Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSleeping Bags
IN THE NEWS

Sleeping Bags

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2002
There's nothing more tiresome than seeing yet another TV sports highlight clip of a poor fan snoring away during a baseball game. Well, hold the jokes about the national pastime putting people to sleep. This weekend, the ballpark has become a perfectly acceptable field of dreams. Two hundred fifty fans attending last night's game between the White Sox and Montreal Expos at Chicago's Comiskey Park got to sleep over. Right on the field. They got to camp out in the very spot where Magglio Ordonez camps out under fly balls.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
About 8:30 Friday morning, Brian Dorr emerged, with a large smile and his arms raised, from the Apple Store at The Mall in Columbia, as blue-shirted employees cheered and slapped him high-fives. He and his wife, Donna, got what they came for: the third-generation iPad. While the rest of the mall's stores were closed and window displays were dark, a line formed around the second-floor Apple Store as shoppers gathered to purchase Apple's latest coveted gadget. Apple started selling its newest tablet Friday, betting that the sharper screen and faster chip will extend its lead over Google and Amazon.com in the growing market.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2004
By 8 o'clock on a recent night, the streets of Baltimore were virtually deserted as wind gusts of 32 mph drove temperatures into the teens and people inside. Patrick Rhodes and Melissa Faith Coleman were two exceptions. They spent part of the night roaming the streets of Baltimore, seeking out homeless people who might be in need of a sleeping bag. They found one man just off of Fleet Street near Eaton Street. He was seeking sanctuary from the biting Arctic air behind two pea-green utility boxes.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Kevin Rector,Sun reporter | August 2, 2008
The boyfriend of an Aberdeen woman who was found dead Wednesday afternoon in a sleeping bag on the side of a rural Harford County road was arrested and charged with murder yesterday, state police said. Tyrone L. Wiggins, 48, of the 700 block of W. Bel Air Ave. was charged with first-degree and second-degree murder in the death of Jodie S. Davis, 41, of the 700 block of Clayton St. in Aberdeen, said Gregory Shipley, a Maryland State Police spokesman. Davis was shot with a handgun while she was in Wiggins' apartment Tuesday night, police said.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 5, 1992
Sitting outdoors in a football stadium during fall and winter games can be a chilly way to spend several hours. A blanket can help ward off the cold, of course. But now there is another way people can stay warm: They can climb into a bag.Marvel Putnam, a retired circus tent maker, has designed a stadium bag that he said works better than a blanket for a person sitting in the stands. His invention, the Snug-L-Bun, is a nylon bag that slips over a person's feet, legs and lower chest.Although the pouch looks somewhat like a sleeping bag, it is designed to weigh less and to repel rain or spilled drinks.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff Writer | September 27, 1992
It was the can openers that prompted Steve Justis to turn humanitarian.The Annapolis businessman read a news report about the victims of Hurricane Andrew, the displaced families who have received canned goods but have no way to get the cans open.Prompted by the irony of the situation, Mr. Justis joined other county residents in gathering much-needed goods for the hurricane victims. He plans to drive a truck to South Florida next weekend to distribute the items personally.Mr. Justis said a truck will be set up near the Crownsville post office, starting beginning tomorrow, to receive donated goods.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 13, 1997
AS I TYPE THIS, I find myself in the advanced stages of sleep deprivation after a weekend stay with an old college roommate.On the first night, Matt's wife uttered the five most frightening words in the English language: "You take the pull-out couch."As usual, the bed had the same thin, lumpy mattress they give to heroin traffickers in Malaysian jails.It also featured the standard-issue metal bar that jabs viciously into your back no matter what position you try to sleep in.Finally, there was this interesting touch: Both legs at the bottom of the frame were bent, causing the bed to list downward at a 30-degree angle.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
Phil Pietrolungo wouldn't mind a single 24-hour shift right about now. Fueled by Pepsi and Marlboro Mediums, the Baltimore County public works driver has been plowing snow since Friday night. He's gotten about eight hours' sleep in that time, most of it in the front seat of his truck. And he probably won't get to his house in Parkville until tomorrow at the earliest. For a plow operator during the worst area snowstorm in 81 years, life has become a blur of white mounds, gray slush and caffeine jolts.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | February 11, 1991
Stephen Blake, who spent 10 years as an executive with stylish retailer Webster Clothes, says he still "leans to European styling in my suits," but when it comes to business he has taken a more casual approach to fashion.Mr. Blake recently took the helm at the parent company of Sunny's Surplus, Elkridge-based Essex Co., as its president and chief executive officer after Rosedale-based Webster was bought out by a large St. Louis chain in October.Sunny's, which has 20 stores in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington, is widely known for its military gear -- quite different from the $16 Giorgio Armani socks and $70 Peter Maxx ties Websters carries.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff | December 20, 1998
Better sleeping arrangementsWhen Cathy Williams designed a more comfortable sleeping bag for her daughter Katie, she didn't realize she also was creating a company.But 18 months later, the Rodgers Forge mother has a mail-order business featuring fleece hats, scarves, reversible baby buntings, blankets, pillowcases - and of course sleeping bags - that has been touted in Parents and American Girl magazines.Necessity played a big part in her first invention. Katie, then 8, often complained about her slumber bag being bulky and difficult to zip. Two months and eight tries later, Williams came up with a fleece version that fastened shut.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Columnist | December 26, 2006
If you're reading this space for a rousing rendition of The 12 Days of Christmas Shopping Nightmares, prepare for disappointment. If you came looking for another consumer grievance against a soul-less corporate greedmonger, this is not your day. If you were hoping to commiserate with other aggrieved customers to collectively shake an angry fist at the insensitive doofus who owns the neighborhood service company, well, you're out of luck. The specialty here is usually a heaping order of outrage on a plate, but today we're going to do something different - say some nice things about companies.
FEATURES
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2004
By 8 o'clock on a recent night, the streets of Baltimore were virtually deserted as wind gusts of 32 mph drove temperatures into the teens and people inside. Patrick Rhodes and Melissa Faith Coleman were two exceptions. They spent part of the night roaming the streets of Baltimore, seeking out homeless people who might be in need of a sleeping bag. They found one man just off of Fleet Street near Eaton Street. He was seeking sanctuary from the biting Arctic air behind two pea-green utility boxes.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
Phil Pietrolungo wouldn't mind a single 24-hour shift right about now. Fueled by Pepsi and Marlboro Mediums, the Baltimore County public works driver has been plowing snow since Friday night. He's gotten about eight hours' sleep in that time, most of it in the front seat of his truck. And he probably won't get to his house in Parkville until tomorrow at the earliest. For a plow operator during the worst area snowstorm in 81 years, life has become a blur of white mounds, gray slush and caffeine jolts.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2002
There's nothing more tiresome than seeing yet another TV sports highlight clip of a poor fan snoring away during a baseball game. Well, hold the jokes about the national pastime putting people to sleep. This weekend, the ballpark has become a perfectly acceptable field of dreams. Two hundred fifty fans attending last night's game between the White Sox and Montreal Expos at Chicago's Comiskey Park got to sleep over. Right on the field. They got to camp out in the very spot where Magglio Ordonez camps out under fly balls.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff | December 20, 1998
Better sleeping arrangementsWhen Cathy Williams designed a more comfortable sleeping bag for her daughter Katie, she didn't realize she also was creating a company.But 18 months later, the Rodgers Forge mother has a mail-order business featuring fleece hats, scarves, reversible baby buntings, blankets, pillowcases - and of course sleeping bags - that has been touted in Parents and American Girl magazines.Necessity played a big part in her first invention. Katie, then 8, often complained about her slumber bag being bulky and difficult to zip. Two months and eight tries later, Williams came up with a fleece version that fastened shut.
FEATURES
By Lisa Skolnik and Lisa Skolnik,Chicago Tribune | July 30, 1998
Bored with your bedtime routine? You know the drill: You go to sleep in the same room, same bed and same PJs at the same time night after night.Now that it's warm outside, shake up the routine and go backyard camping all alone (we mean no parents; buds are a must). We recently had a few thrills, a few chills and best of all, lots of frills on our own backyard campout. Seven kids slept in the backyard on a balmy June night. Here's the low-down:The thrills: The fresh air was excellent, the extra company was outstanding and it was a blast to tell scary stories, stay up late and act silly.
FEATURES
By Lisa Skolnik and Lisa Skolnik,Chicago Tribune | July 30, 1998
Bored with your bedtime routine? You know the drill: You go to sleep in the same room, same bed and same PJs at the same time night after night.Now that it's warm outside, shake up the routine and go backyard camping all alone (we mean no parents; buds are a must). We recently had a few thrills, a few chills and best of all, lots of frills on our own backyard campout. Seven kids slept in the backyard on a balmy June night. Here's the low-down:The thrills: The fresh air was excellent, the extra company was outstanding and it was a blast to tell scary stories, stay up late and act silly.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | August 22, 1995
$TC Beware the mail.Hello! This is a reminder of the Family Sleepover at the National Aquarium in Baltimore on Saturday, August 19. We will be sleeping in the underwater viewing area. You will need to bring: a sleeping bag, personal articles to include a toothbrush and sleepwear that is suitable for our coed group!Dads, stow your briefs. We meet at 6:30 p.m. at the outdoor seal pool. "Hi. You must be here for the sleep-over," says Bruce Barbarasch, tonight's co-leader. You are correct, Mr. Bruce Barbarasch.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 6, 1998
WITH THEIR trucks loaded with chain saws, tools and sleeping bags, 24 members of Grace Lutheran Church in Westminster took off on a 30-hour drive Thursday to Selby, S.D., to help a rural community rebuild after a winter storm.Only about 700 people live in Selby -- ranchers mostly, who let their cattle roam and find shelter in tree berms rather than barns. When a winter storm hit the area more than a year ago, the trees were wiped out, the snow covered the cattle and many froze."The community was devastated, and when someone loses their livelihood, it hits the church," said Mel Arbaugh, one of Grace Lutheran's volunteers who left last week.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 13, 1997
AS I TYPE THIS, I find myself in the advanced stages of sleep deprivation after a weekend stay with an old college roommate.On the first night, Matt's wife uttered the five most frightening words in the English language: "You take the pull-out couch."As usual, the bed had the same thin, lumpy mattress they give to heroin traffickers in Malaysian jails.It also featured the standard-issue metal bar that jabs viciously into your back no matter what position you try to sleep in.Finally, there was this interesting touch: Both legs at the bottom of the frame were bent, causing the bed to list downward at a 30-degree angle.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.