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By JONATHAN POWER | December 2, 1994
Chicago -- "There she is,'' gushes one travel writer about Chicago, ''rising suddenly like a gleaming, soaring fantasy -- a luminous shine of sheened metal, marble and glass towers, topped by exotic extravagances of domes, turrets, obelisks and spires.''Somewhere, over the rainbow, there is a city called Chicago that is like this. But from the ghettos of the west and south that city is a distant mirage. In the ghettos normal life has atrophied. Millions of black people live among abandoned apartment buildings with gaping windows and rat-infested doorways.
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NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2008
Carrying suitcases filled with teaching aids and carry-on bags stuffed with clothing and personal items, several Harford County educators traveled to Kenya last summer. This group of educators knew they were headed to a school where the children sharpened pencils with razor blades and used stone pebbles to count. "We have grown so used to having certain supplies when we teach that they don't have in Mathare Valley," said Nadine Wellington, principal of Mountain Christian School, who went to Kenya with a group of educators in 2007.
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NEWS
By Paul Salopek and Paul Salopek,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 4, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Postelection chaos swirled like a hurricane over this African capital yesterday, with a strange eye of calm reigning over an abandoned downtown while a storm of tear gas, hurled rocks and arsonists' smoke swept across the city's ring of slums. Heavily armed police blocked tens of thousands of angry marchers from attending an opposition rally in a central park, while the two leaders locked in the bitterest presidential election in Kenyan history showed no intention of negotiating their way out of a deepening political crisis that has killed at least 300 people.
NEWS
By Paul Salopek and Paul Salopek,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 4, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Postelection chaos swirled like a hurricane over this African capital yesterday, with a strange eye of calm reigning over an abandoned downtown while a storm of tear gas, hurled rocks and arsonists' smoke swept across the city's ring of slums. Heavily armed police blocked tens of thousands of angry marchers from attending an opposition rally in a central park, while the two leaders locked in the bitterest presidential election in Kenyan history showed no intention of negotiating their way out of a deepening political crisis that has killed at least 300 people.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2000
Gone are the days of the 1950s when about 10 children died in Baltimore every year from a gruesome condition known as "encephalopathy" - their brains swollen and bleeding from severe lead poisoning. Such fatalities are now all but unheard of, largely because of advances in testing and treatment. But doctors at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in East Baltimore note that many children in the city's slums are still receiving potentially lethal doses of lead paint that are all but certain to cause brain damage.
NEWS
By Sebastian Rotella and Sebastian Rotella,Los Angeles Times | April 22, 2007
ARGENTEUIL, France -- It is odd that Nicolas Sarkozy, the front-runner in France's presidential race, finds himself on the defensive in the immigrant slums that could play a key role in today's first-round election. As France's top law enforcement official, the hard-charging Sarkozy spent a lot of time in the nation's tense housing complexes. As a streetwise descendant of Hungarian and Greek-Jewish immigrants, he has a better instinctive understanding of those areas than most politicians, even some of his critics say. But just before the riots that shook France in October 2005, Sarkozy paid a nocturnal visit to a grim housing complex in this industrial city on the northwest periphery Paris.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,Sun Staff | December 19, 1999
Long before it was owned by the "King of Baltimore" -- before the rats moved in and the junkies bled all over the bathroom and the baby got poisoned in the parlor -- the Formstone rowhouse at 1120 N. Milton Ave. was already well on its way to rack and ruin.It had sheltered a succession of blue-collar immigrant families through most of the century, providing them a thin slice of the American dream, until a decade ago when it fell into the hands of Pick'n Chick'n Inc.James M. Stein, proprietor.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 21, 1993
They want to ban butt and booze billboards in the black slums and that's the one healthy industry left in this town.New York may do without school this year. Anything to cap the municipal budget.In the first fair test of free market economic reforms, commies won the Polish election.Cheer up. Roseanne won an Emmy.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 11, 1994
Nobody on the Street understands derivatives. Charles County treasurers understand them even less.The Confederate flag is going up all over, they torched a school in Alabama, the slums are worse than ever and you ask if there is still a need for the NAACP?Taslima Nasrin, the sexual rebel of Bangladesh, has fled to Scandinavia, where the climate is warmer for sassy women.
NEWS
October 6, 2003
U.S. official praises Pakistan for raids on terror suspects KANDAHAR, Afghanistan -- A top U.S. envoy praised Pakistan yesterday for raids that its military has made against suspected terrorist training camps in mountainous regions that border Afghanistan. "In recent days there have been some rather significant activities that the Pakistani forces have taken against the Taliban and al-Qaida," U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage told reporters in the southern Afghan city of Kandahar.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,Los Angeles Times | August 25, 2007
BAGHDAD -- U.S. forces firing from helicopters pursued armed militants loyal to a radical anti-American Shiite cleric into a western Baghdad slum yesterday, killing at least 18 people, reportedly including some civilians. U.S.-led forces said the predawn raid yesterday on the capital's Shula district was in response to an insurgent attack on a U.S. patrol in the area. But residents said the U.S. helicopter attack caught many in the Shiite community controlled by Muqtada al-Sadr's Mahdi Army asleep on their roofs, where they go to escape the stifling heat of apartments.
NEWS
By Ned Parker and Ned Parker,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 9, 2007
BAGHDAD -- U.S. aircraft opened fire on an east Baghdad neighborhood yesterday and killed 32 members of an al-Mahdi militia offshoot, the military said, in its latest strike against radical Shiite factions. An Iraqi police official speaking on the condition of anonymity said nine people were killed, at least two of them women. The toll was later updated to 10. Some residents in Sadr City, a Shiite slum largely controlled by radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's al-Mahdi Army, described watching as civilians were struck down, but a U.S. military spokesman insisted later they had killed only fighters.
NEWS
By Raheem Salman and Ned Parker and Raheem Salman and Ned Parker,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A U.S. search for fighters allegedly linked to Iran turned into a firefight early yesterday in which the military said it killed 26 militants. The Iraqi government rebuked the Americans for carrying out the raid in a Baghdad slum without its permission, and local leaders said many civilians had been hurt. Meanwhile, two U.S. soldiers have been charged with premeditated murder in connection with the deaths of three Iraqis, and with planting weapons on the bodies in order to cover up the crimes, the Army announced yesterday.
NEWS
By Alexandra Zavis and Alexandra Zavis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 31, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Hundreds of U.S. and Iraqi troops raided Baghdad's Sadr City slum yesterday, a day after five British citizens were kidnapped from a nearby government building in an assault that the foreign minister said bore the hallmarks of a militia strike. Two Iraqis working for the U.S. Embassy also were kidnapped yesterday, and at least 48 Iraqis were killed in other violence across Iraq. Among them were two journalists. The U.S. military announced the deaths of two soldiers in a roadside bombing yesterday, and a noncombat death of a soldier the previous day. The joint forces sealed off parts of the vast Shiite slum that is a bastion of anti-American cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's Mahdi Army militia during the early morning and went into homes to demand information about the missing Britons, residents said.
NEWS
By Sebastian Rotella and Sebastian Rotella,Los Angeles Times | April 22, 2007
ARGENTEUIL, France -- It is odd that Nicolas Sarkozy, the front-runner in France's presidential race, finds himself on the defensive in the immigrant slums that could play a key role in today's first-round election. As France's top law enforcement official, the hard-charging Sarkozy spent a lot of time in the nation's tense housing complexes. As a streetwise descendant of Hungarian and Greek-Jewish immigrants, he has a better instinctive understanding of those areas than most politicians, even some of his critics say. But just before the riots that shook France in October 2005, Sarkozy paid a nocturnal visit to a grim housing complex in this industrial city on the northwest periphery Paris.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
As reported in the March 12, 1964, edition of The Sun: A vow to rid Ellicott City of slum conditions within the next five years was made yesterday by Charles E. Miller, head of the Board of Commissioners. "What's more, we'll do it without a cent of federal aid," said the Republican chairman, "and do a better job, too." Should Mr. Miller accomplish such a feat - and there are those who would consider it a minor miracle - it will be in opposition to the plans suggested by other county officials.
NEWS
By ANTERO PIETILA | January 1, 1994
Life is more complex than newspaper headlines would suggest. Which is why I keep a blow-up of a September 23, 1956, Baltimore American story on my office wall.''$900 Million Plan Proposed To End City Slums By 1976,'' the headline trumpets. ''Would Raze 65,000 Homes.''Eighteen years after that presumed dawn of Brave New Baltimore, slums are getting worse. And not just slums. Abandonment is pockmarking even Baltimore neighborhoods that had been islands of stability. By the city housing department's accounting, Baltimore now has 410 blocks where more than 50 percent of the houses are vacant.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | August 24, 1995
"HIGH-RISES were conceptually the wrong idea," said Housing Commissioner Dan Henson on the eve of the destruction of Lafayette Courts.Just another case of 20-20 hindsight? Hardly. When Baltimore started building the darn things in the mid-1950s, the consensus among thoughtful students of urban life was that residential towers for the poor were dumb.So why were they built? Architects and social liberals wanted them. Here's what William H. Whyte Jr. wrote in the foreword to "The Exploding Metropolis," a collection of articles by the editors of Fortune magazine, published in 1957:Why did architects like towers?
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | March 31, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- Huge demonstrations have taken place this week in France and in America that highlight the very different ways the two countries cope with globalization. Whether you are Francophile or -phobe, the French demonstrations should make you nervous. And the American protests add a bit of brightness to a gloomy month. First to France. Hundreds of thousands of students and workers have taken to the streets and shut down schools, trains, air service and even the Eiffel Tower. Bands of masked youths, apparently from suburban slums, have burst into downtown Paris, smashing windows and setting cars on fire.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SHELDEN and MICHAEL SHELDEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 2006
House of Many Gods Kiana Davenport Ballantine / 328 pages / $24.95 The daughter of a native Hawaiian mother and a sailor father from Alabama, Kiana Davenport understands from personal experience what happens when cultures clash. The Hawaii that she describes in her fiction - this is her third novel set among the islands - is no tourist paradise but a feverish outpost of multicultural confusion. Young Ana, the heroine of House of Many Gods, grows up in a tough coastal area 30 miles west of Honolulu, where her high school is as bad as any in the congested ghettos of the mainland.
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