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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
Success came fast and furious for guitar whiz Derek Trucks. At 9, he was hailed as a slide guitar prodigy. As a teenager, he was touring with his own band. At 19, he joined the Allman Brothers as a full-time member. He even toured with legend Eric Clapton. Now 30, Trucks has spent just about half his life on the road, either with his own band or supporting the Allman Brothers. His career took off quick and has never slowed down. Saturday, he headlines the Hot August Blues Festival in Oregon Ridge Park.
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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
Success came fast and furious for guitar whiz Derek Trucks. At 9, he was hailed as a slide guitar prodigy. As a teenager, he was touring with his own band. At 19, he joined the Allman Brothers as a full-time member. He even toured with legend Eric Clapton. Now 30, Trucks has spent just about half his life on the road, either with his own band or supporting the Allman Brothers. His career took off quick and has never slowed down. Saturday, he headlines the Hot August Blues Festival in Oregon Ridge Park.
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FEATURES
By Scott Benarde and Scott Benarde,Cox News Service | June 27, 1991
SUCCESS has not changed or spoiled singer-guitarist Bonnie Raitt. Last year Raitt won four Grammys -- three for her 1989 album "Nick of Time." Raitt's follow-up album, "Luck of the Draw" (Capitol Records), released today, is a close cousin in mood and style to "Nick of Time."Raitt wisely hasn't tried to fix what ain't broke; her music remains firmly rooted in Delta blues and Southern rhythm and blues. She's used the same producer, Don Was, and some of the same backup musicians and songwriters who helped make "Nick of Time" a hit that sold 3 million copies, resulting in a stellar career comeback.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
High-energy Stones show is worth the wait Thirty-six years may have passed since the Rolling Stones last played Baltimore, but on Wednesday night Mick, Keith and the boys made the passage of time seem irrelevant with a relentless, classics-heavy set of archetypal rock and roll that cemented their reputation as ... well, you know. For more than three decades, the Stones have been ballyhooed as the World's Greatest Rock and Roll Band, a tag that sometimes has seemed more like an albatross around the band's neck than a testimonial to its collective talent and longevity.
NEWS
By RAFAEL ALVAREZ | May 2, 1993
Lexington, Miss.-- Trying to describe the music of Elmore James, someone said the other day, is like trying to describe a primary color.A color that screams your name as you walk by.That cries all night long.And bleeds.Not just on you, but through you.All the way through to the other side.The color is blue.Electric blue.And it came down in buckets when the great Elmore James opened his mouth."When Elmo played the blues you could feel a chill going over you," remembers guitarist Jimmy Spruill, who made records with James in the 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 28, 1990
SHAKING THE TREEPeter Gabriel (Geffen 24326)There is a difference between a "Greatest Hits" collection, and a "Best Of" compilation, and few albums make that point more clearly than Peter Gabriel's "Shaking the Tree." Sure, it has hits -- "Solsbury Hill," "Shock the Monkey" and "Sledgehammer" are all included -- but the album's greatest strength is that its 16 selections go beyond the expected to show just what makes Gabriel's work so special. And though his songs are often demanding, whether ethnic experiments like the wondrously hypnotic title tune or haunting ballads like the remade "Here Comes the Flood," they reward the listener in ways more accessible pop never manages.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
High-energy Stones show is worth the wait Thirty-six years may have passed since the Rolling Stones last played Baltimore, but on Wednesday night Mick, Keith and the boys made the passage of time seem irrelevant with a relentless, classics-heavy set of archetypal rock and roll that cemented their reputation as ... well, you know. For more than three decades, the Stones have been ballyhooed as the World's Greatest Rock and Roll Band, a tag that sometimes has seemed more like an albatross around the band's neck than a testimonial to its collective talent and longevity.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1998
Archie Edwards, who played acoustic guitar and sang the blues for more than 70 years, died Thursday of cancer at his Seat Pleasant home. He was 79.His last performance in Baltimore was two months ago, when he performed for students at Carter G. Woodson Elementary School in Cherry Hill.For nearly 40 years, he owned the two-chair Alpha Tonsorial Barbershop in Northeast Washington, where musicians and blues aficionados gathered Saturdays for jam sessions with "Brother Arch."Dressed in a three-piece suit and wearing a fedora or cap, he would listen to the young musicians and offer encouragement.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 29, 1992
Time was when a record company would only put together a boxed-set-collection if it was dealing with the work of a major artist.Someone like Bob Dylan. Or Eric Clapton. Or Miles Davis. Or Muddy Waters. Or James Borwn.Giants, one an all. Now, of course, we know that boxed sets aren't just a means of paying tribute to a means of paying tribute to a great musician--they're also a way to make money. Perhaps that's why it now seems as if any pop star with a big enought back catalog and relatively fervent fans has a boxed set of some sort in the stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | June 1, 2006
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Dave Cipriani, 19-string Indian slide guitar, classical and electric guitars; Adam Hopkins, upright bass; Chris Lerch, drums Founded in --2004 Style --jazz funk with Indian overtones Influenced by --Pandit Barun; Kumar Pal; Medeski, Martin and Wood; John Coltrane; Miles Davis; G. Love and Special Sauce Notable --At their shows, Cipriani will play Indian or electric guitars, depending on the song. He learned to play classically first and then tackled blues and country.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1998
Archie Edwards, who played acoustic guitar and sang the blues for more than 70 years, died Thursday of cancer at his Seat Pleasant home. He was 79.His last performance in Baltimore was two months ago, when he performed for students at Carter G. Woodson Elementary School in Cherry Hill.For nearly 40 years, he owned the two-chair Alpha Tonsorial Barbershop in Northeast Washington, where musicians and blues aficionados gathered Saturdays for jam sessions with "Brother Arch."Dressed in a three-piece suit and wearing a fedora or cap, he would listen to the young musicians and offer encouragement.
NEWS
By RAFAEL ALVAREZ | May 2, 1993
Lexington, Miss.-- Trying to describe the music of Elmore James, someone said the other day, is like trying to describe a primary color.A color that screams your name as you walk by.That cries all night long.And bleeds.Not just on you, but through you.All the way through to the other side.The color is blue.Electric blue.And it came down in buckets when the great Elmore James opened his mouth."When Elmo played the blues you could feel a chill going over you," remembers guitarist Jimmy Spruill, who made records with James in the 1950s.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 29, 1992
Time was when a record company would only put together a boxed-set-collection if it was dealing with the work of a major artist.Someone like Bob Dylan. Or Eric Clapton. Or Miles Davis. Or Muddy Waters. Or James Borwn.Giants, one an all. Now, of course, we know that boxed sets aren't just a means of paying tribute to a means of paying tribute to a great musician--they're also a way to make money. Perhaps that's why it now seems as if any pop star with a big enought back catalog and relatively fervent fans has a boxed set of some sort in the stores.
FEATURES
By Scott Benarde and Scott Benarde,Cox News Service | June 27, 1991
SUCCESS has not changed or spoiled singer-guitarist Bonnie Raitt. Last year Raitt won four Grammys -- three for her 1989 album "Nick of Time." Raitt's follow-up album, "Luck of the Draw" (Capitol Records), released today, is a close cousin in mood and style to "Nick of Time."Raitt wisely hasn't tried to fix what ain't broke; her music remains firmly rooted in Delta blues and Southern rhythm and blues. She's used the same producer, Don Was, and some of the same backup musicians and songwriters who helped make "Nick of Time" a hit that sold 3 million copies, resulting in a stellar career comeback.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 28, 1990
SHAKING THE TREEPeter Gabriel (Geffen 24326)There is a difference between a "Greatest Hits" collection, and a "Best Of" compilation, and few albums make that point more clearly than Peter Gabriel's "Shaking the Tree." Sure, it has hits -- "Solsbury Hill," "Shock the Monkey" and "Sledgehammer" are all included -- but the album's greatest strength is that its 16 selections go beyond the expected to show just what makes Gabriel's work so special. And though his songs are often demanding, whether ethnic experiments like the wondrously hypnotic title tune or haunting ballads like the remade "Here Comes the Flood," they reward the listener in ways more accessible pop never manages.
NEWS
May 13, 2004
Edward William Hartlove Jr., a retired truck driver and former Southwest Baltimore tavern owner, died of lung cancer May 6 at his Church Hill home in Queen Anne's County. He was 63. Born in Baltimore and raised on Christian Street, he attended city public schools. Mr. Hartlove owned and operated Hartlove's Tavern at Christian and Payson streets, a business he purchased from his father. "He was well known for having the coldest beer in Baltimore," said his wife of 22 years, the former Debra Kay Anderson.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | February 26, 1993
Holly Springs,Miss. -- TWO or three times a month, the phone rings in R.L. Burnside's little farmhouse on Highway 4; calls from strangers asking if they can stop by to talk about the blues.The last time Mr. Burnside's phone jumped with a curious ring, the callers were pilgrims from Baltimore."Sure, I remember you," said the 66-year-old guitarist who learned his lessons by watching Mississippi Fred McDowell and Muddy Waters. "Come on over."I had met "Rule" Burnside once before, when he played at the Cat's Eye Pub on Thames Street in May 1986.
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