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By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
The morning of May 20, 1972, broke under dark, foreboding skies in Baltimore. A light mist fell, adding to a quagmire that had built up at Pimlico Race Course from a heavy, overnight rain.In the solitude of a Pimlico barn, jockey Eldon Nelson spoke with trainer Del Carroll and the handlers of Bee Bee Bee about the possibility of pulling out of the Preakness later that day.Nelson argued emphatically against scratching."We exercised him in the morning and the trainer wanted to know whether I thought we should run," Nelson said recently.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, Lorraine Mirabella and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2012
Diane Townes waited in line for 12 hours to get her door-buster deals — printers, a laptop and a 50-inch television — so imagine her chagrin when it looked like she wouldn't be able to squeeze it all into her car Friday morning. The Owings Mills nurse shivered in the cold at 5:30 a.m. outside the Towson Walmart, watching store workers try unsuccessfully to fit her $298 Emerson TV in the trunk and back seat. She finally folded down her back seats and shoved it through the trunk, capping a shopping spree that had started Thanksgiving afternoon.
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SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | January 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- You wouldn't think you could find the little boy in someone who's 6 feet 3 and 285 pounds, and then you mention mud.Mark Schlereth, who's big enough to need mud flaps, loves mud. course he does. He's an offensive lineman. This is someone who enjoys it when people call him a hog. He doesn't think he's had a good day unless his uniform looks like it had to be cleaned with a jet spray, which means he likes to roll in mud. To belly-flop in mud. To exult in mud.Just ask him about the, uh, inclement weather at RFK yesterday, and the Redskins guard smiles down on you like sunshine.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun reporter | May 3, 2008
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Chelokee, a 4-year-old colt trained by Michael Matz, misstepped on a sloppy track in the Grade III Alysheba Stakes yesterday, threw his jockey Ramon Dominguez and suffered a right front condylar fracture. "That's amazingly very similar to what Barbaro had, only in another leg," said Dr. Larry Bramlage, the on-call equine doctor at Churchill Downs. Dominguez was unhurt in the accident that occurred after a rainstorm and has been cleared to ride Monba in tomorrow's Kentucky Derby.
SPORTS
By Pete Bielski and Pete Bielski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 15, 1999
Jockey Brent Bartram didn't ask any questions when he was asked to ride Delta Music at Laurel Park yesterday.The Delaware Park regular has learned to do as told when New York trainer Neil Howard has instructions. The result was an easy commute down I-95 and an easier ride to victory in the $125,000 Straight Deal Breeders' Cup Handicap."When Neil calls, you just go," said Bartram, 36. "You know he's going to have the horses ready to go."Delta Music, with seven wins from 14 career starts, had been battling tougher competition before yesterday's debut in Maryland.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1998
A custodian at a Baltimore elementary school is accused of shooting at a co-worker during an argument about work while school was in session yesterday, police said.The bullet struck the floor of a "slop room" at Mount Royal Elementary School and did not injure anyone, police said. They said the "slop room" is in a second-floor alcove of the school and is not near classrooms.Police said the custodian charged in the shooting, Anthony J. Hopkins, 41, had been arrested 10 times and convicted twice since he was hired by the Baltimore school system in 1981.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
Hydration packs you strap to your back are OK for backpacking, long-distance running or biking across vast expanses. However, activities that are a tad less ambitious still require water breaks to keep all systems operating to factory specs. For those times, Camelbak, a leader in hydration packs, has created a better bottle that doesn't squirt or allow water to slop down the front of your shirt. The dishwasher-safe bottle holds .75 of a liter, has a flip-up, bite-and-sip spout and has a useful loop that not only allows you to clip the bottle, but also prevents it from rolling around.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | April 19, 1993
For about one inning yesterday, Mike Mussina became, by his own definition, a "slop pitcher," though he won't apologize for it.Mussina had worked so hard against California for seven innings, limiting the Angels to three runs and six hits, that by the time the eighth rolled around, he had little left."
SPORTS
By Bill Finley and Bill Finley,New York Daily News | October 18, 1991
ELMONT, N.Y. -- Angel Cordero won his 7,000th career race at Belmont yesterday. Again. As far as some records are concerned, Cordero, just 21 days shy of his 49th birthday, moved into the record books as Don't Cross The Law galloped through the slop to win yesterday's eighth race.In a situation that should have a sport greatly embarrassed, however, it turns out no one is quite sure how many winners Cordero has had. It was originally felt that records kept by the Daily Racing Form, from which the 7,000 figure was derived, were accurate.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1999
Testafly marked his return to the winner's circle yesterday with an explosive, overpowering, 12-length victory in the closing-day stakes at Pimlico, the Grade III $200,000 Baltimore Breeders' Cup Handicap.This was Testafly's first win since July. Since then, his reputation was besmirched and his Laurel-based trainer, Dale Mills, fined and suspended 45 days in a controversy involving the drug clenbuterol, which is legal for training but not for racing. Mills denied ever giving his horse the drug.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 29, 2008
Penelope stars Christina Ricci as Penelope Wilhern, a blue-blood born with a pig's snout because of a curse put on the Wilhern clan when it refused to let one of her 19th-century forebears marry a servant girl. She can break the curse only when a fellow aristocrat vows to love her for life, so her mother (Catherine O'Hara) hides her away in the family manse until she's of a marriageable age. Not even the most careful preparation can keep a succession of upper-class twits from jumping out a second-story window when they finally clap eyes on her. The movie is about what happens after one of those marital petitioners (Simon Woods)
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
Hydration packs you strap to your back are OK for backpacking, long-distance running or biking across vast expanses. However, activities that are a tad less ambitious still require water breaks to keep all systems operating to factory specs. For those times, Camelbak, a leader in hydration packs, has created a better bottle that doesn't squirt or allow water to slop down the front of your shirt. The dishwasher-safe bottle holds .75 of a liter, has a flip-up, bite-and-sip spout and has a useful loop that not only allows you to clip the bottle, but also prevents it from rolling around.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | April 13, 2003
AUGUSTA, Ga. - So Martha Burk could muster only about three dozen warm bodies for her long-promised protest at Augusta National. She'll be crucified on sports talk radio stations coast-to-coast for the apparent lack of support, but hold on: There was that inflatable pink pig. Martha's rosy dirigible flew low and proud over the grassy field where local sheriff Ronnie Strength and the local magistrate (Burk contended) went out of their way to stick her (and her kind) out of THE way - a half-mile down Washington Road from the exclusive gates of Hootie's golf club for men. "Welcome to the police state of Georgia!
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2000
Rare is it a game at Camden Yards is played in a mid-June fog. But last night's evaporating starting pitching, stumblebum fielding and lackluster relief validated the weatherman's forecast. The team with the first-inning grand slam and four-run eighth inning beat the team that sent 11 hitters to the plate during its seven-run fourth inning. The Orioles may have looked better in almost all their previous wins, but it's doubtful they've been more resilient than in last night's 11-10 beating of the Texas Rangers before an announced crowd of 39,231 at Camden Yards.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2000
The $50,000 Basil Hall Stakes was intended to be Just Call Me Carl's first test on the turf track yesterday at Pimlico Race Course. Instead, it turned into his maiden effort in the mud, and the Strawberry Road horse passed the examination almost effortlessly. The horse who runs for charity was anything but charitable to three rivals, racing them into submission and proceeding to a 2 1/2 -length victory over Rudirudy on a track rated "good." Just Call Me Carl increased his lifetime earnings to $191,671 with his third stakes triumph.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1999
The skies opened about 15 minutes before the $75,000 Carousel Stakes at Laurel Park yesterday. Torrents of rain fell.Jose Martin and his son Jose Martin Jr. looked toward the heavens and thanked their lucky stars."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | July 5, 1995
Stuart Janney was on his way back to Baltimore from Maine, picked up a Daily Racing Form, saw the field for yesterday's Fort McHenry Handicap and said he thought, "Aw, shucks."One of the finest fields of the summer was entered to run against his colt, Warning Glance, in Laurel Park's Fourth of July feature, including Kiri's Clown and Lassigny, graded stakes winners that are among the best turf runners in New York.What's more, Kiri's Clown, fresh from a four-length score in the New Hampshire Sweepstakes, is a quality front-runner, who was expected to press Warning Glance for the lead and possibly set up the race for Lassigny, the Bill Mott-trained Group stakes winner from France that is just a shade under being a top horse.
SPORTS
By Pete Bielski and Pete Bielski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 15, 1999
Jockey Brent Bartram didn't ask any questions when he was asked to ride Delta Music at Laurel Park yesterday.The Delaware Park regular has learned to do as told when New York trainer Neil Howard has instructions. The result was an easy commute down I-95 and an easier ride to victory in the $125,000 Straight Deal Breeders' Cup Handicap."When Neil calls, you just go," said Bartram, 36. "You know he's going to have the horses ready to go."Delta Music, with seven wins from 14 career starts, had been battling tougher competition before yesterday's debut in Maryland.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1999
Testafly marked his return to the winner's circle yesterday with an explosive, overpowering, 12-length victory in the closing-day stakes at Pimlico, the Grade III $200,000 Baltimore Breeders' Cup Handicap.This was Testafly's first win since July. Since then, his reputation was besmirched and his Laurel-based trainer, Dale Mills, fined and suspended 45 days in a controversy involving the drug clenbuterol, which is legal for training but not for racing. Mills denied ever giving his horse the drug.
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