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By from Anne Arundel Medical Center, Harbor Hospital | October 31, 1991
Here are some tips that will help keep trick or treating safe:* Accompany small children or sketch 2 maps of the route kids will take; give one map to to the children, keep one at home. Make sure children stick to the route.* Visit only the homes of those you know.* Dress children in light colored or reflective clothing. Remove masks when crossing streets, or, better yet, create a face with makeup.* Hem costumes so small children won't trip.* Use the sidewalks, cross at intersections only.
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NEWS
August 21, 2014
As an Army officer in the late 1960s, I was trained in riot control, responding to the race riots in Washington, D.C. after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and just before my departure to Vietnam. I have a simple solution. You see the use of tear gas frequently. Did you know that you can mix with tear gas an element called DM, which is a vomiting agent? No need for bullets. No need for heavy armament. Just deploy a few canisters of a mixture of CS and DM. No one will die, but it won't be a pretty sight.
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NEWS
August 21, 2014
As an Army officer in the late 1960s, I was trained in riot control, responding to the race riots in Washington, D.C. after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and just before my departure to Vietnam. I have a simple solution. You see the use of tear gas frequently. Did you know that you can mix with tear gas an element called DM, which is a vomiting agent? No need for bullets. No need for heavy armament. Just deploy a few canisters of a mixture of CS and DM. No one will die, but it won't be a pretty sight.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
A woman was found killed and two small children located unharmed in Garrison late Tuesday when a Baltimore County Police tactical unit forced its way into a home following a call about a possible domestic dispute. Katie Hadel, 33, had been stabbed multiple times, and was pronounced dead at the scene, police said. A suspect, Jeffrey Michael Shiflett, also 33, of Annapolis, who had been in a previous relationship with Hadel, was located at 11:02 a.m. Wednesday walking along a road in Reisterstown, and taken into custody without incident, police said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
A woman was found killed and two small children located unharmed in Garrison late Tuesday when a Baltimore County Police tactical unit forced its way into a home following a call about a possible domestic dispute. Katie Hadel, 33, had been stabbed multiple times, and was pronounced dead at the scene, police said. A suspect, Jeffrey Michael Shiflett, also 33, of Annapolis, who had been in a previous relationship with Hadel, was located at 11:02 a.m. Wednesday walking along a road in Reisterstown, and taken into custody without incident, police said.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In the hierarchy of American occupations, it falls somewhere between hamburger flipper and truck driver.With a median income of $260 per week and meager, if any, benefits, the average child-care worker toils in an industry widely viewed as requiring few skills and minimal training, little continuity and scant oversight.But those who teach and care for small children will have their day at the White House today as President Clinton convenes the first-of-its-kind child-care meeting.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | December 8, 1992
With the holidays approaching, families with small children should take extra care to safeguard their homes against possible accidents.The Howard County General Hospital is offering a Child Safe Program tomorrow for parents, grandparents, early childhood educators and child care providers.The 2 1/2 -hour class focuses on accident prevention and emergency intervention, especially during Christmas and Hanukkah."It's a very stressful time," said Sarah Sherman, education specialist for Howard County General Hospital.
NEWS
November 11, 1997
IT IS rare for a judge to change a jury's verdict. But few people were even angry yesterday when Massachusetts Superior Court Judge Hiller Zobel reduced the second-degree murder conviction of a British au pair for the death of an infant in her care. The new verdict of involuntary manslaughter allowed the judge to reduce Louise Woodward's sentence to the 279 days she has already served in jail rather than a mandatory 15 years before being eligible for parole,Now the 19-year-old can go home to her village in Cheshire, where people were determined to see their daughter vindicated and rescued from an American justice system that has seemed to many Britons rigid and unjust.
NEWS
December 27, 1991
In keeping with its family focus, First Night Annapolis is offering a number of events for people with small children, between 4:30 and 5:30 p.m., plus some special dining opportunities.The fun starts at St. Mary's auditorium, when Mary Carter Smith, the famed Griot, or story teller, from Baltimore shares billing with master illusionist David Seebach.Carrying her cow tail switch, Carter tells stories from around the world. Seebach turns silk into live rabbits and makes ducks disappear, in an elaborate performance of close-up magic.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 28, 2004
JUST PAST 4 o'clock each afternoon, La Toria Fayall says goodbye to her three small children, locks the door to her rented rowhouse on East 37th Street, and begins the long trek to work. For the next two hours, her 10-year old, Danisha, will look after Dishaye, 6, and Tihjay, 3. Whatever God in heaven looks out for small children should cast a few protective glances their way. From 37th Street, Fayall walks to Ellerslie Avenue and waits for the No. 36 bus. The bus takes her to North and Greenmount, which is nobody's picnic area.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
Children clutching onto each other as they are hustled out of an elementary school. Parents weeping together in a school parking lot, police cars and ambulances flashing behind them. Police brandishing machine guns racing to a school. While the images from Friday's school shooting in Newtown, Conn., will haunt many, it is children - those who attend elementary schools much like the one where 20 students and six adults were killed - who may be the most profoundly affected, experts say. "Children are going to be shaken by this because it was at a school, a place that is supposed to be safe and comforting," said Dr. Patrick Kelly, a psychiatrist at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
NEWS
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2012
I don't know what to say about the shooting yesterday at Perry Hall High School . I can't imagine the circumstances that led to this day. I can't imagine the confusion of the freshmen trying to get their bearings on their first day of school. The anguish of parents knowing that someone had been shot and not being able to reach their children. The chaos faced by the teachers. The devastation experienced by the victim. It's just too much to process, to express. I was thinking about writing about how to talk to your children about school shootings, about bullying, about trauma, about kindness.
EXPLORE
February 7, 2012
After living here in Columbia for 34 years, I thought I had become inured to the oddities and missteps of amateur government. Well, a decorative fountain meant for children to play in the middle of Symphony Woods ("Reviews mixed for planned fountain," Feb. 2) certainly ranks up there with bad software decisions and water flumes that break down. Has anyone ever sat near that same kind of fountain now operating in Fairfax, Va.? What you see there is a constant parade of parents and children and noisy adolescents.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
A bill to ban the chemical bisphenol-A from baby bottles and infants' cups passed its final hurdle in the General Assembly on Thursday. The Senate passed the BPA bill 46-0, after the House passed an identical bill last week. Gov. Martin O'Malley hasn't reviewed the legislation, but a spokesman said he doesn't believe the governor would have objections. If the bill is signed, Maryland would become the fourth state to ban the chemical linked to developmental problems in young children, reproductive troubles in women and other diseases.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | January 18, 2009
When Barack and Michelle Obama move their family into the most storied address in America, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., they will be taking possession of the world's center of power and a museum of American presidential history. They will also be turning a historic house into their home. The Obama family moved from Chicago to Washington two weeks before the inauguration so daughters Malia, 10, and Sasha, 7, could start at Sidwell Friends, the private Quaker school. Blair House, the traditional pre-inaugural home for presidents-elect, wasn't ready yet. But the Obamas wanted to be in town for the start of the school semester, so they went to the Hay-Adams Hotel.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Jonathan Bor and Dennis O'Brien and Jonathan Bor,SUN REPORTERS | August 16, 2007
In a move sought by Baltimore health officials, federal regulators said yesterday that independent experts will hold hearings to evaluate safety concerns about cough and cold remedies for young children. The announcement comes months after the city health commissioner and other experts petitioned the Food and Drug Administration to prohibit drugmakers from marketing the remedies for infants and to require warning labels stating the products "have not been found to be safe or effective" for children under 6. Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, the health commissioner, said the FDA's decision to conduct two days of advisory panel hearings in October shows the agency is "taking the issue seriously."
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 6, 1992
At about 8:15 on a weekday morning, sidewalks around Taggart School in Philadelphia begin to fill with children. Crossing guard Marilyn Miller talks, but her eyes look elsewhere, darting, trying to catch the little ones before they cross the street where they shouldn't."
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | July 8, 1991
The smaller children laughed at a lot of what they saw at an early screening of ''Problem Child 2,'' but then small children are suckers for toilet humor, and the new film is loaded with it.It even includes a sequence in which the title character urinates into a pitcher of lemonade which is then consumed by the man next door.Talk about un-funny. You'd have to be a kid, a very small one, to find anything amusing in this film, an immeasurably offensive sequel to the original that appeared this time last year.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, Julie Scharper and Nick Shields and Mary Gail Hare, Julie Scharper and Nick Shields,Sun reporters | January 19, 2007
Three generations lived in the century-old wooden house with two chimneys in Harford County. Jerome Shropshire, a retired steelworker, and his wife, Annette, a homemaker, took care of their four young grandchildren while their daughter worked at a nearby supermarket and attended college classes. "He loved [the] children more than he loved himself," Joseph Shropshire Sr. said of his elder brother's bond with the grandchildren. "Wherever he went, they went." But a fire that started yesterday morning quickly spread and engulfed the Abingdon house, killing Shropshire, 72, and four others: a woman in her 60s, two preschool-age boys, and an 8-month-old girl, fire officials said.
NEWS
By Julie Deardorff and Julie Deardorff,Chicago Tribune | November 17, 2006
It's the beginning of the influenza season, and despite the annual warnings from public health officials, I won't be getting a flu shot. Nor will I haul my doctor-phobic toddler into the pediatrician's office for one. I know the flu virus can cause complications in vulnerable populations with chronic conditions, and we're both considered high risk. I'm pregnant, and for the first time this year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also suggests that healthy but germ-spreading children ages 2 through 5 receive flu shots.
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