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By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1994
Just in time for the return of spring and the boating season, the County Council last night gave marina owners a 50 percent cut in the slip tax.The council voted unanimously to cut the slip tax, which is assessed as a percentage of each docking or storage fee charged by a marina, from 10 percent to 5 percent.Marina owners have long complained that the tax places them at a competitive disadvantage with marinas outside the county because Anne Arundel County is the only subdivision in the state with such a tax."
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Climate forecasters still expect El Nino to develop this fall or winter, but the chances have fallen to about two in three. The National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center in College Park on Thursday upheld the El Niño watch it began in March. Temperatures in the eastern Pacific Ocean along the equator continue to be warmer than normal, a key El Niño indicator. However, most of the benchmarks climate scientists use to track and predict El Niño waned somewhat in July.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | April 4, 1995
The County Council unanimously approved a bill last night that will eliminate within two years a tax imposed on marina boat slip rentals.The legislation, which was sponsored by the seven-member council, will lower the 5 percent slip tax by 1 percent in July. The next year, the tax will fall to 2 percent and it will be repealed altogether by July 1997.At a hearing attended by about 150 to 200 marina owners and employees, Councilman Thomas W. Redmond Sr., the Pasadena Democrat who drafted the bill, said repealing the tax is an economic development initiative.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
The Orioles' margin for error this season has been razor thin. They know it, and the statistics back it up. One mistake or one break has often has been the difference in a season of close calls. Entering Saturday night's game against the Seattle Mariners, seven straight games had been decided by one run. That streak ended in a 6-3 Orioles loss before an announced 36,508 at Camden Yards. It really came down to one swing. Seattle's lone offensive superstar and renowned Orioles killer, Robinson Cano, did the honors.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | March 19, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The endorsement of House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt is but another stop on what seems to be Vice President Al Gore's inexorable march to the Democratic presidential nomination next year.Even before he has declared his candidacy in a formal way, the vice president has taken de facto control of all the party's machinery and won the endorsement of key players at all levels of the party. He is enjoying the kind of run experienced by Sen. Edmund S. Muskie in 1972 and by former Vice President Walter F. Mondale in 1984.
SPORTS
By Tim Cowlishaw and Tim Cowlishaw,Dallas Morning News | October 7, 1990
For the first time in his eight full major-league seasons, Wade Boggs did not finish in the top three in the batting race, did not bat at least .325, did not get 200 hits.The very unBoggs-like totals that the Boston Red Sox's third baseman brings to the American League Championship Series against the Oakland Athletics are a .302 average and 187 hits. After reaching base via hits or walks at least 300 times in each of the last five seasons and six of seven, Boggs reached just 274 times in 1990.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | March 8, 1994
Members of an ailing marina industry last night urged the County Council for some economic relief in the form of a proposed 50 percent cut in the slip tax.Representatives of more than 50 commercial marinas in the county attended the hearing on the bill that would reduce the slip tax -- which is assessed as part of each docking or storage fee charged by a marina -- from 10 percent to 5 percent.A typical slip rents for about $2,000 a year, said Mitch Nathanson, a marina owner and member of a committee of county officials and marina owners appointed by County Executive Robert R. Neall that recommended reducing the slip tax.Steuart Chaney, owner of Herrington Harbor marina, noted that when the slip tax was first adopted 21 years ago all of his slips were filled and there was a long waiting list of new customers.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1999
After weeks of tempest over a plan to move the last two crabbing vessels at City Dock, Annapolis Mayor Dean L. Johnson has orchestrated a game of musical boats to allow them to remain.City officials began talking in March about moving the boats of Charlie Meiklejohn, who has tied up at City Dock for 52 years, and his stepson, Alexander Parkinson, to make room for a 54-foot charter boat that would pay a higher slip fee, $500 a month vs. the watermen's $50.Meiklejohn, 68, was going to have to tie up 90 feet from his current spot, and Parkinson was to be relegated to Eastport.
NEWS
By CAITLIN FRANCKE AND SCOTT HIGHAM and CAITLIN FRANCKE AND SCOTT HIGHAM,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1999
When police carted Gordon Ragler and his wife away in handcuffs last year, neighbors thought the around-the-clock drug dealing in their Southwest Baltimore community had finally come to an end.But 13 months later, the Raglers slipped through a net carefully crafted by undercover drug officers and confidential informants. It didn't seem to matter that police conducted hours of surveillance of open-air drug sales or collected solid evidence to make their case: 50 bags of cocaine and a loaded semiautomatic pistol.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2001
"Chrysler doles out 26,000 pink slips" "More pink slips at high-tech firms" "The `pink slips' are falling like confetti" Read the headlines and it seems that just about everybody is being handed a pink slip these days. Everybody, that is, except Peter Liebhold. And he's feeling just a tad jealous. A curator at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, Liebhold has spent more than a decade trying to crack a minor mystery of American business: Just what the heck is a pink slip, anyway?
NEWS
By Heather Patti | June 13, 2014
A new mega outlet mall - planned for right next to the White Marsh Mall - is being slipped through Baltimore County's development process without any public consideration by the County Council of traffic, the surrounding retail market, the environment or dozens of other potential impacts on the community. More than five years ago, developers first proposed a mixed-use project for the 88-acre property known as Nottingham Ridge off of Philadelphia Road and White Marsh Boulevard. They planned a mix of homes, office space and hotels, plus a modest amount of restaurant and retail that would be aimed at basic services for that community.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers saw its earnings slide in the fourth quarter as the menswear retailer attempted to fight off a takeover by Men's Wearhouse. The Hampstead-based retailer ultimately succumbed, agreeing to a $1.8 billion merger with its larger rival in March. For the quarter ended Feb. 1, Bank reported that it earned $27.4 million, down from $28.4 million in the comparable quarter a year earlier. Earnings per share slipped to 98 cents from $1.01. Bank said legal and advisory costs related to the takeover battle reduced its earnings per share by 7 cents.
HEALTH
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
This spring, a group of college students will go about their usual campus routines, but with a voice only they can hear calling them names and making other distracting, disturbing sounds. In their case, the voice will come from a recording playing through earbuds as part of a research study. But researchers say the exercise could ultimately help increase awareness and break down the stigma that prevents those who suffer from auditory hallucinations and other symptoms of mental illness from getting the help they need.
NEWS
March 10, 2014
The announcement last week by Maryland's Board of Revenue Estimates that the state will be taking in $238 million less in taxes this year and next was certainly unwelcome, and it complicates the already difficult task the General Assembly faces in enacting a balanced budget before it adjourns in April. The amount of tooth-gnashing it has prompted, however, is wildly out of proportion to its actual impact on the state's overall spending plans. Comptroller Peter Franchot, who as chairman of the Board of Revenue Estimates was on hand to approve the new figures on Thursday, told The Washington post that the numbers are "proof positive that something is wrong.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | March 3, 2014
In my last Baltimore Sun op-ed column , I noted that Baltimore's mayors often have their eye on anything but being the mayor of Baltimore. Obviously, the column struck a nerve with the current Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. In her response , Rawlings-Blake did nothing to counter my claims that she is more focused on her job as Secretary of the Democratic National Committee than she is with being Mayor of Baltimore. Almost as if to prove my point about how her eye is off the ball, I refer you to Sunday's episode of Meet the Press , in which the mayor was one of the guests on the political panel.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | February 2, 2014
Chew on these for a minute: "Who are they? Are they these extreme conservatives, who are right-to-life, pro-assault-weapon, anti-gay, is that who they are? Because if that is who they are, and if they are the extreme conservatives, they have no place in the state of New York. Because that is not who New Yorkers are. " - New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, with a directive for New York's GOP candidates last month. "It's not surprising then they get bitter. They cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren't like them.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2004
SANTA CLARA, Calif. - Michael Phelps took a bow and then a flop, but finished in his accustomed position. The 37th annual Santa Clara International Invitational nearly got off to a disastrous start for the presumptive swim star of the 2004 Olympics. Phelps got a warm greeting during introductions for the 400-meter individual medley, then had his back foot slip on a slick starting block. Instead of extending into the water for the butterfly leg, Phelps used more of a jackknife entry borrowed from Captain Klutz, an old Mad magazine character.
NEWS
December 9, 1996
THERE'S A NEW DANCE in town -- but this one is done at the wheel. Call it the "stoplight slip."It goes like this: Slow up in the lane of traffic, then come to a stop. Grind your teeth as the lead car holds everyone up to turn; then zip by the other jerks (illegally) on the right shoulder.Baltimore resident Chris Hart calls this maneuver "the nastiest traffic fad.""I have witnessed this stupid move four times in the last week in both urban and suburban settings," Hart wrote Intrepid One. "This careless jerk has to make a quick adjustment to get around parked cars on the right on the other side of the intersection or at least do some dicey moves to beat out the cars that are entering the intersection on green."
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | January 23, 2014
Thomas Voss, a top trainer of steeplechase and flat race horses, died suddenly at his Monkton farm on Tuesday. His family confirmed the death of Mr. Voss, who was 63. The cause was an apparent heart attack. "This is a great loss. We are all just stunned," said Maryanna Skowronski, a longtime friend of the Voss family, who is director of the Historical Society of Harford County. Though Mr. Voss trained both flat and steeplechase runners, his greatest success was with the latter.
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