disclaimer to release the company from any wrongdoing and a promise that I would never bad mouth said company.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1994
When Stephen Hannan became the county's consumer affairs administrator seven years ago, he "wasn't much on arbitration programs."Since then, he has become a believer. So much so that this week he asked the County Council to amend the county's consumer protection law to let consumers and businesses submit their disputes to binding arbitration.Currently, the only recourse consumers and businesses have if they are unable to resolve their differences is to take their case to small-claims court.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1998
A few weeks ago I addressed the concerns of landlord who sustained damage to her property from a tenant. The suggestions made to her -- and other landlords -- for future reference were to carefully check a prospective tenant's references and credit history, as well as to require a reasonable security deposit for protection.Well, the mailbag received a scolding from Charles Linkowich, who suggested that investigating tenants offers no guarantee that it will prevent a rental unit from being "destroyed" by them.
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