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By Dusko Doder | March 12, 2000
THERE IS a whiff of quagmire coming from the Balkans. The flashpoint is the divided Kosovo town of Mitrovica, just a few miles south of the border with Serbia proper. The prospect of NATO troops -- Americans in particular -- getting bogged down in a Belfast-type cycle of ethnic terrorism during an American presidential election year has raised alarm in Washington. The mining town of about 80,000 is divided by a river. The Serbs are north of the river, the Albanians south, with French peacekeepers in between.
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NEWS
By ALISSA J. RUBIN and ALISSA J. RUBIN,LOS ANGELES TIME | March 19, 2006
POZAREVAC, Serbia and Montenegro -- Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic was buried in his hometown yesterday on a day that had the air of a political rally, with fervent crowds chanting his nickname, "Slobo," as though he were still their leader. Although more than 60,000 defiant supporters had gathered in the capital, Belgrade, earlier in the day to commemorate the former president, the burial service here in a small central Serbian town was low-key and oddly devoid of emotion.
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NEWS
By JEFFREY FLEISHMAN and JEFFREY FLEISHMAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 12, 2006
Slobodan Milosevic, the former Yugoslav leader whose sinister nationalism propelled his country into four wars and unleashed a decade of "ethnic cleansing" that cost more than 250,000 lives, was found dead in his prison cell yesterday in The Hague, where he was on trial for crimes against humanity. Guards found Milosevic, 64, dead in his bed at the United Nations detention center, the U.N. war crimes tribunal announced. He apparently died of natural causes. An autopsy was ordered. Milosevic had a history of poor health, including high blood pressure and a chronic heart condition.
NEWS
By TOM HUNDLEY and TOM HUNDLEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 18, 2006
LONDON -- Preliminary toxicology tests released yesterday on former Yugoslav leader Slobodan Milosevic found no evidence of poison or the presence of other drugs in quantities sufficient to kill him. Milosevic had a fatal heart attack in his prison cell in The Hague a week ago, ending his four-year trial on charges of war crimes and genocide. His family says he was poisoned. Others suspect suicide. The findings, disclosed in a letter from The Hague district public prosecutor, are likely to deepen the controversy.
NEWS
By Richard Mertens and Richard Mertens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 2002
KRUSHE E VOGEL, Kosovo --- For three years, Shemsije Batusha, 32, clung to the hope that her husband would come back. She cleaned, cooked meals, chopped wood, looked after her son, Mevlan, and tended to her 77-year-old mother-in-law. She earned money when she could. But all the while she told herself that her hardships would end when her missing husband, Milain, returned and took his place in the family again. All over Krushe e Vogel, a small, hillside farming village in southern Kosovo, women tried to lighten their grief with the hope that their absent husbands and sons would return.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 7, 1995
Slobodan and Radovan have this good-Serb, bad-Serb routine down pat.The state guaranteed Dr. Gallo about what the Orioles gave Sid Fernandez.Just because there's a bust of Spiro in the U.S. Senate does not prove him guilty.
NEWS
December 20, 1997
A COURT in southern Serbia fined Snezana Velickovic $60 for calling Yugoslav Federation president and Serbian strong man Slobodan Milosevic a "thief and a swindler."Serbia's shattered economy consists mostly of smuggling by thug friends of the strong man. If Serbia could manage to fine every Serb who thinks what Ms. Velickovic was heard to say, it could balance the budget.Pub Date: 12/20/97@
NEWS
January 3, 2000
WHAT the world does not need in 2000 is a fourth genocidal war in the former Yugoslavia. Montenegro's pro-Western President Milo Djukanovic threatens a referendum on independence. Serbia's dictator Slobodan Milosevic has supporters in the one republic that remains in federation with Serbia, as well as Yugoslav federal troops there. Montenegro is a mountainous, lightly populated, crime-ridden land ill-suited to independence. President Djukanovic is on high ground with autonomy, but should stop there.
NEWS
December 21, 1993
Slobodan Milosevic's Socialists made incremental gains in the Serbian parliamentary elections to about half the seats. It was neither triumph nor setback. And the opposition did not really oppose the aggression that has been successful in establishing the outlines of Serbian national achievement -- all Serbs in one state -- to which most Serbs instinctively aspire.But it doesn't matter. Mr. Milosevic, an authoritarian president, never needed parliamentary majorities. The more significant election for Yugoslavia's future was Russia's, where Russian nationalism, as a caricature of the worst features of Serbian nationalism writ large, made such gains and showed such sympathy for Mr. Milosevic's policy that the likelihood of any Western nation getting in the way of Serb aggression greatly receded.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 17, 2006
BELGRADE, Serbia and Montenegro -- Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic remained a divisive figure in death yesterday as controversies erupted over the display of his body and his former political opponents hurried to organize a demonstration to counter the adulation expected at his funeral tomorrow. They launched a text-message campaign urging their supporters to go to the center of Belgrade and let fly balloons at the same time as the rites. The former president was found dead Saturday in the United Nations detention center at The Hague, where he was being tried on charges of genocide and war crimes before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By LAWRENCE DOUGLAS | March 17, 2006
Last summer in The Hague, I asked a number of prosecutors working on the war crimes trial of Slobodan Milosevic to imagine their nightmare scenario. None mentioned acquittal. They all turned to the fear that history would judge the trial a colossal failure if, after years of testimony and hundreds of millions of dollars spent, the former Yugoslav president died before a verdict could be reached and justice could be done. Now that the prosecutors' worst fears have come to pass, will history really be so severe?
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 17, 2006
BELGRADE, Serbia and Montenegro -- Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic remained a divisive figure in death yesterday as controversies erupted over the display of his body and his former political opponents hurried to organize a demonstration to counter the adulation expected at his funeral tomorrow. They launched a text-message campaign urging their supporters to go to the center of Belgrade and let fly balloons at the same time as the rites. The former president was found dead Saturday in the United Nations detention center at The Hague, where he was being tried on charges of genocide and war crimes before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By ALISSA J. RUBIN and ALISSA J. RUBIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 16, 2006
BELGRADE, Serbia and Montenegro -- The coffin slid down the luggage conveyor after a baby carriage, several large cartons and suitcases as a few friends gathered on the runway under a fine snow yesterday to welcome home the body of former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. The coffin was draped with the Serbian flag and put into a rented hearse for the trip to a state hospital morgue where the body would be held overnight. Milosevic will be buried Saturday in his hometown of Pozarevac.
NEWS
By SEBASTIAN ROTELLA AND ALISSA J. RUBIN and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA AND ALISSA J. RUBIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 15, 2006
THE HAGUE, Netherlands -- Officials of the U.N. war crimes tribunal said yesterday that former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic was allowed access in detention to some visitors with only minimal surveillance and searches. The limited scrutiny of those visits could have provided an opportunity for Milosevic to obtain the drug Rifampicin, which was found in his blood and might have contributed to his death. Because Milosevic chose to represent himself before the tribunal, he was given the right to meet with his legal advisers, diplomatic officials or prospective trial witnesses in a workspace which was only lightly monitored, said officials at the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By JEFFREY FLEISHMAN and JEFFREY FLEISHMAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 12, 2006
Slobodan Milosevic, the former Yugoslav leader whose sinister nationalism propelled his country into four wars and unleashed a decade of "ethnic cleansing" that cost more than 250,000 lives, was found dead in his prison cell yesterday in The Hague, where he was on trial for crimes against humanity. Guards found Milosevic, 64, dead in his bed at the United Nations detention center, the U.N. war crimes tribunal announced. He apparently died of natural causes. An autopsy was ordered. Milosevic had a history of poor health, including high blood pressure and a chronic heart condition.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally | December 19, 2003
Gen. Wesley K. Clark, the retired U.S. general and former NATO commander, testified this week at the war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands, where Slobodan Milosevic faces charges in the massacre of more than 7,000 Bosnian Muslims at Srebrenica in 1995. The session of the United Nations tribunal was closed because of U.S. security concerns, but a transcript of Clark's testimony was released yesterday after review by State Department lawyers. Clark testified that Milosevic, the former Yugoslav leader, knew in advance about the massacre.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 1, 2001
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - Nothing has ever been as it seemed in Slobodan Milosevic's Yugoslavia. He was a dictator who allowed dissent, a war-maker who claimed to be a guarantor of peace, a burly man with gray hair who looked like a ward boss, dressed like a Midwestern businessman and behaved like a mobster robbing his state blind. Above all, the 59-year-old Milosevic, who viewed himself and his people as history's winners, was a loser, a man who gambled and lost vast and valuable parts of his country while hundreds of thousands of people were killed or displaced.
NEWS
December 28, 2000
THE FALL of the Communist dictator Slobodan Milosevic was completed in the Dec. 23 election for parliament of Serbia. Nearly two-thirds of the vote went to the Democratic Opposition and only 14 percent to his Socialists. The downfall began in the Sept. 24 election for president of Yugoslavia, which the dictator tried to steal before conceding to a popular uprising. The winner was Vojislav Kostunica. Mr. Milosevic continued to live in luxury, parts of his regime still responsive. Not now. The reformers have replaced the Yugsoslav military commanders in Monetengro.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | September 26, 2003
CHICAGO - Wesley K. Clark is a presidential candidate whose campaign rests on two rationales: his soldier's biography and his opposition to the war in Iraq. His biography is still intact, but within 24 hours of entering the race, the retired general had managed to turn the Iraq issue into his own personal exploding cigar. For those of us who are generally skeptical about plunging into optional wars, that's not the only reason to wonder if Mr. Clark offers a real alternative to the incumbent.
NEWS
October 8, 2002
THE UNITED STATES is quietly trying to buy votes in Serbia, which may or may not be electing a new president this Sunday. It could easily backfire, since the candidate most closely attuned to Western ways of thinking is likely to fail badly. But a bigger problem is that both candidates might fail - if turnout is less than 50 percent, the election is annulled, and the Balkans' most dangerous country enters uncharted territory. Last week Washington agreed to write off two-thirds of Yugoslavia's debt, and this week Congress takes up a bill normalizing trade relations.
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