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By JOHN HILLEN | July 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Last year - a day after the fourth anniversary of 9/11 - a U.S. District Court sentenced Hemant Lakhani, a foreign arms dealer, to 47 years in prison for attempting to broker shoulder-fired anti-aircraft missiles to the purported representative of a Somali terrorist group. His client was, in fact, an FBI informant who had videotaped Mr. Lekhani recommending the missiles be used - "50 at one time, simultaneously" - to bring down commercial airliners in cities across the United States.
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NEWS
By Larry Kahaner and Rachel Stohl | December 3, 2006
Last week marked an unfortunate anniversary: The U.S. presence in Iraq is now longer than U.S. involvement in World War II. A major reason for the length of our stay in Iraq has been the widespread use of large numbers of small arms and light weapons as the primary tool of war. These weapons are devastating in terms of lives lost, but in Iraq, and many other conflict areas, small arms proliferation also has substantially hindered economic recovery....
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NEWS
By Larry Kahaner and Rachel Stohl | December 3, 2006
Last week marked an unfortunate anniversary: The U.S. presence in Iraq is now longer than U.S. involvement in World War II. A major reason for the length of our stay in Iraq has been the widespread use of large numbers of small arms and light weapons as the primary tool of war. These weapons are devastating in terms of lives lost, but in Iraq, and many other conflict areas, small arms proliferation also has substantially hindered economic recovery....
NEWS
July 6, 2006
U.S. blocks progress on small-arms limits John Hillen's column "Small arms, big danger" (Opinion * Commentary, July 3) rightly highlights the importance of the United Nations' ongoing Small Arms Review Conference in New York but neglects to mention the intransigence the United States has shown on future United Nations efforts on the issue. Mr. Hillen states that "the United States will make the case that its laws, practices and enforcement procedures are effective models other nations should follow."
NEWS
November 30, 1996
THE NATIONAL Rifle Association has done good work in its time representing the interests of gun owners and promoting gunmanship, target competition and firearms safety. But in recent years, with ever-greater stridency, it has become a trade association for the enlargement of markets for gun manufacturers and dealers. That, too, is a legitimate enterprise, but a very different one -- a difference NRA leaders have disguised with the language of ideological extremism.Its trade association motivation was never clearer than in its application to the United Nations for accreditation as a non-governmental organization (NGO)
NEWS
July 12, 2001
IT WAS A shocking statement, harmful to the national interest. But there was the Bush administration's undersecretary of state, John R. Bolton, speaking before a United Nations conference, opposing efforts to rein in the world's illicit arms trade. His negative statement led other delegates to conclude that Mr. Bolton and the Bush administration were trying to undermine the United Nations Conference on the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons, which meets in New York through July 20. Mr. Bolton was pandering to the gun lobby that contributed so heavily to the Bush campaign last year.
NEWS
July 6, 2006
U.S. blocks progress on small-arms limits John Hillen's column "Small arms, big danger" (Opinion * Commentary, July 3) rightly highlights the importance of the United Nations' ongoing Small Arms Review Conference in New York but neglects to mention the intransigence the United States has shown on future United Nations efforts on the issue. Mr. Hillen states that "the United States will make the case that its laws, practices and enforcement procedures are effective models other nations should follow."
NEWS
April 21, 1994
Military police at Fort Meade will begin unannounced searches of vehicles and people on the base beginning Saturday, a base spokesman said yesterday.Spokesman Julius Simms said the action follows a recent joint message from Secretary of the Army Togo D. West and Army Chief of Staff Gen. Gordon R. Sullivan about the importance of securing small arms, small arms parts, ammunition and explosives on Army bases.Night access to Fort Meade will also be restricted beginning June 1. Garrison Commander Col. Robert G. Morris III has directed that all access roads into the base be closed from 10:30 p.m. until 4:30 a.m. daily, except Mapes Road and Rockenbach Road.
NEWS
By Lois Hess | July 31, 2001
DURING LAST year's presidential campaign, the National Rifle Association bragged that a Bush victory would give the NRA an office in the West Wing of the White House. It is now clear that this office is open for business, albeit located a few blocks away in the attorney general's office. In a bout of blatant pandering to the NRA, Attorney General John Ashcroft has quickly begun to dismantle our gun safety laws. He recently announced that records of Brady gun law background checks - which have stopped more than 600,000 felons and other unauthorized persons from obtaining guns - would be destroyed just one day after a gun is sold.
TOPIC
By Michael Scardaville | July 15, 2001
It sounds like a fairly benign gathering, this U.N. conference - meeting in New York City until July 20 - on (ahem) "the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects." Searching for ways to curb the sale of arms to groups that provoke global instability? Great. Trying to keep the export of illegal guns under control? Fine. If it stops there - if the meeting goes no further than figuring out how best to mark guns to trace their ownership, to record what weapons enter and leave countries - it will be time well spent by the United Nations.
NEWS
By JOHN HILLEN | July 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Last year - a day after the fourth anniversary of 9/11 - a U.S. District Court sentenced Hemant Lakhani, a foreign arms dealer, to 47 years in prison for attempting to broker shoulder-fired anti-aircraft missiles to the purported representative of a Somali terrorist group. His client was, in fact, an FBI informant who had videotaped Mr. Lekhani recommending the missiles be used - "50 at one time, simultaneously" - to bring down commercial airliners in cities across the United States.
TOPIC
By Lucian K. Truscott IV and Lucian K. Truscott IV,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 14, 2003
MOSUL, Iraq - Maj. Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of the Army's 101st Airborne Division, has a large office on the second floor of what was once Saddam Hussein's northernmost palace in Mosul. He's got a desk and some chairs and a GI cot in an ornate room with marble floors and a tentlike ceiling fashioned from a latticework of wooden beading. The palace is yet another of Saddam Hussein's many-columned, Mussolini-style monsters, faced with the dun-colored polished stone and multihued marble he favored.
NEWS
By Lois Hess | July 31, 2001
DURING LAST year's presidential campaign, the National Rifle Association bragged that a Bush victory would give the NRA an office in the West Wing of the White House. It is now clear that this office is open for business, albeit located a few blocks away in the attorney general's office. In a bout of blatant pandering to the NRA, Attorney General John Ashcroft has quickly begun to dismantle our gun safety laws. He recently announced that records of Brady gun law background checks - which have stopped more than 600,000 felons and other unauthorized persons from obtaining guns - would be destroyed just one day after a gun is sold.
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | July 25, 2001
ATLANTA - Hordes of violent anti-thises and anti-thats couldn't break through police lines in Genoa to disrupt the policy musings of the heads of the eight big economies, but one man working from the inside, the president of the United States, pulled off the trick. George W. Bush stuck to his guns, holding that the international effort to cut greenhouse gases and thus mitigate global warming, as undertaken in the Kyoto Treaty, would be bad for some U.S. business and so the United States will have nothing to do with it. Japan and our European allies decided to work toward the Kyoto goals even with the world's biggest source of the problem opting out. There is a pattern developing in this administration.
NEWS
July 20, 2001
The state police do not condone racial profiling I must strongly denounce the letter "State police must root out profiling" (July 7), which inaccurately described how the Maryland State Police and its superintendent, Col. David Mitchell, have dealt with racial profiling. As a state trooper and the president of the Coalition of Black Maryland State Troopers Inc., I know first-hand the department has taken great steps to educate troopers about this important issue. Troopers receive lengthy training in diversity issues, especially racial profiling.
TOPIC
By Michael Scardaville | July 15, 2001
It sounds like a fairly benign gathering, this U.N. conference - meeting in New York City until July 20 - on (ahem) "the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects." Searching for ways to curb the sale of arms to groups that provoke global instability? Great. Trying to keep the export of illegal guns under control? Fine. If it stops there - if the meeting goes no further than figuring out how best to mark guns to trace their ownership, to record what weapons enter and leave countries - it will be time well spent by the United Nations.
NEWS
July 20, 2001
The state police do not condone racial profiling I must strongly denounce the letter "State police must root out profiling" (July 7), which inaccurately described how the Maryland State Police and its superintendent, Col. David Mitchell, have dealt with racial profiling. As a state trooper and the president of the Coalition of Black Maryland State Troopers Inc., I know first-hand the department has taken great steps to educate troopers about this important issue. Troopers receive lengthy training in diversity issues, especially racial profiling.
TOPIC
By Lucian K. Truscott IV and Lucian K. Truscott IV,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 14, 2003
MOSUL, Iraq - Maj. Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of the Army's 101st Airborne Division, has a large office on the second floor of what was once Saddam Hussein's northernmost palace in Mosul. He's got a desk and some chairs and a GI cot in an ornate room with marble floors and a tentlike ceiling fashioned from a latticework of wooden beading. The palace is yet another of Saddam Hussein's many-columned, Mussolini-style monsters, faced with the dun-colored polished stone and multihued marble he favored.
NEWS
July 12, 2001
IT WAS A shocking statement, harmful to the national interest. But there was the Bush administration's undersecretary of state, John R. Bolton, speaking before a United Nations conference, opposing efforts to rein in the world's illicit arms trade. His negative statement led other delegates to conclude that Mr. Bolton and the Bush administration were trying to undermine the United Nations Conference on the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons, which meets in New York through July 20. Mr. Bolton was pandering to the gun lobby that contributed so heavily to the Bush campaign last year.
NEWS
November 30, 1996
THE NATIONAL Rifle Association has done good work in its time representing the interests of gun owners and promoting gunmanship, target competition and firearms safety. But in recent years, with ever-greater stridency, it has become a trade association for the enlargement of markets for gun manufacturers and dealers. That, too, is a legitimate enterprise, but a very different one -- a difference NRA leaders have disguised with the language of ideological extremism.Its trade association motivation was never clearer than in its application to the United Nations for accreditation as a non-governmental organization (NGO)
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