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By ELIZABETH POND | June 14, 1992
The birth pangs of developing a multi-party system for majority rule threaten to be even more agonizing in Czechoslovakia than in Poland.Poles lack only a government, seven months after their first free vote. Czechs and Slovaks may lose their whole country.The good news is that Prague's parliament is not as splintered as its Warsaw counterpart. Czechoslovakia's second free election this June -- the first one two years ago was basically a referendum in which everyone voted to kick out the Communists -- gave a workable plurality of 34 percent to economic reformers in the Czech lands to the west.
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December 30, 2009
Blackhawks right wing Marian Hossa will lead Slovakia at February's Vancouver Olympics. Hossa is one of 12 NHL players on the 23-player roster announced Tuesday. Also headlining the team are Bruins defenseman Zdeno Chara and Rangers forward Marian Gaborik , who is tied for the NHL lead in goals, as well as former Sabres star Miroslav Satan. •Stars defenseman Stephane Robidas played Tuesday night against the Blackhawks wearing a cage to protect his face after undergoing surgery Monday to move a cheek bone that was pressing against the muscle and nerves in part of his head.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 20, 1991
BRATISLAVA, Czechoslovakia -- When Frantisek Hutka arrived here 55 years ago in the capital of Slovakia, all but five of the mailmen were Czechs.And that was just the beginning."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 1996
Mark McCoy, the new conductor of the Chesapeake Youth Symphony pressed into service after Scott Speck's resignation in November, was impressive at his debut at Maryland Hall.McCoy got my attention immediately in the brooding tempo that opens Beethoven's "Leonore" Overture. Rather than give his players an artificial boost through those lengthy phrases and searching harmonies, McCoy stuck to his (and Beethoven's) guns, demanding and getting sustained playing that covered over virtually every potentially empty space.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Special to The Sun | August 21, 1994
BRATISLAVA, Slovakia -- Two years ago, Eva Saskovicova thought independence was the best thing for her country: It would allow Slovaks to put their house in order, step out of the shadow of their Czech brothers and undertake economic reforms that would address Slovakia's unique problems.Now, she's not so sure."The split is no good. We're worse off than we were before," the 23-year-old bank employee said of developments in her country since the division of Czechoslovakia Jan. 1, 1993, three years after the Communists were ousted.
NEWS
By Peter S. Green and Peter S. Green,Contributing Writer | July 29, 1992
BRATISLAVA, Czechoslovakia -- In the wake of the Slovak nationalist victory in parliamentary elections last month, Slovaks are beginning to realize they will soon live in an independent state, and they are becoming worried.Last Thursday after weeks of negotiations with Czech Premier Vaclav Klaus, Slovak Premier Vladimir Meciar finally acknowledged what he had long been denying: that the Czechs will not accept his vision of a looser union with the Slovaks, and that the two parts of the country will separate.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | December 28, 1992
PRAGUE -- Three years and one month after the "Velve Revolution" that brought down communism in this former Soviet satellite, Czechs and Slovaks are poised to begin life anew as separate nations Friday.Surprisingly enough, the divorce thus far has been relatively "velvet" as well. Although harsh words have been exchanged and officials have sparred over the country's gold reserves, flags and fighter jets, there has been no threat of violent conflict between the two parties."There will be no war; the mentality of the people just isn't violent," said Jaroslav Veis, a columnist for the daily Lidove Noviny.
NEWS
By BEN BARBER | September 30, 1992
Washington. -- In the home of a Slovak journalist this summer, I was given a stiff dose of the brandy her family had distilled this year along with a frank description of the two worlds -- Slovaks and Czechs -- about to spin off into their own separate states.''We know they are smarter than us,'' she said. ''They have a culture for a long time. They grew up with books and ideas. If it wasn't for a neighbor who talked to me and encouraged me, I would never have gone to university. No one in my family did before me.''It's only since the communists came that thousands of Slovaks got higher education.
NEWS
By FRANZ SCHURMANN | June 28, 1992
More than an economic rich-poor gap, a cultural rich-poor gap is growing in the world and turning into a source of much of its social violence. This is particularly apparent in Europe, where open social warfare rages in its eastern parts and cultural rebellions are shaping up in its west.Culture is the ways a people live, work and think. But it also involves a people's sense of collective identity, who and what they are. When new cultures arise or old ones are threatened, they often can display awesome political force.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | December 31, 1992
PRAGUE -- Eva Eliasova lays down her pen and sighs, staring sadly at the questionnaire before her."It's terrible," said Ms. Eliasova, who was born in Slovakia but has lived in Prague for the last 27 of her 41 years. She points at a line asking what nationality she claims. "I have to write Czech.' But I feel like a Czechoslovak."As 15 million Czechs and Slovaks contemplate what their country's partition tonight will mean for them, hundreds of thousands of citizens living outside of their home republic are already faced with a tough choice: whether to take up citizenship in a new country, move back to the republic where they were born or continue living where they are but become foreigners.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 5, 1995
BRATISLAVA, Slovakia -- Being the son of the president has its benefits, particularly for a budding entrepreneur hoping to make a killing in the rough-and-tumble markets of Central Europe.Michal Kovac Jr., the son of Slovak President Michal Kovac, enjoys instant name recognition. He does not lack for business associates, especially those wanting to exploit his familial connections. But Mr. Kovac is learning, in an unexpectedly bruising way, that having a father in high office can also be perilous in Slovakia, where business is booming but democracy is going bust.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Special to The Sun | August 21, 1994
BRATISLAVA, Slovakia -- Two years ago, Eva Saskovicova thought independence was the best thing for her country: It would allow Slovaks to put their house in order, step out of the shadow of their Czech brothers and undertake economic reforms that would address Slovakia's unique problems.Now, she's not so sure."The split is no good. We're worse off than we were before," the 23-year-old bank employee said of developments in her country since the division of Czechoslovakia Jan. 1, 1993, three years after the Communists were ousted.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | January 27, 1993
PRAGUE -- Less than one month after the demise of the Czechoslovak federation he sought to preserve, Vaclav Havel was elected president yesterday of one-half of it, the new Czech Republic.Mr. Havel, the former Czechoslovak president and a leader of the 1989 "Velvet Revolution" that overthrew communism here, was chosen by 109 of the 200 deputies of the Czech Parliament.Debate was interrupted when a bomb scare forced officials to clear the parliament's chambers for nearly an hour. No bomb was found.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | January 1, 1993
BRATISLAVA, Slovakia -- The Czech Republic and Slovakia became the world's newest countries today, rising from the now-defunct Czechoslovak federation.At a ceremony on Bratislava's main square, officials raised the new Slovak flag at midnight to popping champagne corks, pealing church bells and the cheers of thousands of revelers."Slovakia is ours and will be ours forever," Slovak Premier Vladimir Meciar told the throng.The crowd broke out singing the Slovak national anthem, and thousands of firecrackers were set off."
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | December 31, 1992
PRAGUE -- Eva Eliasova lays down her pen and sighs, staring sadly at the questionnaire before her."It's terrible," said Ms. Eliasova, who was born in Slovakia but has lived in Prague for the last 27 of her 41 years. She points at a line asking what nationality she claims. "I have to write Czech.' But I feel like a Czechoslovak."As 15 million Czechs and Slovaks contemplate what their country's partition tonight will mean for them, hundreds of thousands of citizens living outside of their home republic are already faced with a tough choice: whether to take up citizenship in a new country, move back to the republic where they were born or continue living where they are but become foreigners.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | December 30, 1992
HODONIN, Czechoslovakia -- Hodonin's statue of Thomas Masaryk, Czechoslovakia's founding father and the town's native son, has had a tough half-century.Three times since it was erected in the 1930s, the memorial has been dismantled, hidden away and then put back up again as Masaryk has fallen out of and into favor with the country's rulers.And now it could all happen again."I don't know if somebody will come along and say, 'That's Masaryk, who founded the Czechoslovak state,' and tear it down again," said Stanislav Mikus, an adviser to the mayor of this town of 31,000.
NEWS
June 24, 1992
The civility of the breakup of Czechoslovakia, cordially agreed to by the elected Slovak leader, Vladimir Meciar, and his Czech counterpart, Vaclav Klaus, is a lesson to Yugoslavia and other federations unable to hold together. It is also a tragedy.The Czech Republic of Bohemia and Moravia, which does not want the split, can survive it well enough. Employment is high. The rapid transformation to a free market, charted by Mr. Klaus as economic minister, is working as well there as it has anywhere.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 30, 1992
Czechoslovakia's end comes as no surprise. There was an artificiality to its creation that foretold a short history, although the Slovaks who have broken up the union are the more likely to suffer from its loss.The departure of Vaclav Havel from public life -- if this is permanent -- is perhaps more to be regretted, not because he was a great statesman, or had the time to demonstrate that he was such, but because he brought a quality of detachment and reflection to politics rare at any time, and rarest most of all today in East, Central and Balkan Europe, and the ex-Soviet Union.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | December 28, 1992
PRAGUE -- Three years and one month after the "Velve Revolution" that brought down communism in this former Soviet satellite, Czechs and Slovaks are poised to begin life anew as separate nations Friday.Surprisingly enough, the divorce thus far has been relatively "velvet" as well. Although harsh words have been exchanged and officials have sparred over the country's gold reserves, flags and fighter jets, there has been no threat of violent conflict between the two parties."There will be no war; the mentality of the people just isn't violent," said Jaroslav Veis, a columnist for the daily Lidove Noviny.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | October 19, 1992
The smell of roast pork with sauerkraut and knedliky -- dumplings -- filled the cavernous hall in Parkville yesterday, as an "oom-pah" band pumped "Roll Out the Barrel."Women in bright, Czechoslovakian embroidery ate at circular banquet tables, while young gymnasts from the local sokol, or athletic club, tumbled on mats.Later, they planned to crowd around an accordion player for a traditional Bohemian sing-along.Czechoslovakia may be splitting apart, but the sixth annual Czechoslovak festival went forward in high spirit yesterday with about 500 people in attendance.
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