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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
Utility work at Maryland Route 45 at Bosley Avenue has closed one of two northbound lanes and the shoulder. Expect delays.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Tammy Woodard lost pay and paid time off last year to federal budget tightening, which meant she had to tighten her family's budget — and continues to do so now in fear of future cuts. For the Aberdeen Proving Ground employee, it is a personal hit. But her situation is so common that it's a statewide issue, too. Maryland's personal income growth was among the lowest nationwide last year as federal budget cuts rippled through the region, affecting Virginia and the District of Columbia as well, the U.S. Department of Commerce estimated last week.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 16, 1992
It is too early to dance on banks' doorsteps, but recent earnings reports by several large banks suggest that the recession is loosening its grip on the Northeast.While many banks in the region have been able to recover more quickly than the economy by sharply reducing interest rates paid on deposits and squeezing out other costs, they are also reporting fewer troubled loans, or at least a sharp slowdown in the growth of them.Troubled loans -- those that are far behind in payments or are not expected to be repaid in full -- doubled and tripled at many banks as the economy turned downward in 1990 and 1991.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | June 6, 2013
Regular customers of Jos. A. Bank Clothiers are shopping in the chain's stores less often than usual. And this year, consumers have bought fewer items at lower prices than in the past, leading to a sharp drop in first quarter profits for the men's apparel seller. To reverse those trends, the Hampstead-based retailer plans to boost online sales, lure customers who wear big and tall sizes and continue expanding with new full-line and outlet stores, part of a five-step strategy outlined Thursday by Bank CEO R. Neal Black.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 26, 1995
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell from record highs yesterday as rising unemployment claims and dwindling home sales raised concern that companies will make less money as the economy slows down. Losses in paper shares were cushioned by rallies in drug stocks and electric utilities."It sounds like recession territory again," said Larry Bowman, president of SoundView Asset Management Inc.Novell Inc., the second-largest maker of personal computer software, fell after it reported weaker-than-expected sales of its flagship NetWare program in the latest quarter.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. economy is definitely slowing but no recession is in sight, Federal Reserve Board Vice Chairman Alan Blinder said yesterday."There are now downside risks that simply were not there several months ago," Mr. Blinder said in an interview.What's more, he said, the slowdown should prevent the economy from overheating, despite recent signs that inflation may be flaring up again. He professed little concern over yesterday's report that consumer prices rose 0.4 percent in April.
BUSINESS
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,Atlanta Journal-Constitution | June 28, 2007
At times, when I am working at my com- puter something begins to run in the background that slows everything down. Nothing appears on the screen to indicate what it might be. The slowdown will last for a brief period, then all is back to normal for a short time, then the slowdown will begin again. Do you have any suggestions as to what is causing this or what I can do? - Donald W. Titus, Boerne, Texas My first guess is that you have a spyware problem. These tiny programs report back to their owners - they're spying on you. Some computers can have 200 or more of these programs on the hard disk, a lot for a computer to handle.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1998
New-home sales in the Baltimore region hit a summer `D slowdown, according to July statistics released by Meyers Housing Data Reports, a newsletter that tracks new-home activity.Regional sales slipped 8.3 percent from June for single-family homes, townhouses and condominiums. But when comparing July with the same period last year, only a 0.9 percent decrease in sales was reported.Nevertheless, overall year-to-date sales through July have remained strong, showing a 26 percent increase over 1997.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 3, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Unemployment rose to a six-month high of 4.6 percent in September as the U.S. economy added fewer new jobs than expected and average weekly earnings fell, the government said yesterday in a report that suggests an economic slowdown may be intensifying.The increase from August's 4.5 percent jobless rate was accompanied by a gain of just 69,000 jobs last month as factories and builders slashed their payrolls and hiring by service companies slowed, Labor Department figures showed.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2001
While many companies cut employees as sales slowed in the first half of this year, Baltimore-based Under Armour Athletic Apparel added 15 people, increased revenue by nearly 400 percent and moved into a new office building. As they work from the newly renovated, 10,000- square-foot building in the shadows of PSINet football stadium, the executives of Under Armour are planning for more growth. The company, which manufactures moisture-wicking athletic wear, is creating a new women's line and looking to build its customer base, which includes the Baltimore Ravens and 27 other NFL teams.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
Utility work at Maryland Route 45 at Bosley Avenue has closed one of two northbound lanes and the shoulder. Expect delays.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
The second most-abundant element in the universe is in short supply. Lighter than air and nonrenewable, helium is however quite rare on Earth, derived mostly from natural gas deposits. And recently it's grown scarcer. In the Baltimore area, some florists and party-supply businesses are scrambling to find new suppliers for the helium that floats their balloons. Most are paying more for supplies, while some have raised prices or temporarily turned customers away. Other industries are feeling deflated too; besides blowing up balloons and blimps, helium is used to eliminate oxygen in welding in the aerospace industry, to cool magnets in MRI scanners and to help deep-sea divers breathe a nitrogen-free mix of air. The supply-and-demand imbalance has become more acute recently in the United States, some experts say. The shortage results from cutbacks in global production combined with increased demand from industries such as health care and semiconductor manufacturing, experts said.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Baltimore residential real estate broker Bonnie Fleck is no stranger to luxury. "I think it might be because my very first car was an Audi," Fleck said when asked why she chooses luxury cars instead of more utilitarian models. She also wants to give clients a comfortable ride as they drive from home to home, so she leases a new high-end car every few years. On Thursday, she picked up a black sedan at Lexus of Towson, which sold 208 vehicles last month — 60 more than May 2011, said Mike Meagher, the dealership's general manager.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | May 21, 2012
With about six minutes left in the fourth quarter of Saturday's NCAA tournament quarterfinal in Annapolis and Loyola nursing a 10-8 lead, coach Charley Toomey did what many others would have - and have - done in his position. He took the air out of the ball, played keep-away, and forced Denver to double-team, thereby leaving the net open for an easy goal. That strategy, however, almost backfired on the top-seeded Greyhounds. Denver forced a turnover and turned that miscue into a goal by freshman midfielder Wes Berg with 2:43 remaining.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | May 16, 2012
Denison enters this NCAA tournament quarterfinal with a 15-1 record and a six-game winning streak. But the Big Red's only loss of the season occurred April 7 at the hands of Stevenson, which is 17-4 and has won five of its last six contests. The Mustangs are 3-1 all-time against Denison and have won 12 of 13 games at home this season, most recently against Gettysburg in the second round last Saturday night. Here are a few factors that could influence the outcome at Mustang Stadium in Owings Mills Wednesday night.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
Mortgage servicers have started the countdown to foreclosure on more than 18,000 Maryland homes so far this month, a big uptick that is worrying state officials and could signal an end to about a year of delays related to robo-signing. The increase is in the number of notices sent to borrowers saying that their servicers intend to file a foreclosure case against them — a warning that must come at least 45 days ahead of any action. Fewer than 11,000 notices were filed in all of November 2010, according to state records.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2004
Navy had a five-point halftime lead against the Patriot League's best team yesterday, hung in against Lafayette for 10 more minutes and recovered nicely from a disheartening loss Friday to archrival Army. But, down the stretch, the taller, more talented Leopards asserted themselves to pull away for their seventh straight victory, 65-50, before 1,473 at Alumni Hall. Navy (3-17, 0-7) had no answers for Lafayette's size after playing a disciplined slowdown strategy for 30 minutes. "I haven't coached that kind of game since I was at Florida [1989-90]
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 3, 1998
CORTLANDT, N.Y. -- At 7:20 on a misty workday morning, like soldiers mustering at dawn reveille, commuters in this suburb 45 miles north of New York City assembled in long snaking lines leading to a Y-shaped intersection.The cars inched along the narrow, tree-lined roads, with 20 or so squirting ahead from each arm of the Y as the light went through its cycle, only to stack up at the next light, just 200 yards ahead."If you don't get here by 7, it takes a half-hour to go four miles," said Kathy Goldstein, an accountant who has stoically driven the route for six years.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | June 2, 2011
A few years ago, when our economy was still bubbling along, fueled by an apparently bottomless appetite of American consumers for debt, it was easy for us to assume economic growth to be a permanent thing. In the broadcasting business - to cite one example I've witnessed first-hand - every new fiscal year saw revenue quotas for the sales staffs accelerate. If income had increased by 15 percent the year previously, well then, it was expected to increase at least as much in the year to come.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2011
Johns Hopkins is building a 45,000-square-foot addition to its centerpiece Milton S. Eisenhower Library. Loyola University Maryland is putting the finishing touches on new teaching and research laboratories at the Donnelly Science Center. And at the University of Baltimore, a private developer is designing a student apartment building as a new law center takes shape. While new commercial construction in and around Baltimore remains moribund, big projects are sprouting on the region's university campuses.
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