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Sleep Deprivation

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NEWS
By Marilyn Geewax | February 10, 1998
ATLANTA -- At the start of this century, Northern manufacturers who opened factories in the rural South discovered that to get production shifts started, they first had to teach new workers to arrive on time. The former sharecroppers didn't own watches and had timed their lives only by the rising and setting of the sun.To solve the problem, the boss would install a large clock in the town center and put a loud whistle on the factory roof to remind employees when to wake up.Today, employees have their own alarm clocks to rouse themselves in the dark.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. McDaniels and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Busy lives, smartphones and poor sleep habits are all contributing to groggy children suffering from the same sleep disorders as adults. But Dr. Laura Sterni, director of the Johns Hopkins Pediatric Sleep Center at Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital, said treating sleep ailments in children takes a different approach form that used for adults. How common is it for children to suffer from sleep disorders, and what kinds of sleep disorders do children suffer from? Sleep disorders are very common in children.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 7, 1999
JERUSALEM -- Israel's Supreme Court has banned the use of sleep deprivation, violent shaking and other "physical pressure" in interrogations, a historic ruling that outlaws the decades-long treatment of Palestinian suspects by the security police in their fight against terrorism.While acknowledging Israel's "unceasing struggle for both its very existence and security," the nine-judge panel ruled yesterday that state investigators cannot use any means available to interrogate a suspected terrorist -- even if the suspect knows where a bomb is.Interrogation methods must be reasonable, if not always painless, the court said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
With all of the beeping of machines and checking of vital signs, patients in the intensive-care unit often have trouble sleeping. This, along with other hospital conditions, like lack of natural light and familiar surroundings, can lead to disorientation. It's called ICU psychosis, and while it's unsettling to patients and their families, it's not likely to last all that long, according to Dr. Chaitanya Ravi, director of LifeBridge Health Hospitalist Services. What is ICU psychosis and what are the main symptoms of it?
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | July 29, 1993
Half of Americans suffer bouts of insomnia or chronic sleep loss that could endanger their health, a panel of leading sleep disorder experts cautioned yesterday.Although many sleep-deprived Americans acknowledge feelings of irritability, apathy and lethargy, few realize that failing to catch enough shut-eye can lead to long-term health problems, some of which can be fatal."Sleep disorders and chronic sleep deprivation are America's worst, largest and costliest invisible [medical] problem," Dr. William Dement, director of the Sleep Disorders Center at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif.
NEWS
May 22, 2009
Residents' sleep deprivation a danger True, spending money so docs in training can sleep seems exorbitant, but people outside medicine do not understand the toll sleep deprivation takes on health providers and patients. Most doctors in training toil in inner city hospitals and take care of the poor, who are far sicker than other patients when they arrive in hospitals. Decisions have to be made fast and procedures done quickly to save lives. Calm doctors with alert minds and steady hands make the difference between life and death for severely ill patients.
NEWS
July 6, 2014
Thank you, Ed Slattery, for continuing to fight for truck safety for those who might suffer from a trucker- caused accident and for the truckers themselves ( "Keep tired truckers off the road," June 29). It is hard to believe that anyone would put forward a suggestion that more hours could be added to driving given our current knowledge about the negative effects of disrupting normal sleep cycles and of sleep deprivation on the functioning of the brain, especially judgment. Judith Maisey - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff | March 21, 2000
Just how long can Joseph C. Palczynski keep going? The answer, according to some doctors, may be several more days. People can function for extended periods if sleep-deprived, experts say, though they are likely to become more irritable and suspicious. But for someone suffering from bipolar disorder, going days with virtually no sleep can have disastrous consequences. Since the standoff in Dundalk began Friday night, Baltimore County police believe Palczynski has kept going with only occasional naps.
NEWS
April 27, 2009
'Coercion' is just totalitarian torture Richard Saccone pooh-poohs all this needless talk about "torture" ("Confusing coercion with torture," Commentary, April 22). He speaks dismissively of water-boarding and of keeping "a terrorist awake 15 minutes past his bedtime." Mr. Saccone is either intentionally reading the torture memos selectively or confused about the difference between democracy and totalitarianism. Consider the following chilling parallels. In Stalinist Russia, sleep deprivation was regularly deployed against political prisoners.
EXPLORE
May 8, 2013
The HCPSS board is researching the feasibility of later high school start times. This could have a great impact on many students around the county and I fully back this proposal. As a high school student, I can visibly see the effects of sleep deprivation on students. I am looking for an increase in support from the school board. Specifically, I would like to see the school board push high school start times to later than the current start time of 7:20 a.m. In studies done by the National Sleep Foundation, National Department of Transportation and Center Disease Control and Prevention, they found that only 31 percent of high school students reported getting a sufficient eight hours of sleep.
NEWS
July 6, 2014
Thank you, Ed Slattery, for continuing to fight for truck safety for those who might suffer from a trucker- caused accident and for the truckers themselves ( "Keep tired truckers off the road," June 29). It is hard to believe that anyone would put forward a suggestion that more hours could be added to driving given our current knowledge about the negative effects of disrupting normal sleep cycles and of sleep deprivation on the functioning of the brain, especially judgment. Judith Maisey - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
June 9, 2014
The horrific traffic crash last Saturday at 1 a.m. on the New Jersey Turnpike that killed one person and left comedian Tracy Morgan in critical condition at a hospital near Trenton calls attention to the danger of tired truck drivers. Investigators suspect the driver of a Walmart tractor-trailer had dozed off when he slammed into the back of the comedian's limousine bus which was returning to New York from a show in Dover, Del. The exact circumstances are not entirely clear, and police have stressed that the incident remains under investigation.
EXPLORE
May 8, 2013
The HCPSS board is researching the feasibility of later high school start times. This could have a great impact on many students around the county and I fully back this proposal. As a high school student, I can visibly see the effects of sleep deprivation on students. I am looking for an increase in support from the school board. Specifically, I would like to see the school board push high school start times to later than the current start time of 7:20 a.m. In studies done by the National Sleep Foundation, National Department of Transportation and Center Disease Control and Prevention, they found that only 31 percent of high school students reported getting a sufficient eight hours of sleep.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
You think sports fans are superstitious? That baseball players have the corner on game-day rituals? I say they've got nothing on parents whose baby just slept through the night for the first time in weeks. After a couple of months of being solidly spoiled by several hours in a row of glorious sleep thanks to a sleeping baby, my husband and I were completely thrashed when he suddenly stopped sleeping more than a handful of hours at a stretch. And this continued for days and days, probably months if we calculated it (which trust me, we don't want to do)
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
On the first full day of his life as the most-decorated Olympian, Michael Phelps went back to work - those medals don't start winning themselves just because you've hit 19, after all. But first he had to attend to his correspondence. "Thank you Mr. President!!" he wrote, re-tweeting a congratulatory message from @BarackObama. "It's an honor representing the #USA !! The best country in the world!!" A little less formally, there was a "Thanks bro!!!" to a tweet from Lil Wayne ("High praises to my good friend Michael Phelps for becoming the greatest Olympian of all time.USA!
EXPLORE
By Cathy Drinkwater Better | December 27, 2011
All the presents have been opened; wrapping paper is strewn all over the house. The dog is wearing a large shiny bow, courtesy of the kids; while the cat has one end of a piece of curling ribbon hanging out of her mouth and the other end hanging out her … elsewhere. The joyful voices of happy children emanate from the next room. They're arguing over whose turn it is to play the new video game or hollering, "Quit it! Give me back my new (fill in the blank) or I'm gonna tell!" Good times.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. McDaniels and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Busy lives, smartphones and poor sleep habits are all contributing to groggy children suffering from the same sleep disorders as adults. But Dr. Laura Sterni, director of the Johns Hopkins Pediatric Sleep Center at Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital, said treating sleep ailments in children takes a different approach form that used for adults. How common is it for children to suffer from sleep disorders, and what kinds of sleep disorders do children suffer from? Sleep disorders are very common in children.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 4, 2003
SILVER SPRING - Army Col. Gregory Belenky pops a stick of "Stay Alert" gum and chomps it for an hour, ignoring the label on the camouflage wrapper that warns him not to chew the super-caffeinated military product for more than five minutes. What do you expect from the Army's chief sleep deprivation expert? He's tired. Since the war with Iraq began, the fatigue questions have kept this military psychiatrist's phone ringing at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. Among the callers: the Army surgeon general's office, which recently requested several cases of "Stay Alert" - a sickly sweet gum that works like a giant coffee, only much faster.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 12, 2011
In an era of high unemployment - and with many of the gainfully employed working too many hours because companies are either still downsizing or avoiding new hires - it would be helpful if the Maryland Court of Appeals allowed this question to be decided by a jury: Should an employer be held responsible when an overworked, sleep-deprived employee causes a terrible accident? That's the question at the center of a lawsuit that has been grinding through the state courts for a few years.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2011
When is it OK to catch some shut-eye on the job? Workplace snoozing has been the topic of an awful lot of water-cooler jesting lately — at least among those awake enough to remember their conversations. First, there were a rash of reported incidents of air-traffic controllers nodding off during late-night shifts, though no serious accidents occurred. Then, Vice President Joe Biden became a target of nationwide fun after he nodded off during his boss' noontime budget speech. The notion of napping on your employer's dime seems to violate every aspect of the work ethic instilled in Americans from the nation's earliest days.
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