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TRAVEL
By Jill Yesko and Jill Yesko,Special to the Sun | February 27, 2000
The scramble to be the top man on the totem pole isn't limited to corporate America. For hundreds of years, legions of castellers -- men, women and children in the Spanish region of Catalonia -- have been climbing over themselves to form castells, human towers that can be as high as five-story buildings. The towers formed by castellers resemble human architectural creations, flesh and bone skyscrapers erected and dismantled by well-practiced teams in less than five minutes. The fanciful structures can include more than 50 people and rise as tall as a small apartment building.
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TRAVEL
By Jill Yesko and Jill Yesko,Special to the Sun | February 27, 2000
The scramble to be the top man on the totem pole isn't limited to corporate America. For hundreds of years, legions of castellers -- men, women and children in the Spanish region of Catalonia -- have been climbing over themselves to form castells, human towers that can be as high as five-story buildings. The towers formed by castellers resemble human architectural creations, flesh and bone skyscrapers erected and dismantled by well-practiced teams in less than five minutes. The fanciful structures can include more than 50 people and rise as tall as a small apartment building.
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NEWS
By Joe Surkiewicz and Joe Surkiewicz,Contributing Writer | April 2, 1992
Everyone knows the bright side to living in a small apartment -- the rent is cheaper, utility bills are lower and, last but not least, a smaller living space is a lot easier to clean.But when it comes to tasteful -- and practical -- decorating schemes, stylishly outfitting a small one-bedroom or studio apartment can be tough. The biggest challenge is figuring out how to pack plenty of design power into rooms that must serve double, or even triple, duty as living room, bedroom, dining area and at- home gym.Then there's the problem of storage.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | December 15, 1996
Regular readers of this column must know that I'm smitten with kitchens. Probably because I love to cook -- and owing also to my enjoyment of hanging out at home with friends and family -- no other room makes me feel more contented than an airy, efficient and comfortable kitchen.I'm fortunate to have just such a space. But I realize that not everyone is so blessed, especially those city dwellers who must cope with truly minuscule areas allocated for food preparation and storage.While it's often difficult and frustrating to work in that kind of kitchen, this need not be a permanent condition.
FEATURES
By RITA ST.CLAIR and RITA ST.CLAIR,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 1, 1991
Q: I occasionally entertain four to six people for dinner in my small apartment. Because it can get rather crowded, I'm thinking about buying some multipurpose furniture, preferably not in contemporary style. Do you have any suggestions for how such pieces should be arranged?A: The first step is to draw a detailed floor plan. It should indicate the spots where you prefer to place your main furnishings. The plan also ought to designate any adjacent areas, such as a hallway or a foyer, in which you might be able to situate a small piece of multipurpose furniture that can easily be moved into position for a dinner party.
NEWS
By Joe Surkiewicz and By Joe Surkiewicz,Contributing Writer | April 2, 1992
Not too long ago, most apartment dwellers were students, singles and young married couples saving for their first house.Lately, however, a new category of people is swelling the ranks of apartment residents: "empty nesters" -- married couples with kids who have grown and left home. Faced with a house filled with unused bedrooms, more and more empty nesters are opting for the convenience and ease that apartment living affords.Yet empty nesters face a special problem in making the transition from a house to an apartment.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | December 15, 1996
Regular readers of this column must know that I'm smitten with kitchens. Probably because I love to cook -- and owing also to my enjoyment of hanging out at home with friends and family -- no other room makes me feel more contented than an airy, efficient and comfortable kitchen.I'm fortunate to have just such a space. But I realize that not everyone is so blessed, especially those city dwellers who must cope with truly minuscule areas allocated for food preparation and storage.While it's often difficult and frustrating to work in that kind of kitchen, this need not be a permanent condition.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | November 24, 1996
Some pieces of furniture have a charm all their own because they're seen as throwbacks to an earlier, nostalgically remembered era.Perhaps you recall the tete-a-tete sofa, that serpentine-shaped love seat that kept a couple side by side (or head to head) even as they faced in opposite directions.I'm thinking, too, of the tea trolley, or bar cart as it is often called in America. It used to -- and still does -- offer a most convenient means of transporting dishes, glasses and serving plates from the kitchen to the dining room table.
SPORTS
By Samantha Stevenson and Samantha Stevenson,New York Times News Service | November 4, 1990
MARINA DEL REY, Calif. -- Bo likes to cook cabbage and prizes his recipes for cornbread, biscuits and catfish. He plays a mean game of hide-and-seek, hates to give autographs when he is with his family, and loves toy stores."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 9, 1998
A 2-year-old boy who fell from a slide in a Columbia playground last month died of a heart defect, the state medical examiner said yesterday.Dai'mon Akeil Anderson-Fowlkes was being supervised about noon April 7 by his 20-year-old uncle while playing at a small apartment-complex playground in Harper's Choice village.The boy fell from a slide and was found by paramedics near the patio of his family's apartment in the 5400 block of Harper's Farm Road. The cause of death was a coronary artery anomaly, the medical examiner said.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | November 24, 1996
Some pieces of furniture have a charm all their own because they're seen as throwbacks to an earlier, nostalgically remembered era.Perhaps you recall the tete-a-tete sofa, that serpentine-shaped love seat that kept a couple side by side (or head to head) even as they faced in opposite directions.I'm thinking, too, of the tea trolley, or bar cart as it is often called in America. It used to -- and still does -- offer a most convenient means of transporting dishes, glasses and serving plates from the kitchen to the dining room table.
NEWS
By Joe Surkiewicz and By Joe Surkiewicz,Contributing Writer | April 2, 1992
Not too long ago, most apartment dwellers were students, singles and young married couples saving for their first house.Lately, however, a new category of people is swelling the ranks of apartment residents: "empty nesters" -- married couples with kids who have grown and left home. Faced with a house filled with unused bedrooms, more and more empty nesters are opting for the convenience and ease that apartment living affords.Yet empty nesters face a special problem in making the transition from a house to an apartment.
NEWS
By Joe Surkiewicz and Joe Surkiewicz,Contributing Writer | April 2, 1992
Everyone knows the bright side to living in a small apartment -- the rent is cheaper, utility bills are lower and, last but not least, a smaller living space is a lot easier to clean.But when it comes to tasteful -- and practical -- decorating schemes, stylishly outfitting a small one-bedroom or studio apartment can be tough. The biggest challenge is figuring out how to pack plenty of design power into rooms that must serve double, or even triple, duty as living room, bedroom, dining area and at- home gym.Then there's the problem of storage.
FEATURES
By RITA ST.CLAIR and RITA ST.CLAIR,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 1, 1991
Q: I occasionally entertain four to six people for dinner in my small apartment. Because it can get rather crowded, I'm thinking about buying some multipurpose furniture, preferably not in contemporary style. Do you have any suggestions for how such pieces should be arranged?A: The first step is to draw a detailed floor plan. It should indicate the spots where you prefer to place your main furnishings. The plan also ought to designate any adjacent areas, such as a hallway or a foyer, in which you might be able to situate a small piece of multipurpose furniture that can easily be moved into position for a dinner party.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1995
A reprint of the famous Sistine Chapel scene between God and Adam is framed on a wall of Elizabeth Ann Murphy's small Cockeysville apartment. Nothing stands between the two of them: no priests or nuns, no bishop, and most of all, no lawyers. Just the supreme hand of the Creator and that of Man, trying so hard to touch.The picture, one of her favorite images, symbolizes the importance of religion in her life. And it expresses all the trauma and futility the earthly world has placed between Ms. Murphy and the Catholic church since middle-school teacher John Joseph Merzbacher raped and abused her 20 years ago.No matter that Merzbacher was sentenced to life in prison yesterday, by a judge who said he deserved "as much punishment as he could get" for his crimes.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 29, 1992
DREAM TEAM UPDATE -- Preparing for tonight's game against Germany, U.S.A. squad played 18 holes of golf before participating in traditional Barcelona pie-eating contest. Marring the afternoon: Thuggish Charles Barkley assaulted a caddie with a 9-iron, claiming the boy handed him the wrong club for an approach shot.HEARD IT THROUGH THE GRAPEVINE -- Irish cyclist Colleen Doherty lists Sally Thorner of NewsChannel 2 ("Friends You Can Turn To") as her idol, and plans to ask Ms. Thorner to provide room and board on her next visit to United States.
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