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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | November 21, 1993
St. Mary's College in Southern Maryland went to a national sailing championship earlier this month and brought home its first national athletic title from the Intercollegiate Yacht Racing Association Sloop Nationals.The team from the college in St. Mary's City qualified for the competition by winning the Mid-Atlantic Intercollegiate Sailing Association championships last month.Sailing for St. Mary's were All-America Tim Healy of Niantic, Conn., Bob Oberg of Westmont. N.J., and Peter S. Thompson of Annapolis.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
Sloop Betty, the flagship spirit of new Maryland distillery Blackwater Distilling, has some fans outside of the state. The trade magazine The Tasting Panel gave it a 94-point rating in its July issue. In a small blurb in its review section, the magazine describes the vodka as "lush and rich with creamy texture and lovely grain notes; complex, elegant and dense with subtle vanilla space; long, deep and seamless. " Of all the spirits reviewed in the issue, the vodka got the highest rating besides Pappy Van Winkle's Family Reserve Bourbon.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | July 2, 1999
When the old warship Constellation returns to Baltimore's Inner Harbor today, its flags and pennants flying, it will be greeted by cannon, the roar of Navy jets and a huge sigh of relief. "There were a lot of people who thought this would never happen," said Gail Shawe, chairwoman of the Constellation Foundation, who led the ship's rescue. The 145-year-old sloop of war -- a veteran of the Civil War and anti-slavery patrols off West Africa -- has just completed a 30-month restoration that cost $7.3 million.
NEWS
Erik Maza and Midnight Sun | May 18, 2011
The Black-Eyed Susan has been the official cocktail of the Preakness Stakes since time immemorial. At least since the 1950s, estimates Pimlico Race Track historian Joe Kelly. The cocktail has been re-invented over the years, but not enough to satisfy people's complaints. Back in 1985, reporter Rob Kasper ran a contest to replace it with a new cocktail. It's time to give a coup another try. It's not like there isn't precedent. The White Carnation had been the official cocktail of the Belmont Stakes for years, until master mixologist Dale DeGroff suggested a change to his version of whiskey punch, which he called the Belmont Breeze.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2007
Alexander Kirkland Barton, a retired Baltimore insurance executive and volunteer, died of prostate cancer Monday at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. He was 84. Mr. Barton was born in Berkeley, Calif., and after the death of his father lived briefly in Sweden with his mother before they moved to Roland Park in 1929. He was a 1941 graduate of Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va., and earned his bachelor's degree in a wartime-accelerated program from Yale University in 1944.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,Staff writer | November 10, 1991
C. Milton Wright goalie Sarah Sloop had one game plan in mind going up against Bethesda-Chevy Chase in Monday's state field hockey semifinal. She wanted to be aggressive."
FEATURES
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1998
The biggest wooden sailing vessel Lou Linden needs to worry about these days is the Barry Duckworth, his long-idle 35-foot pleasure sloop. With any luck, Linden says, he will finish the little sloop's new icebox this summer, and get it back under sail in time for a cruise of the Chesapeake this fall.For the first time in 3 1/2 years, Linden has a little leisure time to spend on such simple concerns. Last month, he resigned as executive director of the Constellation Foundation, where he was chief fund-raiser, cheerleader and mother hen for the 176-foot Constellation - the last Civil War warship afloat and centerpiece for Baltimore's Inner Harbor renaissance.
NEWS
May 1, 2002
Florence "Flossie" Gibbons-Neff, a homemaker and hospital volunteer, died Sunday of complications from a stroke and pneumonia at her home, Clovelly Farm, in Chestertown. She was 87. She was a past president of the Kent and Queen Anne's Hospital Auxiliary. She also belonged to the American Red Cross and the Chestertown Garden Club. Born in Philadelphia, Florence Chance attended Vassar College and moved to the Eastern Shore in 1959. She sailed with family members on her sloop, Prim, on the Chester River and Chesapeake Bay, along the East Coast and in the Caribbean.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2002
As the old sloop of war Constellation floats placidly in Baltimore's Inner Harbor, a new book has begun to stir the waters of an old debate that once nearly sank the ship. Fells Point naval historian Geoffrey M. Footner has written a 345-page book that seeks to reassert the historic ship's legal and physical ties to the old frigate Constellation, which was built in Baltimore in 1797. Relying on government records and shipyard logs, Footner challenges the prevailing view - held by many naval historians and by Living Classrooms Foundation, the nonprofit organization that now maintains the vessel - that the frigate was scrapped in 1853 and replaced the next year by a sloop of war, built new from the keel up in Portsmouth, Va. Instead, he says, historical documents demonstrate that the ship's construction in Virginia was carried out as a routine "rebuild" of the old frigate, much like earlier rebuilds in 1812, 1829 and 1839.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | October 23, 1994
Under a genoa furled down to the size of a storm jib, the 31-foot sloop made its way along the edge of the shipping channel in the Chesapeake a few miles below the Bay Bridge, moving at a snail's pace.A dozen oyster boats were clustered at the end of the Tolly Point bar, patent tongs rising and falling, the clamor of machines and men carrying far across the water.High over the shipping channel, four dozen Canada geese noisily made their way toward their wintering grounds somewhere beyond the horizon on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2007
Alexander Kirkland Barton, a retired Baltimore insurance executive and volunteer, died of prostate cancer Monday at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. He was 84. Mr. Barton was born in Berkeley, Calif., and after the death of his father lived briefly in Sweden with his mother before they moved to Roland Park in 1929. He was a 1941 graduate of Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va., and earned his bachelor's degree in a wartime-accelerated program from Yale University in 1944.
NEWS
August 27, 2006
Constellation berths at Academy In 1879, The Sun reported that the USS Constellation arrived in Annapolis on Aug. 29 as a training ship for the U.S. Naval Academy. The 179-foot ship had been commissioned in 1855 to patrol the West African coast for slave trader ships. Now the Constellation was anchored in the Severn River and had a berth for Rear Adm. George B. Balch, the academy superintendent. He had sailed with the storied vessel for 10 days to examine its workings. Midshipmen learned the ropes on it until 1893.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2004
One of the Inner Harbor's best-known tenants, the sloop of war Constellation, will visit an old home this month when it returns to the U.S. Naval Academy for the first time in more than 110 years. The Constellation served as a training vessel at the academy from 1871 to 1893 but has not been there since. The ship will be towed by tugboat from Baltimore to Annapolis on Oct. 26 and be moored along the academy's Farragut Seawall for six days as part of the ship's 150th anniversary celebration.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2002
As the old sloop of war Constellation floats placidly in Baltimore's Inner Harbor, a new book has begun to stir the waters of an old debate that once nearly sank the ship. Fells Point naval historian Geoffrey M. Footner has written a 345-page book that seeks to reassert the historic ship's legal and physical ties to the old frigate Constellation, which was built in Baltimore in 1797. Relying on government records and shipyard logs, Footner challenges the prevailing view - held by many naval historians and by Living Classrooms Foundation, the nonprofit organization that now maintains the vessel - that the frigate was scrapped in 1853 and replaced the next year by a sloop of war, built new from the keel up in Portsmouth, Va. Instead, he says, historical documents demonstrate that the ship's construction in Virginia was carried out as a routine "rebuild" of the old frigate, much like earlier rebuilds in 1812, 1829 and 1839.
NEWS
May 1, 2002
Florence "Flossie" Gibbons-Neff, a homemaker and hospital volunteer, died Sunday of complications from a stroke and pneumonia at her home, Clovelly Farm, in Chestertown. She was 87. She was a past president of the Kent and Queen Anne's Hospital Auxiliary. She also belonged to the American Red Cross and the Chestertown Garden Club. Born in Philadelphia, Florence Chance attended Vassar College and moved to the Eastern Shore in 1959. She sailed with family members on her sloop, Prim, on the Chester River and Chesapeake Bay, along the East Coast and in the Caribbean.
SPORTS
By GILBERT LEWTHWAITE | November 2, 2000
Most serious sailors would question the sanity of going into blue water on any boat less than 40 feet long. So, choosing to race a sloop little more than half that length across an ocean might strike some old salts as madness. But little suggests anything but seriousness of purpose in Gale Browning, as she gears up for next year's Mini-Transat. It is a race for solo sailors on 21-foot sloops over 4,000 miles from France, via the Canary Islands, to Brazil. Browning, a certified marine surveyor in Annapolis and former delivery skipper, is inspired by legendary French single-handed ocean-racer Isabelle Autissier.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
Robert M. Halley, a sailmaker and foreman of the rigging department at the Naval Academy who helped to build the first Pride of Baltimore, died Saturday of an aneurysm at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. He was 44 and lived in White Hall. Mr. Halley had been foreman of the rigging department, located at the Small Craft Facility across the Severn River from the academy, since 1977. Under his supervision were 20 sloops, 25 "knockabouts," and American Promise, a 60-foot sloop used as a training vessel for midshipmen.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | August 14, 1991
The sleek 50-foot racing sloop slices through whitecaps on the Chesapeake as the steeples and domes dotting the Annapolis skyline disappear in a morning haze.Out here aboard the Gem, it's easy to forgetthe city William Ray knows so well -- not Camelot on the Bay, not America's sailing capital, but another Annapolis altogether.In the 10-year-old's neighborhood, the Newtowne 20 public housingcomplex, drug dealers, many with knives or guns, ply their trade on the streets.Today, William is glad to escape the neighborhood.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
Robert M. Halley, a sailmaker and foreman of the rigging department at the Naval Academy who helped to build the first Pride of Baltimore, died Saturday of an aneurysm at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. He was 44 and lived in White Hall. Mr. Halley had been foreman of the rigging department, located at the Small Craft Facility across the Severn River from the academy, since 1977. Under his supervision were 20 sloops, 25 "knockabouts," and American Promise, a 60-foot sloop used as a training vessel for midshipmen.
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