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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | March 31, 2009
Starring Dev Patel, Freida Pinto. Directed by Danny Boyle. Released by 20th Century Fox. $29.95, Blu-ray $39.95. **** (4 STARS) Slumdog Millionaire is the rare film that deserves all the accolades it has been receiving. With verve and panache, it transports American audiences to a world they've never experienced; makes it seem believable and wonderfully alive; presents us with characters we can identify with and, more important, root for; and leaves audiences craving more. Salman Rushdie's curmudgeonly dismissal notwithstanding, Slumdog is not crammed with "impossibilities" - at least no more so than any other Hollywood drama (Has Rushdie seen The Reader?
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | August 25, 2009
MTV announced Monday that it had won a bidding war to produce a U.S. version of "Skins," the popular, controversial television show about the lives of a group of British teens. But, instead of speaking in an English accent, you can expect the teens in the American version to speak fluent Bawlamerese. "I've been pursuing this project for two years, and we're planning to set our show in Baltimore," says Liz Gateley, senior vice president of series development for MTV. And, as is true of the original series, now in its third season, Gateley says, "we want to join together unknown teenagers to write the story lines and star in the pilot, though we'll also combine those performers with more seasoned faces."
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NEWS
January 23, 2009
For a complete list of Oscar nominations, go to baltimoresun.com/oscars Best Picture: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Frost/Nixon, Milk, The Reader, Slumdog Millionaire Best Actor: Richard Jenkins, The Visitor; Frank Langella, Frost/Nixon; Sean Penn, Milk; Brad Pitt, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button; Mickey Rourke, The Wrestler Best Actress: Anne Hathaway, Rachel Getting Married; Angelina Jolie, Changeling; Melissa Leo, Frozen River; Meryl Streep,...
NEWS
By From Sun news services | April 23, 2009
Jolie said to next play Cornwell's heroine Angelina Jolie has reportedly signed on to play Dr. Kay Scarpetta, the crime-solving medical examiner in mystery novelist Patricia Cornwell's best-selling series, according to Variety. The trade publication notes that although there are 16 Scarpetta novels, this film won't focus on a specific Cornwell title. In the novels, Scarpetta, the tough-as-nails forensic examiner, has a messy love life and a penchant for opera and Italian cooking. Before relocating to Massachusetts, she was the chief medical examiner of Virginia.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | February 23, 2009
HOLLYWOOD, Calif. - Slumdog Millionaire, a joyous story of enduring love and unexpected riches among the lower castes of India, took home the Oscar for best picture at last night's 81st annual Academy Awards, capping an unlikely awards season for a movie that barely got released in this country. The movie, which was picked up at the last minute by Fox Searchlight Pictures, dominated the awards, winning eight of the nine categories in which it was nominated (its only loss came in the sound editing category)
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | March 6, 2009
Recession meets escapism equals huge box office" became the Hollywood equation of the season when box-office analyst Paul Dergarabedian coined it to account for "the biggest start to any box-office year I've ever seen."
NEWS
By From Sun news services | April 23, 2009
Jolie said to next play Cornwell's heroine Angelina Jolie has reportedly signed on to play Dr. Kay Scarpetta, the crime-solving medical examiner in mystery novelist Patricia Cornwell's best-selling series, according to Variety. The trade publication notes that although there are 16 Scarpetta novels, this film won't focus on a specific Cornwell title. In the novels, Scarpetta, the tough-as-nails forensic examiner, has a messy love life and a penchant for opera and Italian cooking. Before relocating to Massachusetts, she was the chief medical examiner of Virginia.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | November 14, 2008
last call Happy-Go-Lucky : **** ( 4 STARS) If you've never seen a Mike Leigh movie, the best place to start is this portrait of an optimistic London schoolteacher (Sally Hawkins, left) who demonstrates the power of an attitude that embraces the world. It will introduce you to the way he builds characters and the way people in life build friendships, intuitively and in action. If you're already a Leigh fan, go and savor a film that reflects the sunniest facets of his genius (without ignoring the dark sides)
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | January 23, 2009
Some terrific recent Oscar-nominated movies, such as Good Night, and Good Luck and Capote, came as close to nonfiction in their techniques and textures as movie drama could bear. This year reverses the trend with vivid splashes of artifice and theatricality. Movies like The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Slumdog Millionaire, and even Milk and Frost/Nixon, though rooted in reality, have won over still-widening audiences with touches of myth and fable and sometimes just plain make-believe.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | February 23, 2009
The Oscars went Tony with a vengeance this year: It was like a concept musical with a flaccid concept, saved only by a few game performers and emotion-packed awards badly in need of a Parisian riot or an exploding chandelier. The idea was that the evening would tell the story of the making of a movie from the blank page to post-production. Some of the effects that idea yielded were elegant, especially when Tina Fey and Steve Martin read pages of the nominated screenplays as the words appeared over scenes from the film.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | March 31, 2009
Starring Dev Patel, Freida Pinto. Directed by Danny Boyle. Released by 20th Century Fox. $29.95, Blu-ray $39.95. **** (4 STARS) Slumdog Millionaire is the rare film that deserves all the accolades it has been receiving. With verve and panache, it transports American audiences to a world they've never experienced; makes it seem believable and wonderfully alive; presents us with characters we can identify with and, more important, root for; and leaves audiences craving more. Salman Rushdie's curmudgeonly dismissal notwithstanding, Slumdog is not crammed with "impossibilities" - at least no more so than any other Hollywood drama (Has Rushdie seen The Reader?
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | March 6, 2009
Recession meets escapism equals huge box office" became the Hollywood equation of the season when box-office analyst Paul Dergarabedian coined it to account for "the biggest start to any box-office year I've ever seen."
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | February 23, 2009
The Oscars went Tony with a vengeance this year: It was like a concept musical with a flaccid concept, saved only by a few game performers and emotion-packed awards badly in need of a Parisian riot or an exploding chandelier. The idea was that the evening would tell the story of the making of a movie from the blank page to post-production. Some of the effects that idea yielded were elegant, especially when Tina Fey and Steve Martin read pages of the nominated screenplays as the words appeared over scenes from the film.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | February 23, 2009
HOLLYWOOD, Calif. - Slumdog Millionaire, a joyous story of enduring love and unexpected riches among the lower castes of India, took home the Oscar for best picture at last night's 81st annual Academy Awards, capping an unlikely awards season for a movie that barely got released in this country. The movie, which was picked up at the last minute by Fox Searchlight Pictures, dominated the awards, winning eight of the nine categories in which it was nominated (its only loss came in the sound editing category)
NEWS
January 23, 2009
For a complete list of Oscar nominations, go to baltimoresun.com/oscars Best Picture: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Frost/Nixon, Milk, The Reader, Slumdog Millionaire Best Actor: Richard Jenkins, The Visitor; Frank Langella, Frost/Nixon; Sean Penn, Milk; Brad Pitt, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button; Mickey Rourke, The Wrestler Best Actress: Anne Hathaway, Rachel Getting Married; Angelina Jolie, Changeling; Melissa Leo, Frozen River; Meryl Streep,...
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | January 23, 2009
Some terrific recent Oscar-nominated movies, such as Good Night, and Good Luck and Capote, came as close to nonfiction in their techniques and textures as movie drama could bear. This year reverses the trend with vivid splashes of artifice and theatricality. Movies like The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Slumdog Millionaire, and even Milk and Frost/Nixon, though rooted in reality, have won over still-widening audiences with touches of myth and fable and sometimes just plain make-believe.
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