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By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Baltimore's chief federal judge said yesterday that he plans to retire to senior status because of health concerns, creating a second opening on the local bench to be filled by the Bush administration. U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin, known for his ultra-no-nonsense style in the courtroom and for his 1987 decision to vacate former Gov. Marvin Mandel's federal fraud conviction, said he would remain in his post until a successor is appointed. Smalkin, 56, did not elaborate on his health problems.
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NEWS
June 24, 2004
On June 15, 2004, GEORGE DUANE BERRY, of Sykesville; beloved husband of the late Virginia Mead Berry and son of the late George H. and Bertie Leatherwood Berry. Survived by niece and nephew, Kimberly and Michael Barranco, nephew Scott Smalkin, great-nieces Paget and Peyton Barranco, and sister-in-law, Celeste Smalkin. Memorial service at St. John's Episcopal Church, 3738 Butler Road, Glyndon, Friday, 10 A.M. Interment All Saints Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Carroll Hospital Center, 200 Memorial Avenue, Westminster, MD 21157.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Baltimore's chief federal judge said yesterday that he plans to retire to senior status because of health concerns, creating a second opening on the local bench to be filled by the Bush administration. U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin, known for his ultra-no-nonsense style in the courtroom and for his 1987 decision to vacate former Gov. Marvin Mandel's federal fraud conviction, said he would remain in his current post until a successor is appointed. Smalkin, 56, did not elaborate on his health problems.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Baltimore's chief federal judge said yesterday that he plans to retire to senior status because of health concerns, creating a second opening on the local bench to be filled by the Bush administration. U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin, known for his ultra-no-nonsense style in the courtroom and for his 1987 decision to vacate former Gov. Marvin Mandel's federal fraud conviction, said he would remain in his current post until a successor is appointed. Smalkin, 56, did not elaborate on his health problems.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Baltimore's chief federal judge said yesterday that he plans to retire to senior status because of health concerns, creating a second opening on the local bench to be filled by the Bush administration. U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin, known for his ultra-no-nonsense style in the courtroom and for his 1987 decision to vacate former Gov. Marvin Mandel's federal fraud conviction, said he will remain in his current post until a successor is appointed. Smalkin, 56, did not elaborate on his health problems.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 15, 1993
A federal judge yesterday sentenced seven members of a drug ring linked to 30 overdose deaths in Maryland to life without parole -- the largest number of defendants to receive life sentences in a single federal drug case, prosecutors said.Judge Frederic N. Smalkin in U.S. District Court also sentenced two other ring members to 24-year prison terms. All nine ring members were convicted of conspiracy to distribute fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opiate with the street name China White.The penalties were imposed under federal guidelines and mandatory minimum-sentencing laws that call for life terms because such a large amount of fentanyl -- more than 66 pounds -- was sold and deaths were linked to it.Judge Smalkin has frequently complained about federal sentencing laws from the bench.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 17, 1996
U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin will be honored today as outstanding teacher of the year by the Alumni Association of the University of Maryland School of Law.Judge Smalkin, who has been a faculty member since 1978 and teaches commercial law, is a 1971 graduate of the law school. He has been on the federal bench since 1986 and was U.S. magistrate for the District of Maryland for 10 years.The association's honors banquet begins at 6 p.m. at Westminster Hall, Fayette and Green streets in Baltimore.
NEWS
June 24, 2004
On June 15, 2004, GEORGE DUANE BERRY, of Sykesville; beloved husband of the late Virginia Mead Berry and son of the late George H. and Bertie Leatherwood Berry. Survived by niece and nephew, Kimberly and Michael Barranco, nephew Scott Smalkin, great-nieces Paget and Peyton Barranco, and sister-in-law, Celeste Smalkin. Memorial service at St. John's Episcopal Church, 3738 Butler Road, Glyndon, Friday, 10 A.M. Interment All Saints Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Carroll Hospital Center, 200 Memorial Avenue, Westminster, MD 21157.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2001
In a rare insanity finding, a federal judge acquitted yesterday a former Annapolis restaurateur charged with violating firearms laws last fall after police found a cache of weapons and military explosives in his waterfront home. U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin ordered that Eugenio A. Giolitti complete an extensive mental health treatment plan and agree to close monitoring. But the judge allowed Giolitti, who has been in federal custody since August, to go home with his wife. Eugenio and Mary Giolitti, known for their efforts to bring authentic Italian cooking to Annapolis, embraced after the brief hearing, then left the federal courthouse in Baltimore without comment.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2002
A Frederick County man who claimed to be a big-time concert promoter as he bilked investors of nearly $2 million was sent to federal prison yesterday and ordered to repay his victims, even though few expect ever to see the money fully returned. Carl A. Glorioso, 31, of New Market was sentenced to three years and a month in prison by Chief U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin, who also ordered Glorioso to make more than $1.3 million in restitution - in $500 monthly payments - once he is released.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Baltimore's chief federal judge said yesterday that he plans to retire to senior status because of health concerns, creating a second opening on the local bench to be filled by the Bush administration. U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin, known for his ultra-no-nonsense style in the courtroom and for his 1987 decision to vacate former Gov. Marvin Mandel's federal fraud conviction, said he will remain in his current post until a successor is appointed. Smalkin, 56, did not elaborate on his health problems.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Baltimore's chief federal judge said yesterday that he plans to retire to senior status because of health concerns, creating a second opening on the local bench to be filled by the Bush administration. U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin, known for his ultra-no-nonsense style in the courtroom and for his 1987 decision to vacate former Gov. Marvin Mandel's federal fraud conviction, said he would remain in his post until a successor is appointed. Smalkin, 56, did not elaborate on his health problems.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2002
The federal judge presiding over a $5 million defamation case against G. Gordon Liddy said yesterday that the Watergate figure had built a strong circumstantial case to back his claims that the infamous burglary was tied to a call-girl ring. Chief U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin refused for a second time to dismiss the case being heard in Baltimore. But he said Liddy's accuser had presented little evidence to show that Liddy was reckless in promoting his alternate theory of Watergate without admissions from key figures.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2002
A federal judge in Baltimore refused yesterday to dismiss a $5 million defamation lawsuit against Watergate figure G. Gordon Liddy, but the judge made clear he thought Liddy's accuser had presented a thin case. Chief U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin said attorneys for Ida "Maxie" Wells had presented scant evidence that Liddy wrongly relied on the word of a disbarred Washington lawyer as he investigated - and eventually embraced - an alternate theory of Watergate that links the infamous burglary to a call-girl ring.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2002
A Frederick County man who claimed to be a big-time concert promoter as he bilked investors of nearly $2 million was sent to federal prison yesterday and ordered to repay his victims, even though few expect ever to see the money fully returned. Carl A. Glorioso, 31, of New Market was sentenced to three years and a month in prison by Chief U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin, who also ordered Glorioso to make more than $1.3 million in restitution - in $500 monthly payments - once he is released.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2002
For the second time, a federal judge has rejected a Baltimore County liquor store's antitrust challenge to the Prohibition-era laws governing distribution of alcoholic beverages in Maryland. Beltway Fine Wine & Spirits in Towson, one of the state's largest package stores, argued that state efforts to promote temperance unfairly discouraged competition, but U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin ruled last week that Maryland's controls on liquor pricing and distribution are lawful. "The state's interest in protecting the health, safety and morals of its citizens, in this case, outweighs the federal interest in promoting economic competition in the alcoholic beverage industry," Smalkin said in his decision.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | November 22, 1992
From nude model to TV personality: Dale Madison now looks 0) to the soapsDale Madison's goals in life are these: To be a nude model, a TV personality and a soap star.So far, he's two for three."After I get a job on a soap," he says, chuckling, "I can retire."In the meantime, Mr. Madison is content to help the likes of soap diva Susan Lucci and exercise guru Richard Simmons sell their wares on the QVC cable shopping network."I've sold everything from frying pans to fur coats," says the 34-year-old host, who grew up in Baltimore.
NEWS
February 6, 1997
Some editions of The Sun yesterday carried an Associated Press report that erroneously stated that a preliminary injunction was granted to prevent the state from confiscating license plates issued to members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Instead, U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin in Baltimore granted a request for an expedited hearing of a motion for a preliminary injunction.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 2/06/97
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2001
In a rare insanity finding, a federal judge acquitted yesterday a former Annapolis restaurateur charged with violating firearms laws last fall after police found a cache of weapons and military explosives in his waterfront home. U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin ordered that Eugenio A. Giolitti complete an extensive mental health treatment plan and agree to close monitoring. But the judge allowed Giolitti, who has been in federal custody since August, to go home with his wife. Eugenio and Mary Giolitti, known for their efforts to bring authentic Italian cooking to Annapolis, embraced after the brief hearing, then left the federal courthouse in Baltimore without comment.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | April 19, 2001
WHEN Daniel Brashear arose from sleep each morning and inhaled his first gentle cigarette puff of the day, he imagined himself a citizen. This was a mistake, as Judge Frederic N. Smalkin informed him the other day. Brashear is merely a prison inmate, and distinctions have to be made. This is not always so easy. It is one thing for prisoners to have television sets in their cells so they can enjoy the civilizing effects of Jerry Springer. It is another thing to have radios in their cells to enjoy the gentle ambience of Howard Stern.
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