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NEWS
August 24, 2005
FEELING BLEARY this morning? Up too late or too early? Medical science has now got a drug for you. Wake Forest University researchers recently reported that they've found a compound that temporarily restores normal cognitive functioning and short-term memory in the sleep-deprived, at least in tested monkeys. Human tests are under way. No, the chemical, labeled CX717, isn't coffee, which offers the potential for overstimulation and addiction. This new drug apparently improves the functioning of certain chemical receptors in certain parts of the brain without arousing the whole brain.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. McDaniels and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Busy lives, smartphones and poor sleep habits are all contributing to groggy children suffering from the same sleep disorders as adults. But Dr. Laura Sterni, director of the Johns Hopkins Pediatric Sleep Center at Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital, said treating sleep ailments in children takes a different approach form that used for adults. How common is it for children to suffer from sleep disorders, and what kinds of sleep disorders do children suffer from? Sleep disorders are very common in children.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 14, 2012
The National Institutes of Health is expanding its safe infant sleep outreach campaign to include ways to reduce not only sudden infant death syndrome but all causes of infant death. The “Back to Sleep” campaign was launched in 1994 to encourage parents to put babies to sleep on their back to reduce the risk of SIDS, or unexplained death of an infant under a year old. The campaign has been adopted widely, with Maryland and Baltimore City aggressively educating parents.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Offensive lineman Ryan Jensen hadn't felt like his normal self for a long time. He was visibly groggy from a lack of sleep. He was more irritable than usual. And he didn't feel as energetic as he needed to be on the Ravens' practice field. It turned out there was a reason why. Jensen recently was diagnosed with and treated for severe sleep apnea, a life-threatening disorder when left untreated. It also might have played a role in Jensen's being cut by the Ravens on Saturday after a preseason performance the 2013 sixth-round draft pick from Colorado State-Pueblo wasn't pleased with.
NEWS
January 22, 2008
In addition to all the reasons that being overweight is not good for you, there is evidence that it prevents you from sleeping well. Even worse, researchers warn of a vicious cycle of eating more when you are sleep-deprived. If more motivation were needed to make that New Year's resolution to shed those extra pounds, the prospect of not sleeping and gaining more weight should do it. The dangers of obesity are well known and can't be emphasized enough. There's the increased risk of diabetes, hypertension and heart problems that can lead to a poor quality of life and, at worst, a reduced life span.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | November 13, 2012
While health professionals encourage people to get from seven to eight hours of sleep nightly, millions of Americans are falling well short of that mark. Many are getting just five to six hours and recent studies have shown that more than 20 percent of the population may be suffering from some type of sleep disorder. St. Agnes Hospital now has a renovated and expanded facility dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders. The St. Agnes Sleep Center is open to adults and children as young as 3 years old. The patients are usually referred to the facility by their primary care doctor or cardiologist.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry
The Baltimore Sun
| March 3, 2014
A new study in the journal Pediatrics found that some white-noise machines that are used for helping babies fall asleep and stay asleep are so loud they could potentially harm babies' ears. The study didn't show evidence of any baby's hearing that had been damaged by the machines, but did research the machines' decibel levels and found that some could be turned up to a degree loud enough to damage infants' ears. No studies so far on the damage to parents' ears from screaming babies, but still, play it safe and don't turn those sleep machines all the way up to 11. For more on the study, click here .  
FEATURES
By Beverly Mills | September 24, 1995
Q: My 4 1/2 -year-old daughter talks in her sleep, sitting up in bed with her eyes open. At first we thought she was awake. This can go on for five minutes, and sometimes she gets pretty agitated. Last night she got up and started walking around. Isthis normal?-- Julie Gibbs, Chicago, Ill.A: Lots of children carry on conversations in their sleep, say parents who called Child Life."My daughter did this until she was a senior in high school," says Anne Normal, a reader from Panhandle, Texas.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | June 30, 1991
A. M. Chaplin says that she demonstrated true reportoria involvement in this week's cover story on sleep. She got a two-week-long attack of insomnia while she was doing it, during which she felt, as every insomniac does, godawful. "I consoled myself," she says, "with deeply resentful thoughts about certain individuals who have the bad taste to sleep soundly while their spouses toss and turn miserably for hours."A. M. takes some small pleasure in pointing out the rotten sleep habits of sleep researchers.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | November 10, 1992
I am standing in the linen department of a large department store. There's a sale in progress. I am lovingly fingering the printed sheets with bright tulips. I move along to the Ralph Lauren designer sheets -- oooh, these are striking. Then I -- over to Calvin Klein and hug the gorgeous pillow cases. Ah, to be able to spend a night on any of these great designs.I love colorful sheets -- probably because he hates them so much. Besides, they didn't have printed sheets with all the neat colors when I was growing up.But he has a disease that I call Printed Sheet Shock Syndrome.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
With all of the beeping of machines and checking of vital signs, patients in the intensive-care unit often have trouble sleeping. This, along with other hospital conditions, like lack of natural light and familiar surroundings, can lead to disorientation. It's called ICU psychosis, and while it's unsettling to patients and their families, it's not likely to last all that long, according to Dr. Chaitanya Ravi, director of LifeBridge Health Hospitalist Services. What is ICU psychosis and what are the main symptoms of it?
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
A gun shot fired during a chase whizzed several hundred feet through the Glen Burnie air Friday night police said, before lodging in a wall just four feet above a sleeping five year old. Anne Arundel County police said the incident started just before 10 p.m. when a 27-year-old man was approached by an armed man in the 7900 block of Gentle Breeze Court. The victim ran away and was chased by the gunman, who fired multiple shots, police said. One of the bullets flew across the street and went through the front window of a home in the 400 block of Secluded Post Circle, police said, only coming to rest when it struck a wall above where the young child was sleeping.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Earlier today, before I turned her off in mid-sentence, a pleasant woman on the radio who was trying not to sound bigoted was saying that immigrants in her family from Norway and Poland and elsewhere didn't arrive in this country expecting everyone to be able to speak Norwegian or Polish ...  Robert Lane Grreen, writing in The Economist 's Johnson  blog , points out, " In the traditional story, immigrants back in the good...
SPORTS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
A freshman Maryland men's lacrosse player was arrested and charged with sexually assaulting a sleeping woman at a Zac Brown Band concert in Virginia on Sunday, police said. Benjamin Chisolm, 19, of Davidsonville, is accused of molesting a 49-year-old woman who had fallen asleep in the lawn area during the concert at Jiffy Lube Live pavilion in Bristow, Va. The woman told police she awoke around 8:30 p.m. to find an unknown man, later identified as Chisolm, lying beside her and touching her inappropriately.
NEWS
June 9, 2014
The horrific traffic crash last Saturday at 1 a.m. on the New Jersey Turnpike that killed one person and left comedian Tracy Morgan in critical condition at a hospital near Trenton calls attention to the danger of tired truck drivers. Investigators suspect the driver of a Walmart tractor-trailer had dozed off when he slammed into the back of the comedian's limousine bus which was returning to New York from a show in Dover, Del. The exact circumstances are not entirely clear, and police have stressed that the incident remains under investigation.
SPORTS
By Trevor Hass and The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
Western Tech's Carrington Akosa's sleep schedule is far from that of a normal high school student. He goes to bed at 7 p.m. every school night and wakes up between 2 and 3 a.m. to do his homework.  “It's like clockwork,” Western Tech coach Shedrick Elliott said. But sleep is not the only thing that makes Akosa the runner he has become. His sleep schedule, coupled with his exceptional work ethic and most of all his scorching speed, served him well on Saturday at the track and field championships at Morgan State.
NEWS
By KAROL V. MENZIE and KAROL V. MENZIE,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2000
Sleeping. We spend a third of our lives doing it, and yet we have to learn how, and some of us still have trouble with it after many years. Some sleep scientists believe most of us are getting 6 hours of sleep a night, when we actually need 8 or 10. Sleep experts say the key to getting to sleep is to have a routine, a set of behaviors practiced faithfully every night to "wind you down" and lead you into dreamland. Some suggested activities are stretching exercises to relax tension, drinking hot caffeine-free tea, or luxuriating in a warm bath.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When Baltimore writer Rafael Alvarez was driving around the country peddling his books, he sold a collection of his newspaper articles and short stories to a drunken farmer in a men's room outside Memphis, Tenn. He's spent countless nights sleeping in his truck. He's traded a book for a meal. A good day is when he ekes out just enough money to buy enough gas to get him to the next town - and that's assuming he doesn't run into an ice storm. So what would Alvarez consider to be a not-so-good day on the road?
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Watching your back can get tiring. Just ask Lindell Session.  Session, 26, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court this week to possession of a firearm by a felon, after authorities say he was found snoozing in the driver's seat of his car - clutching a loaded .38 Special.  A city police sergeant was on patrol on Nov. 2, 2013 at 9:50 a.m. when a citizen flagged him down in the 2400 block of E. North Ave. and told him there was a man sleeping in...
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