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By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer/United Feature Syndicate | October 27, 1992
If you want to start a running program and don't know how, here's a plan:First, check with your doctor to rule out any underlying health problems that might curtail your exercise agenda. Then start by jogging slowly until your legs feel heavy or begin to hurt, or you start to tire. Stop for one day, even if you've only jogged a few paces. Do this every day and you should be able to work up to the point where you can jog slowly for at least 20 minutes without stopping.If you're happy with this program, you don't have to go any further to become fit. Exercising strenuously for 20 minutes, three times a week, is all you need for cardiovascular fitness.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
Significantly fewer people have been going to Maryland hospitals this year without health insurance, according to new data provided to The Baltimore Sun by state officials, who now say the rates that hospitals charge will rise more slowly for everyone. Hospitals are supporting a recommendation by the Health Services Cost Review Commission, which sets their rates, to reduce a proposed annual across-the-board rate increase that will take effect in July by about a quarter. "It's great that significantly fewer people are coming in without insurance than before," said Maryland Health Secretary Joshua Sharfstein.
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SPORTS
October 30, 1996
Opponent: Philadelphia PhantomsSite: Spectrum, PhiladelphiaTime: 7:05Radio: WWLG (1360 AM), WASA (1330 AM)Outlook: A veteran team, the Phantoms have started slowly (4-5-2). The Bandits (4-4-2) can move into second place in the division with a win after being in the cellar a week ago.Pub Date: 10/30/96@
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | December 23, 2013
No. 2 Mount St. Joseph got off to a sluggish start, which suited visiting Loyola just fine. But the Gaels found their offensive rhythm in the second half of Sunday's basketball game and won, 64-37. The Dons (3-6, 1-4 Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference) used a 2-3 zone to frustrate the Mount St. Joseph shooters. Neither team shot above 30 percent in the first half. Ryan Conrad gave Loyola a 4-3 lead with a pair of free throws with 4:55 left in the first quarter.
HEALTH
By Dr.Gabe Mirkin and Dr.Gabe Mirkin,Dr. Mirkin is a practicing physician in Silver Spring specializing in sports medicine and nutrition.New York Times Syndicate | September 25, 1990
The best way to prepare for an important competition, particularly running, is to taper your training for several days before the event. What's the best way to taper?Researchers at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, studied competitive athletes who were running 50 miles a week. One week before competition, the runners were given three different training programs.One group did no running at all. Another group ran fewer than 20 miles, very slowly. The last group sprinted 500 meters, five times on the first day of tapering, then four times on the second day, three times on the third day, two times on the fourth day and one time on the fifth day. On day six, they rested.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | December 3, 1991
The Baltimore Orioles appear intent on signing a free-agent pitcher to fill out their starting rotation, but the market does not seem to share their enthusiasm."
NEWS
By Chet Dembeck | November 21, 1990
I LEARNED the meaning of Thanksgiving one cold, rainy night while spinning wheels in the mud.The smell of burning rubber made me cough as I banged my fists against my --board in anger. I had just missed my exit, and in a moment of stupidity, I had decided to try and turn around by cutting across the grassy median.It had been raining all night, and as soon as I go halfway across the strip, the rear wheels of my '72 Gremlin sank deep into the soft ground.It was 3 a.m., and I had been driving back from New Jersey after having finished a gig in a new nightclub there.
NEWS
By Lisa Roberts and Lisa Roberts,Orlando (Fla.) Sentinel | January 5, 2007
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Exercise has slowly - very slowly - changed Jan Love's life. After breaking her neck and arm in an automobile accident, the 80-year-old Orlando woman was determined to recover. Though she underwent physical therapy, the exercises she learned failed to help restore much neck mobility. Frustrated, Love decided to try SuperSlow training, which she had seen advertised in a local newspaper. Less than a year later, she can move her head and neck freely. "I have a few kinks here and there," she says, "but this keeps me going."
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1998
The sheriff of Frederick County said yesterday he welcomes an FBI investigation into allegations his officers violated the civil rights of a diabetic man they mistook for a drunken driver and of a school teacher who was arrested and shackled for driving too slowly.In Baltimore, FBI Special Agent Larry Foust called the agency's involvement a "preliminary inquiry" prompted by news accounts of the incidents.Foust said that after an initial investigation, agents will consult with the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Attorney's Office to decide whether to proceed with a full-fledged investigation.
FEATURES
By SUSAN DIEZ and SUSAN DIEZ,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 28, 1993
Q: I recently got engaged to a wonderful woman. She is virgin and I am not. She is afraid of losing her virginity, even to me. I am sure she loves me enough, but I believe that her family never spoke much to her about sex. The question is: What can I do to allay her fears and allow her to experience sex?A: Since losing virginity is a rite of passage too significant for you alone to handle, gather some expert help. Talk to a couples counselor together. Get a copy of the book "The Joy of Sex" by Dr. Alex Comfort and read it -- slowly -- together.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
When the Ravens back in April traded up in the second round to draft Arthur Brown, assistant general manager Eric DeCosta remarked that Brown would be a “four-down linebacker” for the Ravens. For now, though, the rookie has been a one-down linebacker, playing on the defense mostly in passing situations. While a pair of rookies -- first-round safety Matt Elam and undrafted wide receiver Marlon Brown -- have stepped into starting roles, Brown is taking baby steps for the Ravens, who have handed the 23-year-old a small but significant role while giving snaps to two other players, Jameel McClain and Josh Bynes, at the weak-side linebacker position.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 3, 2013
More Marylanders were able to shop for insurance on a new state exchange Thursday as technicians slowly made improvements to the system. Maryland Health Connection opened for business Tuesday, but crashed almost immediately and has had problems all week. A logjam formed when people tried to create an account. State health officials made some improvements to the system Wednesday night and said more than 1,000 people were able to create accounts immediately after. Still, some complained of other problems in the system, including receiving error messages when entering basic information, such as age and marital status.
NEWS
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | August 13, 2013
The so-called deficiencies found by Harford County planners in the paperwork relating to traffic at the Bel Air South site where Walmart plans to build a store totaling 186,000 square feet aren't likely to have any effect on the long-term prospects for stopping the project. Odds are the new Bel Air South store will be open and the old Walmart on Constant Friendship Boulevard in Abingdon will be closed in time for the 2015 Christmas shopping season, if not sooner, traffic concerns notwithstanding.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
Patrick McAvoy knew his job had some drawbacks. As a contract employee at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, he lacked benefits and long-term stability, but he stayed on as an events coordinator for three years, hoping to be hired full time and seeing little opportunity elsewhere. This year, the job market shifted, and by spring, he had two offers. "It was pretty stunning. You send out resumes so many times and don't hear anything back. Then you hear back from multiple places, and all of them are good opportunities for your future," said McAvoy, 28, who turned down an information technology job at the Johns Hopkins University to be an events planner for the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman | May 10, 2013
Some years, Maryland Jockey Club stakes coordinator Coley Blind has to turn horses away from the Preakness.  He and other members of the staff may look through the credentials of 20 horses, calculating their earnings -- the Preakness uses a fairly complicated three-tiered system -- to determine the 14-horse field. Not this year. As of Friday afternoon, connections for only seven horses had confirmed they planned to enter the race, and five others had been identified as strong possibilities.
NEWS
February 16, 2013
Fifty years ago this month there was a knock on our apartment door. With a baby on my hip, I greeted my downstairs neighbor: "You've got to read this!" she said, pushing a book toward me. "It will change your life!" That was my introduction to The Feminine Mystique. It was a pleasant change from Dr. Spock. Although I was part of Betty Friedan's target audience - - a white, middle class, college-educated woman relegated to changing diapers and keeping house while her husband enjoyed a fulfilling career - The Feminine Mystique did not speak to me. It was a powerful, revolutionary book that should have made me mad as hell, but this then 25-year-old, happily married wife and mother felt blessed every day to be able to stay at home, care for her baby and keep house for an appreciative husband.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 29, 1994
The year's last week begs a backward look, an assessment of what happened around town during 1994. The urban skeptics will say that the last 12 months were tough, that Baltimore continued to lose jobs, population and confidence. The optimists see it the other way.This was the year that the bulldozers moved into Reservoir Hill and cleared the south side of drug-plagued Whitelock Street at Brookfield Avenue. The old shops, once the commercial heart of the neighborhood, are gone. But on a mild December afternoon, the drug dealers remained, brazenly selling their wares.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
IN PROTECTING OUR environment, no part of it is more complex than the land -- "the animal that contains all other animals," writer Barry Lopez once called it.And no part of the land presents a more complicated challenge than the fecund melange of swamps, bogs, glades, sloughs, potholes, pocosins, vernal ponds and marshes.These once covered 11 percent of the lower 48 -- and now are 5 percent, many degraded in quality. Maryland was once a quarter wetlands. Now it's about a fifteenth.Where they went is no mystery.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 29, 2012
Christmas season comes early for The Aegis Empty Stocking Fund, and the elves are busy working to get toys packed for the 831 Harford County children who will receive gifts of toys this holiday season. Time is running short, and the shelves in Santa's workshop are empty, especially for girls and boys, ages 11 to 13. Anything people can do to help fill their stockings will be appreciated, committee members said. The Empty Stocking Fund's all-volunteer committee offers special thanks to the Wagner Family for the wonderful gifts of toys and bikes that were delivered to Santa's workshop this week.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Carol Carr showed all the signs of colorectal cancer seven years ago, but doctors thought the 44-year-old Glen Burnie woman was too young to have the disease and never tested her for it. Instead, they said her diarrhea, vomiting, cramping, iron deficiency and extreme fatigue were more likely caused by the flu, anxiety and even a brain disorder. Treatments for those illnesses failed and Carr got so sick she had to stop working. When she finally saw a specialist who ordered a colonoscopy she was suffering from Stage II colorectal cancer.
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