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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
Doris J. Roseborough, a retired Small Business Administration executive supervisor, died Nov. 15 of an aneurysm at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The longtime Ashburton resident was 73. The former Doris Richardson was born in Essex, N.C., and moved with her family to South Baltimore. After graduating from Carver Vocational-Technical High School in 1956, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1961 from Morgan State University. Mrs. Roseborough worked for the Small Business Administration in Washington as an executive supervisor for 31 years before retiring in the mid-1980s.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The federal government steered $83.1 billion in contracts to small businesses last year, meeting a goal intended to boost those firms for the first time in eight years, according to a report released by the Obama administration Friday. Just over 23 percent of $355 billion in federal contracting dollars last year went to small companies, up about 1 percentage point from 2012, according to the Small Business Administration. The higher share was driven in large part by an overall decrease in federal spending.
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BUSINESS
By Robert Manor and Robert Manor,Chicago Tribune | August 30, 2006
CHICAGO -- The new head of the Small Business Administration, a former executive at a decidedly big business, says his agency must do a better job of helping minority, rural and inner-city small companies grow. "That's a huge social opportunity for us," said Steven C. Preston, who became the SBA's administrator in June. Preston is taking on a small agency with vocal critics who claim that too many federal contracts are going to giant businesses when they should be allocated to small companies.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
Tracy Balazs, the president and CEO of an Annapolis-based staffing firm, was named Entrepreneurial Success of the Year last month by the Baltimore district office of the U.S. Small Business Administration. She founded the company, Federal Staffing Resources LLC, in 2004. It now employs more than 300 people, has eight offices across the country and generates more than $30 million in revenue annually. The company mainly provides health professionals to government outfits, including the Army, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Federal Aviation Administration, though FSR recently expanded its operations to the staffing of private companies.
BUSINESS
By Abbe Gluck and Abbe Gluck,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1996
Barring unlikely rejection from the Small Business Administration's national office, a loan program designed especially for women will soon be coming to Baltimore.SBA's Women's Prequalification Pilot Loan Program provides female entrepreneurs with intermediary consultants who help them prepackage their loans before they go to the bank. The prepackaging process includes everything from formulating a business plan to analyzing the market to assembling personal financial data. When the package is ready, SBA reviews it and usually writes a "prequal letter," throwing its support behind the project.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2011
The federal Small Business Administration said Monday it would make loans available to businesses in Carroll and Frederick counties that were affected by last summer's drought. Small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives and nonprofit organizations can apply for loans of up to $2 million, with interest rates ranging from 3 to 4 percent. Farmers were not eligible for the SBA program, but they received support last fall from the USDA Farm Service Agency. Potential applicants to the SBA program can visit the agency's secure website to apply: https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela/.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The federal government steered $83.1 billion in contracts to small businesses last year, meeting a goal intended to boost those firms for the first time in eight years, according to a report released by the Obama administration Friday. Just over 23 percent of $355 billion in federal contracting dollars last year went to small companies, up about 1 percentage point from 2012, according to the Small Business Administration. The higher share was driven in large part by an overall decrease in federal spending.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
In his attempt to prove why we don't need a Labor Department, Matt Patterson ("Why do we need a Labor Department?" Mar. 22) unwittingly demonstrates just the opposite. Free market advocates like Mr. Patterson love to lionize the business sector, and there are indeed government agencies and programs that support and promote the employer side of the labor market. Commerce and the Small Business Administration come to mind. Even the Agriculture Department is charged with, among other goals, expanding markets for American agricultural products.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Julie Lenzer Kirk, who heads Howard County's Maryland Center for Entrepreneurship, has been to the White House for briefings before but has never been called upon to speak there. She got her chance this week, amid the lofty ceilings and marble-paneled walls, delivering a presentation on a nearly year-old economic development effort. "I enjoy public speaking, so I wasn't really nervous, although the three-minute hard limit had me doing some last-minute mental jockeying as I watched the speakers before me," Kirk said.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | August 18, 1991
Francie M. Dalton bet her livelihood: She started her own company during a recession."Everything I own is being put on the line. You'd think that would keep me up at night. You'd think with this economy, it would scare me to death."It hasn't yet.Dalton, 38, is so confident her consulting business will succeed that she sees herself comfortable at age 65. Her house will be paid for, she'll have money to give nieces and nephews, and employees will be working across the country."I have envisioned everything I want to happen," she said.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
The Great Gourmet is Kimberly Scott's way of introducing the world to Maryland seafood. Her Eastern Shore company sells crab cakes, oysters and clams to wholesale and retail markets. In 2006, just three years after opening, The Great Gourmet was logging $1.8 million in revenue. Three years after that, Scott had revenue of $3.8 million, 15 employees and a place on Inc. Magazine's 500/5000 fastest-growing companies list. With her company expanding, Scott turned to Richard Loeffler at the Eastern Region Small Business and Technology Development Center at Salisbury University in 2009 for advice about a small-business loan that would allow her to move from rented space to a building of her own in Federalsburg with more freezer space.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
In his attempt to prove why we don't need a Labor Department, Matt Patterson ("Why do we need a Labor Department?" Mar. 22) unwittingly demonstrates just the opposite. Free market advocates like Mr. Patterson love to lionize the business sector, and there are indeed government agencies and programs that support and promote the employer side of the labor market. Commerce and the Small Business Administration come to mind. Even the Agriculture Department is charged with, among other goals, expanding markets for American agricultural products.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Julie Lenzer Kirk, who heads Howard County's Maryland Center for Entrepreneurship, has been to the White House for briefings before but has never been called upon to speak there. She got her chance this week, amid the lofty ceilings and marble-paneled walls, delivering a presentation on a nearly year-old economic development effort. "I enjoy public speaking, so I wasn't really nervous, although the three-minute hard limit had me doing some last-minute mental jockeying as I watched the speakers before me," Kirk said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
Doris J. Roseborough, a retired Small Business Administration executive supervisor, died Nov. 15 of an aneurysm at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The longtime Ashburton resident was 73. The former Doris Richardson was born in Essex, N.C., and moved with her family to South Baltimore. After graduating from Carver Vocational-Technical High School in 1956, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1961 from Morgan State University. Mrs. Roseborough worked for the Small Business Administration in Washington as an executive supervisor for 31 years before retiring in the mid-1980s.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2011
The federal Small Business Administration said Monday it would make loans available to businesses in Carroll and Frederick counties that were affected by last summer's drought. Small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives and nonprofit organizations can apply for loans of up to $2 million, with interest rates ranging from 3 to 4 percent. Farmers were not eligible for the SBA program, but they received support last fall from the USDA Farm Service Agency. Potential applicants to the SBA program can visit the agency's secure website to apply: https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela/.
NEWS
Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
A Marylander who served as George W. Bush 's No. 2 at the federal Small Business Administration — one whose name was out there four years ago as a possible running mate for then-Gov. Bob Ehrlich — has popped up in a less flattering political context. Melanie Sabelhaus appears in an infomercial that helped sink former Arizona Rep. J.D. Hayworth 's hopes of beating Senator John McCain in the Republican primary. In the infomercial, which McCain used as an issue in the campaign, Hayworth played pitchman for National Grants Conferences, a company that made dubious promises to hook people up with free government grants, earning it an F from the Better Business Bureau and getting it crosswise with 24 state attorneys general.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
The Great Gourmet is Kimberly Scott's way of introducing the world to Maryland seafood. Her Eastern Shore company sells crab cakes, oysters and clams to wholesale and retail markets. In 2006, just three years after opening, The Great Gourmet was logging $1.8 million in revenue. Three years after that, Scott had revenue of $3.8 million, 15 employees and a place on Inc. Magazine's 500/5000 fastest-growing companies list. With her company expanding, Scott turned to Richard Loeffler at the Eastern Region Small Business and Technology Development Center at Salisbury University in 2009 for advice about a small-business loan that would allow her to move from rented space to a building of her own in Federalsburg with more freezer space.
NEWS
Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
A Marylander who served as George W. Bush 's No. 2 at the federal Small Business Administration — one whose name was out there four years ago as a possible running mate for then-Gov. Bob Ehrlich — has popped up in a less flattering political context. Melanie Sabelhaus appears in an infomercial that helped sink former Arizona Rep. J.D. Hayworth 's hopes of beating Senator John McCain in the Republican primary. In the infomercial, which McCain used as an issue in the campaign, Hayworth played pitchman for National Grants Conferences, a company that made dubious promises to hook people up with free government grants, earning it an F from the Better Business Bureau and getting it crosswise with 24 state attorneys general.
BUSINESS
By Robert Manor and Robert Manor,Chicago Tribune | August 30, 2006
CHICAGO -- The new head of the Small Business Administration, a former executive at a decidedly big business, says his agency must do a better job of helping minority, rural and inner-city small companies grow. "That's a huge social opportunity for us," said Steven C. Preston, who became the SBA's administrator in June. Preston is taking on a small agency with vocal critics who claim that too many federal contracts are going to giant businesses when they should be allocated to small companies.
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