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NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 7, 2008
[Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment] Featuring the voices of Mary Costa, Bill Shirley, Eleanor Audley. Directed by Clyde Geronimi $29.99 (Blu-ray $35.99) *** 1/2 dvds The success of Disney's Enchanted helped revive the fortunes of its earlier Sleeping Beauty. Released in 1959, Sleeping Beauty was the last of the studio's classic fairy tale adaptations and, to many, the last film of the studio's vaunted Golden Age (though some argue that benchmark belongs to 1967's The Jungle Book, the last animated film Walt Disney actually worked on before his death in 1966)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
CHURCHVILLE, Md . – The princesses who inhabit author E.D. Baker's 10 children's books are more likely to have a laugh like a honking goose than like a tinkling bell. Baker's royal heroines curtsy clumsily, can't make small talk and are occasionally mistaken for one of the servants. Every single one of them is immersed in the natural world. And, because these young women have a tendency to trip over their oversized feet, they frequently return to the castle covered head to toe with some of the natural world's more odiferous substances.
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NEWS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1997
In the moments before he stepped into the multipurpose room at Gwynns Falls Elementary School, Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke offered an apology for the shiny red robe he would be wearing for the next hour."
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 7, 2008
[Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment] Featuring the voices of Mary Costa, Bill Shirley, Eleanor Audley. Directed by Clyde Geronimi $29.99 (Blu-ray $35.99) *** 1/2 dvds The success of Disney's Enchanted helped revive the fortunes of its earlier Sleeping Beauty. Released in 1959, Sleeping Beauty was the last of the studio's classic fairy tale adaptations and, to many, the last film of the studio's vaunted Golden Age (though some argue that benchmark belongs to 1967's The Jungle Book, the last animated film Walt Disney actually worked on before his death in 1966)
NEWS
By Marc Peters and Marc Peters,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
The National Marionette Theatre and its founder, master puppeteer Daniel Syrotiak, will present the classic children's story Sleeping Beauty on Sunday at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. The show is part of the Candlelight Concert Society's Performing Arts Series for Children. "The professionalism will appeal to adults - they can sit back and relax and enjoy the show without having to worry about not being entertained," said Syrotiak, who hopes to draw all ages to the show. "It is very exciting to see three generations of a family - children, parents, and grandparents - come to a show together," he said.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | January 16, 1991
One hundred years is a long time for a woman to wait for the right man to come along, but in "The Sleeping Beauty of Loreland," it turns out to be a worthwhile wait.The North Carroll High School Drama Club will present children's author Frances Homer's modern remake of Charles Perrault's classic "Sleeping Beauty" Friday and Saturday in the school auditorium."It's basically the same story as "Sleeping Beauty," with a few minor differences," explained drama teacher Roberta Rooney, the play'sdirector.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
When opera singer Mary Costa comes to the Margaret Smith Gallery in Ellicott City on Sunday, she is likely to be greeted by a small army of enchanted viewers of the 1959 Walt Disney animated classic "Sleeping Beauty."Costa, the voice of Princess Aurora/Briar Rose in the film, will appear at the gallery to sign certificates of authenticity for original art from the film in which the character -- better known as Sleeping Beauty -- appears.Gallery owner Margaret Smith says she is excited about the visit.
NEWS
By EDUARDO CUE | April 19, 1992
Paris. -- The American Dream arrived just outside Paris this week in the form of the EuroDisney amusement park, and while France welcomed Mickey Mouse and his friends with uncharacteristic enthusiasm, some here are wondering if the presence of an American enclave in the heart of Europe will not turn into a nightmare.Once proud of smirking at anything American, the French turned last Sunday's opening into a state occasion. The national press covered the inauguration as if it were one of the most important events in modern French history, and for weeks people seemed to have little else on their minds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | August 26, 1999
'Country Boy' and baseballThank God he was a country boy. Or what would we play during the 7th inning stretch? John Denver gave the fans of Baltimore a lively, foot-stomping song to clap to during Orioles home games. The Babe Ruth Museum is giving the fans a history lesson on the classic song at its newest exhibit, "Thank God I'm a Country Boy," which opens tomorrow.The exhibit chronicles the 1973 hit song from its genesis and through its 23-year history as the Orioles' 7th-inning stretch song.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | March 18, 2004
`Sleeping Beauty' Catch a new version of the old classic fairytale Sleeping Beauty, presented by Pumpkin Theatre, this weekend and next weekend at the Hannah More Arts Center at St. Timothy's School in Stevenson. The show, written for Pumpkin Theatre by local playwright David Rawlings Brown, offers a new take on the classic Disney story about a sleeping princess. Baltimore School for the Arts students Shannon Cusack and Christopher Wicks star as Sleeping Beauty and the Prince. Playing the Good Fairies are Liz Boyer Hunnicutt, Tiffany Walker Porta and Cynthia Rinaldi.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun Reporter | March 23, 2008
Absinthe, legend has it, starred in the very first cocktail. Pale green, potent and deadly alluring, the drink in its day spawned a verb, a disease and, in Paris, its very own intoxicating time of day - L'heure Verte. To painters, poets and their imitators, absinthe became liquid muse, sipped, swirled and savored with passion until its ban a century ago. American importers and distillers, thirsty to revive a taste of the past, last year persuaded the government to end the 100-year prohibition.
NEWS
By KARA WEDEKIND | November 6, 2005
SUN BLISSFULLY FUNNY-- Often referred to as the modern era's Oscar Wilde, Noel Coward used his witty and urbane writing style to bring to life the eccentric Bliss family in his classic comedy Hay Fever. Center Stage, at 700 N. Calvert St., is putting its own spin on this comic tale of a weekend retreat that goes awry. The show runs through Dec. 4. Tonight is the last night of previews (and preview prices). $10-$40. 410-332-0033 or centerstage.org. MON TALKING PICTURES -- A screening and discussion of David Mamet's Oleanna, about a professor (William H. Macy)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 5, 2004
When your bedtime is 8 p.m. or earlier, going to a dinner theater doesn't quite fit your schedule. Fortunately for the 12-and-under set, a few area theaters offer lunch and a show. With menu choices such as cheese pizza, a hot dog or peanut butter and jelly sandwich and shows including Sleeping Beauty, Jack and the Beanstalk and Charlotte's Web, kids have a chance to get caught up in the excitement of a live performance. Luckily for parents, the experience is also affordable family entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | March 18, 2004
`Sleeping Beauty' Catch a new version of the old classic fairytale Sleeping Beauty, presented by Pumpkin Theatre, this weekend and next weekend at the Hannah More Arts Center at St. Timothy's School in Stevenson. The show, written for Pumpkin Theatre by local playwright David Rawlings Brown, offers a new take on the classic Disney story about a sleeping princess. Baltimore School for the Arts students Shannon Cusack and Christopher Wicks star as Sleeping Beauty and the Prince. Playing the Good Fairies are Liz Boyer Hunnicutt, Tiffany Walker Porta and Cynthia Rinaldi.
NEWS
By Marc Peters and Marc Peters,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
The National Marionette Theatre and its founder, master puppeteer Daniel Syrotiak, will present the classic children's story Sleeping Beauty on Sunday at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. The show is part of the Candlelight Concert Society's Performing Arts Series for Children. "The professionalism will appeal to adults - they can sit back and relax and enjoy the show without having to worry about not being entertained," said Syrotiak, who hopes to draw all ages to the show. "It is very exciting to see three generations of a family - children, parents, and grandparents - come to a show together," he said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2000
For the first time in local memory, there's a waiting list to buy the huge, old houses in Baltimore's Mount Vernon neighborhood - residences in good condition, with views of the Washington Monument, sweeping staircases and butler's pantries. The shortage of houses in move-in condition frustrates sales agents and community leaders, who would like to see more owner-occupants fill the houses that frequently are the size of an embassy or a funeral parlor. They are also acutely aware that their neighborhood of 3,526 on the fringe of downtown Baltimore - roughly the nine blocks along the Charles Street corridor from Hamilton Street to Mount Royal Avenue, from Howard Street on the west to Guilford Avenue on the east - needs fresh money and new ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 5, 2004
When your bedtime is 8 p.m. or earlier, going to a dinner theater doesn't quite fit your schedule. Fortunately for the 12-and-under set, a few area theaters offer lunch and a show. With menu choices such as cheese pizza, a hot dog or peanut butter and jelly sandwich and shows including Sleeping Beauty, Jack and the Beanstalk and Charlotte's Web, kids have a chance to get caught up in the excitement of a live performance. Luckily for parents, the experience is also affordable family entertainment.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 22, 1995
It's not as strange as it might seem that the Spotlighters Theatre is producing Charles Busch's double bill, "Sleeping Beauty or Coma" and "Vampire Lesbians of Sodom."This theater has a reputation for giving directors and performers a chance to, well, take chances. More to the point, one of the performers the Spotlighters nurtured was David Drake, whose big break came in 1987 when he succeeded Busch in the starring roles in the long-running off-Broadway production of "Sleeping Beauty" and "Vampire Lesbians."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2000
This weekend, the Ballet Theatre of Annapolis ends its season with a program devoted to fairy tales. The performance will begin with "Fairy Tale Highlights" choreographed by artistic director Edward Stewart. Fairy tale characters will be featured from children's literature, including "Snow White and the Seven Dwarves," "Alice in Wonderland," "Puss 'N Boots and the White Cat" and "Tales of Beatrix Potter." BTA's 26-member company will perform with student dancers from Anne Arundel County and the Eastern Shore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | August 26, 1999
'Country Boy' and baseballThank God he was a country boy. Or what would we play during the 7th inning stretch? John Denver gave the fans of Baltimore a lively, foot-stomping song to clap to during Orioles home games. The Babe Ruth Museum is giving the fans a history lesson on the classic song at its newest exhibit, "Thank God I'm a Country Boy," which opens tomorrow.The exhibit chronicles the 1973 hit song from its genesis and through its 23-year history as the Orioles' 7th-inning stretch song.
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