Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSleep Apnea
IN THE NEWS

Sleep Apnea

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Offensive lineman Ryan Jensen hadn't felt like his normal self for a long time. He was visibly groggy from a lack of sleep. He was more irritable than usual. And he didn't feel as energetic as he needed to be on the Ravens' practice field. It turned out there was a reason why. Jensen recently was diagnosed with and treated for severe sleep apnea, a life-threatening disorder when left untreated. It also might have played a role in Jensen's being cut by the Ravens on Saturday after a preseason performance the 2013 sixth-round draft pick from Colorado State-Pueblo wasn't pleased with.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Andrea K. McDaniels and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Busy lives, smartphones and poor sleep habits are all contributing to groggy children suffering from the same sleep disorders as adults. But Dr. Laura Sterni, director of the Johns Hopkins Pediatric Sleep Center at Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital, said treating sleep ailments in children takes a different approach form that used for adults. How common is it for children to suffer from sleep disorders, and what kinds of sleep disorders do children suffer from? Sleep disorders are very common in children.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | October 18, 1994
At first, he excused his fatigue as a symptom of advancing age, expanding girth or the rigors of his grinding schedule.There were nights when Del. Howard "Pete" Rawlings struggled to stay awake during the tedious drive home from Annapolis. Or the time the Baltimore Democrat drifted off while dining with friends at an elegant restaurant in Manhattan."He just nodded off," said his wife, Dr. Nina Rawlings, a pediatrician who implored him without success to see a doctor. "I was just glad I was sitting next to him. I kept bumping his knee."
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Offensive lineman Ryan Jensen hadn't felt like his normal self for a long time. He was visibly groggy from a lack of sleep. He was more irritable than usual. And he didn't feel as energetic as he needed to be on the Ravens' practice field. It turned out there was a reason why. Jensen recently was diagnosed with and treated for severe sleep apnea, a life-threatening disorder when left untreated. It also might have played a role in Jensen's being cut by the Ravens on Saturday after a preseason performance the 2013 sixth-round draft pick from Colorado State-Pueblo wasn't pleased with.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
Sleep apnea, the breathing disorder that affects millions of Americans with loud snoring and fatigue, also puts them at risk for high blood pressure. According to a new, national study, people with sleep apnea were more than twice as likely to suffer from hypertension than those who didn't stop breathing. Even at moderate levels of sleep apnea, researchers detected a risk of hypertension. And as the severity of sleep apnea increased, so did the prevalence of high blood pressure. Scientists have suspected for at least 20 years that sleep apnea was linked with hypertension, and some smaller studies have made indirect connections.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | May 12, 2006
The only real health problem that 3-year-old Nicholas Salter had was the occasional sore throat. Sometimes, it hurt so much that it was hard to swallow, which cut back on his appetite. And there was one more issue: "He'd snore so loudly you could hear him in his room from the top of the steps," said his mother, Jackie Salter. After two cases of strep throat within a few weeks, doctors recommended a sleep study: hooking Nicholas up to monitors overnight to make sure he was breathing properly and getting enough rest.
FEATURES
March 14, 1995
Looking for information about health and fitness topics? You might find what you're looking for in stories from Sun on Demand.Each story, which has appeared in The Baltimore Sun, is $2.95 plus tax. Call (410) 332-6800. Ask for the article by its code.Alternative medicine, 6301Alzheimer's, 6309Breast cancer amongAfrican-Americans, 6316Ear infections, 6307Incontinence, 6304Menopause, 6303Prostate health, 6313Sleep apnea, 6312
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | August 18, 2009
Severe nightly episodes of interrupted breathing during sleep - commonly known as sleep apnea - double the risk of death for middle-age men, according to a new study being called the largest ever conducted on the disorder. Even men with moderate sleep apnea - anywhere from 15 to 30 instances of oxygen deprivation per hour - appear to be 45 percent more likely to die from any cause than those who have no nighttime breathing problems. As many as one in four men is believed to suffer from sleep apnea, researchers said, and many with less severe apnea may not even know they have it, even though it can dangerously decrease the oxygen in their bloodstream.
NEWS
April 20, 2005
Official extends television challenge for Md. students Sen. Sandra B. Schrader has issued a "TV-Free 10 Day Challenge" to elementary school pupils. The challenge is being held in conjunction with the National TV-Turnoff Week, which runs from Monday through May 1. Those who successfully complete the challenge will be honored at a June reception with a personalized senatorial citation. Information: 410-841-3572. Charter school meeting open to interested parents The Columbia Public Charter School is holding a meeting at 7 p.m. Friday for parents interested in more information about the proposed school.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. McDaniels and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Busy lives, smartphones and poor sleep habits are all contributing to groggy children suffering from the same sleep disorders as adults. But Dr. Laura Sterni, director of the Johns Hopkins Pediatric Sleep Center at Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital, said treating sleep ailments in children takes a different approach form that used for adults. How common is it for children to suffer from sleep disorders, and what kinds of sleep disorders do children suffer from? Sleep disorders are very common in children.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Former NFL quarterback Scott Mitchell, who started a pair of games for the Ravens in 1999 and had a 12-year NFL career, will be featured on NBC's “The Biggest Loser,” a show in which people try to lose weight under the supervision of personal trainers. Mitchell currently weighs 366 pounds , but his NFL.com profile lists him at 240 pounds at the end of his playing career in 2001. He's currently listed as a bill collector, and according to the show's website, wants to get healthy for his family.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Lying awake at night staring at the ceiling is never fun. But we all experience this insomnia at some points in our lives. When sleeplessness becomes chronic, it can cause other health and lifestyle problems. Dr. Audrey Liu, a sleep specialist at Mercy Medical Center, talks about how to treat insomnia. What are the different symptoms of insomnia? Nighttime symptoms of insomnia include difficulty falling asleep, recurrent awakenings throughout the night and early awakenings.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2011
Dr. Lewis B. Newberg, a retired ear, nose and throat specialist who turned his personal battle with sleep apnea and snoring into a book in which he combined humor and practical medical advice for those similarly afflicted, died Oct. 22 of heart failure at his Edgewater home. He was 72. The son of a businessman and a homemaker, Dr. Newberg was born in the Bronx, N.Y., and raised in Jamaica, N.Y., where he was a graduate of public schools. After earning a bachelor's degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, he earned his medical degree in 1964 from the Chicago Medical School.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 28, 2011
Dr. Lewis B. Newberg, a retired ear, nose and throat specialist who turned his personal battle with sleep apnea and snoring into a book in which he combined humor and practical medical advice for those similarly afflicted, died Oct. 22 of heart failure at his Edgewater home. He was 72. The son of a businessman and a homemaker, Dr. Newberg was born in the Bronx, N.Y., and raised in Jamaica, N.Y., where he was a graduate of public schools. After earning a bachelor's degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, he earned his medical degree in 1964 from the old Chicago Medical School.
EXPLORE
June 22, 2011
Symptoms of sleep apnea: Excessive daytime sleeping Loud snoring Gasping or choking awakening Awakenings for uncertain reasons Restless sleep Nonrefreshing sleep Poor memory Poor intellectual function irritability Personality changes Morningheadaches Confusion Grinding teeth at night
NEWS
August 31, 2009
Good and adequate amounts of sleep are essential for the growth and development of children. Sleep problems vary with age. For example, younger children may suffer from snoring and sleep apnea. Sleep terrors and sleepwalking also are common. For teens, sleepiness is commonly caused by inadequate sleep from later bedtimes combined with early start times of typical high schools. Dr. Robert Meny, a pediatric sleep specialist at the St. Joseph Medical Center Sleep Disorders Center, explains the most common sleep problems for children, how parents can cope and when to seek professional help.
SPORTS
By Michael Hirsley and Michael Hirsley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 28, 2004
CHICAGO - Reggie White probably died of a mysterious inflammatory disease of unknown origin that can strike any organ in the body, exist without detection and disappear without treatment in many cases, according to a preliminary autopsy report. Sarcoidosis in White's lungs and heart was the likely trigger that "resulted in a fatal cardiac arrhythmia," Dr. Mike Sullivan, medical examiner of Mecklenburg County, N.C., said yesterday. "Sleep apnea may have been a contributing factor." Sullivan's is the jurisdiction where White died at 7:51 a.m. Sunday after being taken from his home in Cornelius, N.C., to Presbyterian Hospital in Huntersville, N.C. He was 43. Though sarcoidosis is lethal in only 5 percent of cases and is reported in only one of every 2,500 U.S. residents, its insidious nature apparently has been revealed again in White's case.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
The attractions of professional football are apparent to anyone with the ability to reach that level, and for many others who don't. The modern player can count on glory and healthy salaries from his work. That has always made the risks of playing seem worth taking. "For 90 percent, they would say they would do it again," said Kevin Guskiewicz, research director of the Center for the Study of Retired Athletes at the University of North Carolina. "Fame, money. It was important to them, and it outweighs the complications that result later in life."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | August 18, 2009
Severe nightly episodes of interrupted breathing during sleep - commonly known as sleep apnea - double the risk of death for middle-age men, according to a new study being called the largest ever conducted on the disorder. Even men with moderate sleep apnea - anywhere from 15 to 30 instances of oxygen deprivation per hour - appear to be 45 percent more likely to die from any cause than those who have no nighttime breathing problems. As many as one in four men is believed to suffer from sleep apnea, researchers said, and many with less severe apnea may not even know they have it, even though it can dangerously decrease the oxygen in their bloodstream.
FEATURES
August 7, 2008
Drugs Pill given to mice delivers benefits of daily exercise Scientists have discovered what could be the ultimate workout for couch potatoes: exercise in a pill. In experiments on mice that did no exercise, the chemical compound, known as AICAR, enabled them to run 44 percent farther on a treadmill than those that did not receive the drug. The drug, according to the researchers, changed the physical composition of muscle, essentially transforming the tissue from sugar-burning fast-twitch fibers to fat-burning slow-twitch ones - the same change that occurs in distance runners and cyclists through training.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.