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NEWS
By Art Buchwald | February 3, 1992
YOU HAVE probably seen the Daily Slime in the supermarkets by the cash registers. Some of you may wonder who puts this stuff out. The editor of the Daily Slime is a friend of mine named Charley Smut. Charley and I were sharing a pizza when he said: "They're starting to take us seriously.""Who is they?""The press and television. The New York Times used to be the pacesetter for news in this country. Now it's the Daily Slime.""Doesn't it get you mad that the legit papers are stealing your scoops?"
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NEWS
June 7, 2014
I am dismayed at the misrepresentations Connie DeJuliis has expressed about herself and her opponent, Sen. Jim Brochin in a flurry of negative political mailers ( "Brochin, DeJuliis square off in redrawn north county district," May 17). Ms. DeJuliis recently sent out a mailer with the emblem from National Abortion Rights Action League on it, but in fact NARAL endorsed Senator Brochin not Ms. DeJuliis in this race. In addition, Ms. DeJuliis mentions her first career as delegate in Annapolis but fails to mention that in her four years of service she missed an astonishing 1,000 votes.
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NEWS
Andrea K. Walker | March 22, 2012
Giant Food, the region's largest grocery chain, became the latest area supermarket Thursday to declare it would stop selling meat with the additive known as pink slime. The Landover-based company is among a growing number of supermarkets pulling the product from its shelves because of concern from shoppers, even though food regulators say pink slime, also known as "finely textured beef," passes food safety standards. "While the USDA … has indicated this product is safe for consumption and complies with all applicable standards for lean beef, many of our customers voiced concern regarding finely textured beef," Giant said in a statement.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2012
My lawn has a patch of what looks like cigarette ash stuck to the grass blades. What is it, and what can I do about it? This fungus can cause quite a stir when it suddenly appears in spring, summer or fall, but it's harmless, so no control is required. Slime mold uses the grass blades only for support. It grows on microorganisms and organic matter in thatch and moves to grass blades when it's ready to produce fruiting bodies (the spore-producing stage.) These fruiting bodies are sticky and dark when fresh but dry to a dark or light-gray cigarette-like ash that brushes right off. Rainfall, mowing or light raking easily removes it. Slime mold sometimes will show up on liriope, grasslike flowering plants.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | March 23, 2012
Wegmans Food Markets Inc. said today they will also stop selling meat with an additive known as pink slime. Thebyproduct comes from fatty scraps leftover after steaks and roasts are cut from a cow. The meat bits are heated to soften them and then spun to remove the fat and separate the meat. Ammonia is used to kill bacteria. The filler is sometimes mixed into fattier meat to create a leaner product. The USDA said pink slime passes food safety standards but many retailers have been pulling it from shelves because of concern from shoppers.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
Clad in the uniform of video rebellion, hundreds of children mass around an inflatable television nearly as tall as Marley Middle School. A TV producer shouts into a bullhorn, leading the throng in a chorus of "NICK, NICK, NICK, NICK."Days of Rage meets Bozo the Clown and Marshall McLuhan. Strange shades of 1960s campus unrest brought to you this time by Hasbro and General Foods and the marketing folks at the Nickelodeon children's cable television network.They know more about kids than Bozo ever dreamed, because Bozo didn't know a focus group from a Cub Scout jamboree.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | August 12, 1991
People will do anything for fame.Take this weekend at Glen Burnie Mall. Adults urged children to "think slimy thoughts" while spectators screamed, "SLIME!" and hundreds of youngsters competed for the privilege of having green goo dumped on their heads.But more was at stake than just the fun of getting good and messy. The children were auditioning to win a trip to the Florida studio of Nickelodeon, a children's TV network, and a tour of Universal Studios.One thousand children auditioned Saturday and Sunday, and fourfinalists were picked to be "slimed" -- and win the trip and an appearance on a Nickelodeon cable show or on-air promo.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1997
Science can be a lot of gooey, messy fun.That's what visitors to the Columbus Center in Baltimore learned yesterday as they queued up to make red, blue and green "slime" in the name of chemistry.As part of National Chemistry Week, which began yesterday, the center and the Maryland chapter of the American Chemical Society joined forces for a "Get-Your-Hands-On-Science" day, designed to emphasize the importance of chemistry in the marine world and the fun of it."Think of polyvinyl alcohol as a million little bits of spaghetti," said Towson University chemistry Professor Mark Greenburg as he squirted the chemical into small cups for a rapt audience.
NEWS
November 10, 1996
Generation X'ers show ignorance about votingI am appalled with the response from the obviously uninformed students in the article, "Trust irrelevant to young voters," by C. Fraser Smith in the Nov. 4 issue of The Sun. I am ashamed to be lumped into the category of these young politically unwashed voters.I completely disagree with trust not being a major issue in the race for the presidency. Trust has everything to do with selecting a moral leader and diplomat of this country. The United States should be represented by an individual whose moral caliber is exceptional, and most of all someone we can trust.
NEWS
By Diane Mikulis and Diane Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 2000
For some children at Ilchester Elementary School in eastern Ellicott City, learning doesn't stop when the school bell rings at the end of the day. Twenty-eight schoolchildren are involved in after-school programs in which they perform science experiments and make crafts. The school's PTA oversees the program, which is offered to everyone enrolled at Ilchester. "We thought it would be great to give them a chance to pursue other areas of interest that aren't in the curriculum," said Doreen Klose, a PTA vice president and the program's coordinator.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | March 23, 2012
Wegmans Food Markets Inc. said today they will also stop selling meat with an additive known as pink slime. Thebyproduct comes from fatty scraps leftover after steaks and roasts are cut from a cow. The meat bits are heated to soften them and then spun to remove the fat and separate the meat. Ammonia is used to kill bacteria. The filler is sometimes mixed into fattier meat to create a leaner product. The USDA said pink slime passes food safety standards but many retailers have been pulling it from shelves because of concern from shoppers.
NEWS
Andrea K. Walker | March 22, 2012
Giant Food, the region's largest grocery chain, became the latest area supermarket Thursday to declare it would stop selling meat with the additive known as pink slime. The Landover-based company is among a growing number of supermarkets pulling the product from its shelves because of concern from shoppers, even though food regulators say pink slime, also known as "finely textured beef," passes food safety standards. "While the USDA … has indicated this product is safe for consumption and complies with all applicable standards for lean beef, many of our customers voiced concern regarding finely textured beef," Giant said in a statement.
NEWS
May 15, 2010
The problem: "Green slime" grows behind a building in Riverside in South Baltimore. The back story: What do you do if you fear The Blob has moved into your neighborhood? While taking a walk, Dawn Dulaney and her husband noticed what she described as "green slime" on a sidewalk in the 1400 block of Stevenson St. The green stuff was on the sidewalk, and there was some trash mixed in, she said in a call to Watchdog. She worried that it was mold or a substance that could harm people, pets or the environment.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | March 2, 2008
After whipping up the crowd for a John McCain appearance in Cincinnati last week, Ohio radio talker Bill Cunningham got a scolding from the Arizona Republican senator for smearing Sen. Barack Obama, whom he repeatedly referred to as "Barack Hussein Obama." A day earlier, a photo of Obama in a turban during a diplomatic trip to Africa somehow found its way to the Drudge Report online. But you could have already told the presidential race was getting slimier from the blogosphere, which acts as a graphic, if unscientific, political seismograph.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | September 22, 2007
Slime flux, also called wetwood, infects many shade trees such as oaks and maples. This bacteria or yeast fungus enters tree wounds to live off nutrients in its sap. Sap is forced out of the wound by pressure from the organisms' gasses. Sometimes this escaping gas produces a "whistle" -- to the surprise of passers-by. When fresh, slime flux may have an alcohol odor and leave black streaks on the bark. It doesn't hurt trees, and there is no treatment. Declining trees should be inspected by a certified arborist.
NEWS
By KENNETH R. WEISS and KENNETH R. WEISS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 30, 2006
MORETON BAY, Australia --The fireweed began each spring as tufts of hairy growth and spread across the seafloor fast enough to cover a football field in an hour. When fishermen touched it, their skin broke out in searing welts. Their lips blistered and peeled. Their eyes burned and swelled shut. Water that splashed from their nets spread the inflammation to their legs and torsos. "It comes up like little boils," said Randolph Van Dyk, a fisherman whose powerful legs are pocked with scars.
FEATURES
By Kelly A. J. Powers and Kelly A. J. Powers,Special to The Sun | December 3, 1994
Nothing is funnier to a kid than mess. The messier, the `D gloppier, the sloppier . . . the better.No one understands this as much, or makes as much money at it, as Nickelodeon, the children's cable channel. One of Nickelodeon's most popular game shows is "Double Dare," which spun off several other shows, including: "Family Double Dare," "What Would You Do?" and "Super Sloppy Double Dare."The live show combining all of these comes to the Baltimore Arena tomorrow.Even if your kids don't have access to cable, they know about "Double Dare."
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | March 20, 1991
One of the "ooey-gooey polymers" -- slime, if you must know -- proved to be some trouble for 14-year-old Sharon Chen.The Liberty HighSchool freshman followed instructions, using a wooden stick to mix poly (vinyl alcohol) and a sodium borate solution in a paper cup.Despite constant stirring, the liquid was not forming into a slimy blob."Give it a chance," said Carol Rouzer, an assistant professor of chemistry at Western Maryland College. "You were just behind alittle bit. It'll get slimy."The slime -- and later glop, an Elmers glue-like substance -- was the centerpiece of one of four lab experiments some 80 freshman conducted during the annual Carroll County High School Science Day at Western Maryland College.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 17, 2005
NEW ORLEANS - Mike Bordelone hadn't planned to return to his Mid-City restaurant just yet - he wasn't ready to deal with the swollen furniture or the brown slime - but his plans changed abruptly when he heard the news: People are coming back to New Orleans. So he hung a gun on his hip and slogged into Liuzza's Restaurant and Bar to crack open the ATM and get his money out, before someone else did. With each blow of the hammer and pry of the crowbar, desperation grew closer to a state of panic.
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