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NEWS
October 31, 1990
If you're a county resident ready to store sludge on your farm, you might as well forget it.As expected yesterday, county commissioners adopted a change in the county's zoning ordinance that makes the storage of sludge in Carroll illegal everywhere except near publicly owned sewage treatment plants.The change -- which takes effect today -- specifically prohibits the storage of sludge at private farms, such as the Robert C. Neall farm off Bear Run Road in Taneytown. That farm has been at the center of the county's sludge debate for years, as neighbors have been fighting a 13,500-ton sludge pit once used by Enviro-Gro Technologies.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Synagro Technologies, a Baltimore-based waste management company, faces grass-roots opposition to its application to spread industrial waste as fertilizer over farms in seven Virginia counties. As a result of the backlash - coming in the form of letters, phone calls and emails - the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality has delayed signing off on Synagro's plans. Industrial sludge is what remains after a business breaks down leftovers from processing products ranging from poultry to paper.
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NEWS
October 3, 1990
The owner of a farm with the county's only sludge storage pit said an ordinance proposed to limit sludge storage is aimed at him."I'm worn out with this whole damn business," said Robert C. Neal, whose farm is off Bear Run Road in Taneytown."
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | June 13, 2014
If you're in the mood for some science fiction silliness, "The Intergalactic Nemesis: A Live-Action Graphic Novel" promises to keep you laughing on Friday, June 20, at 8 p.m. in the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake. This Columbia Festival of the Arts presentation combines aspects of 1930s-style radio dramas with comic book art. Like such movies as "Star Wars" and "Raiders of the Lost Ark," this theatrical show looks to the campy science fantasy and adventure stories of that earlier era for its inspiration.
BUSINESS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
Baltimore has approved a $7.3 million contract to Bio Gro Systems Inc. of Annapolis to remove an estimated 170,000 tons of sludge from the Back River Waste Water Treatment Plant in the next two years.The contract, approved yesterday by the Board of Estimates, involves a new process that would dispose of sludge through a more efficient, economical and odor-free method, said George G. Balog, the city public works director.Balog said the city is negotiating with potential contractors to build two facilities at the city's Back River plant in eastern Baltimore County.
NEWS
March 20, 1991
Delegate Donald B. Elliott, R-Carroll, Howard, withdrew his bill that was intended to tighten state regulations for siting sludge storagefacilities."It was obvious it was not a good bill," said Elliott. "I think it is a good concept, but it wasn't right to take a vote. There were too many unanswered questions."Two major Baltimore-based waste management firms and the Washington Suburban Sanitation Commission opposed the bill. They charged thatit would encourage counties to reject sludge storage plans, leaving sewage treatment plants with limited outlets to dispose of the solid byproduct.
NEWS
September 25, 1991
Enviro-Gro Technologies Inc. has appealed a Maryland Court of Special Appeals decision in another effort to get permission to maintain a sludge pit in Taneytown.The company appealed to the Court of Appeals, the state's highest court, last week after the Maryland Court ofSpecial Appeals ruled in favor of a Carroll citizens coalition Sept.5.The Court of Special Appeals upheld a county zoning decision thatdenied Enviro-Gro the use of a sludge storage facility on the RobertC. Neal farm off Bear Run Road.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Synagro Technologies, a Baltimore-based waste management company, faces grass-roots opposition to its application to spread industrial waste as fertilizer over farms in seven Virginia counties. As a result of the backlash - coming in the form of letters, phone calls and emails - the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality has delayed signing off on Synagro's plans. Industrial sludge is what remains after a business breaks down leftovers from processing products ranging from poultry to paper.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 9, 2012
New farm regulations being aired this week by Maryland officials would ease first-ever limits on how, when and where the state's farmers can spread animal manure and sewage sludge on their fields. The " nutrient management" rules , which were posted online Wednesday, have been revised by state officials in response to widespread complaints when they were first floated last summer. A scientist who reviewed them calls them a major step forward in the long-running effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay. But farming and local government groups remain concerned about the potential costs, while environmentalists are split on whether they go far enough to curb farm pollution.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | March 10, 1996
Today, as part of our series "The Human Brain, So To Speak," we explore the phenomenon of: Brain Sludge.Brain sludge is a term coined by leading scientists to describe the vast collection of moronic things that your brain chooses to remember instead of useful information.For example: Take any group of 100 average Americans, and sing to them, "Come and listen to my story 'bout a man named Jed." At least 97 of them will immediately sing: "A poor mountaineer, barely kept his family fed." They will sing this even if they are attending a funeral.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
State environmental officials and the owners of the Sparrows Point peninsula are moving toward a settlement to correct alleged regulatory violations at the former steelmaking site. Regulators say an array of problems have occurred over the past year on the 2,300-acre peninsula, including illegal open dumping of industrial sludge, improper handling of hazardous materials and the running of an unlicensed scrap tire operation. "We are drafting a settlement in the form of a consent order which will provide terms and a schedule for corrective actions - and which will include a financial penalty," Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman Jay Apperson said in a statement.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 9, 2012
New farm regulations being aired this week by Maryland officials would ease first-ever limits on how, when and where the state's farmers can spread animal manure and sewage sludge on their fields. The " nutrient management" rules , which were posted online Wednesday, have been revised by state officials in response to widespread complaints when they were first floated last summer. A scientist who reviewed them calls them a major step forward in the long-running effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay. But farming and local government groups remain concerned about the potential costs, while environmentalists are split on whether they go far enough to curb farm pollution.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2011
State officials looking to clean up the Chesapeake Bay are weighing a series of new restrictions on how and when farmers can fertilize their fields — and on when municipal sewage treatment plants can spread their sludge on farmland. Draft regulations drawn up by the Maryland Department of Agriculture are drawing fire from farmers and local officials, who say the limits being proposed are onerous, costly and unwarranted. But one scientist said they are backed by research and needed to reduce the pollution fouling the bay. The rules, which have yet to be formally proposed, would, among other things, curtail the practice of fertilizing grain crops that are planted in the fall.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
Farmland across the Chesapeake Bay region is overloaded with phosphorus, a new study by an environmental group finds, indicating that the bay's waters are being polluted by excessive use of animal manure and sewage sludge as crop fertilizers. In a report released Tuesday, the Environmental Working Group says soil data on file at universities show that in one of five counties in the six-state watershed, more than half of all soil samples tested are overloaded with phosphorus, a nutrient blamed for fouling the bay's waters.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | March 27, 2010
State officials announced Friday that they had fined an Eastern Shore farm couple $4,000 for improperly piling sewage sludge near a drainage ditch. But the Department of the Environment declared it had closed its investigation of the Hudson farm in Berlin with no further action because its inspectors could not say the farm was responsible for pollution found in the ditches draining its land. State inspectors had detected high levels of bacteria and nutrients in the ditches, which ultimately drain into the Pocomoke River.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | December 23, 2009
A state inspection has determined that the mound on a Berlin chicken farm that environmental groups said was polluting a nearby waterway is treated sewage sludge rather than poultry manure. Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman Jay Apperson e-mailed Tuesday that an inspector found the pile on the Hudson farm was "Class A biosolid," a form of sewage sludge that has been treated to kill harmful bacteria and is only lightly regulated by the state. Jim Parsons, deputy chief of public utilities for Ocean City, said Tuesday that his agency had delivered a load of "biosolids" from Ocean City's wastewater treatment plant to Alan Hudson's farm in August.
NEWS
March 15, 1992
Melanie and Rodney A. Stambaugh have decided not to spread sludge on36 acres of their farm land after neighbors objected.Melanie Stambaugh said there were "lots of reasons" they changed their minds after a public meeting March 4 attended by about 100 people. The land isoff Middleburg Road near Francis Scott Key High School."I didn't need the hassle, for one thing," she said, adding that she wished neighbors had come to her before airing their objections publicly.Her father, Mehrl C. Adkins, also had applied to spread sludge on 103 acres of his farm at Trevanion and Clear View roads outside Taneytown.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | May 24, 1992
A citizens group has filed a federal lawsuit to block a company from disposing sludge at its Whiteford property, contending that contaminants in the material risk polluting drinking wells.The group, called the Mason-Dixon Safe Water Awareness Team, is asking for $5.3 million in damages from Whiteford Construction Co. in its suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on May 13.The 16-page, 617-count suit calls for the company to develop a plan to correct contamination at the site. The citizens also want federal and state agencies to increase their monitoring of the site.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | August 10, 2009
If you believe that the 1969 Apollo moon landing was staged in Hollywood; that Marilyn Monroe was killed by the Kennedy family and Lady Diana by the royal family ... If you believe that FDR allowed the Japanese to attack Pearl Harbor to facilitate America's entry into World War II and the Bush administration brought down the Twin Towers with explosive charges and holograms in order to provoke a war for oil ... If you believe that President Obama was...
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