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By ROB KASPER | February 13, 1993
It was more akin to a dusting than a blizzard, but during the few hours last weekend that flakes fell, it felt like winter.As soon as our car pulled away from a freshly completed basketball game, my 7-year-old son spotted sledders on the hill in front of the Baltimore County Board of Education on North Charles Street.To my eye the snow on this hill looked patchy and uncertain. I could see grass poking through it.But to the eye of a 7-year-old who had not been sledding all winter, this hill looked slick and inviting.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
Ravens running back Bernard Pierce kept plunging into the line of scrimmage Sunday, collidng with a stingy Houston Texans defensive front that repeatedly stonewalled him. Rushing yards became a rare commodity for Pierce despite his efforts. Making his first NFL start with injured Pro Bowl runner Ray Rice sidelined with a strained left hip flexor, Pierce salvaged a tough day by grinding out the majority of his 65 yards on 24 carries during the second half of a 30-9 victory at M&T Bank Stadium.
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NEWS
By Richard Irwin | January 27, 1992
State Police said two motorists died in traffic accidents over the weekend on snow-covered roads and an 11-year-old Silver Spring boy was killed when he rode his plastic sled down a hill and under a moving car.Two other children were injured in sledding incidents, police said.State Police at Pikesville said the fatalities brought to 32 the number of people killed on Maryland roads so far this year, compared with 43 at the same time last year.About 12:45 a.m. yesterday, John Joseph Redmond, 43, of Shore Road in Edgemere, was driving a 1966 Oldsmobile Cutlass east on Peninsula Expressway near Merritt Boulevard when the car skidded on the slippery surface and rode up onto a concrete median strip, Baltimore County police said.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2012
Facing a cupboard bare of medals and reeling from scandals, the once-proud U.S. bobsled and skeleton program was at rock bottom the year of the 2006 Winter Olympics. The helping hands that reached out to restore stability and glory came from an unusual place, one that knows heat and humidity better than snow and ice: Baltimore. Under Armour, the sports apparel company based in Baltimore, provided sponsorship dollars and put its logo on athletes' clothing and equipment in a deal that lasts through the 2014 Winter Games, part of the company's effort to expand beyond its base in traditional U.S. sports such as football and baseball and into overseas and niche markets.
TRAVEL
By Jon Secrest and By Jon Secrest,Special to the Sun | January 26, 2003
Although I had anticipated that it would happen, it was still with some surprise that I found myself being dragged in the snow behind eight powerful, excited Siberian huskies, one desperate hand on the sled handle and legs flailing behind me in what our guide good-naturedly referred to as "an Indiana Jones." I managed to pull myself back on the sled and bring it to a halt. As I waited for my wife, Kerry, to limp her way over because she had been knocked off the sled halfway down the hill, I found myself breathing heavily, surrounded by a stunning, snowy landscape.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | December 18, 2005
Lake Placid, N.Y. -- Villains in American sport date back at least 100 years when scoundrels such as Ty Cobb roamed the basepaths as though hunting season had just begun. Later, we had the Raiders, the Pistons, the hockey goon and just about any Soviet athlete during the Cold War. s blog at baltimoresun.com/maeseblog Point after -- Rick Maese The luge looks like a lot of fun, doesn't it? It's like when you were younger and you went down a twisty slide at the park. Only this slide is made of ice. And it's highly probable that you'll suffer permanent injury.
NEWS
By Stanley C. Dillon | January 20, 1991
Gavin Bullock of Westminster says he has "the need for speed," whichis why the 27-year-old always is looking for places to race his snowmobiles.No matter what the season is, Bullock and his friend MikeWolfe -- who is also his crew chief, team owner and sponsor -- are racing their snowmobiles almost every weekend.Last fall, Bullock competed in the Mason-Dixon Grass Drags at theKingsdale, Pa., Fire Co.He won the first race of the series in October, topping 13 sleds in the Formula III class.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 11, 1995
In the tiny Midwestern town where my wife grew up, when folks needed something fixed they went to see the men at the lumberyard. The lumberyard guys knew how to set things right.I used to laugh at such a provincial view of problem-solving. Now I live in Baltimore, a place that, when the whole schmear including the Washington area and suburbs are counted, ranks as the fourth largest urban area in America.However, the longer I live in this big city clime, the more I find myself behaving like I live in a small town.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
A report by the International Luge Federation has concluded that a series of events, including driver error, caused the crash that killed Republic of Georgia athlete Nodar Kumaritashvili just hours before the start of the Winter Olympics. Sandwiched between a glowing introductory tribute to Kumaritashvili and an attempt by the federation to repair its image in the final pages is a re-creation of the athlete's final moments and the safety measures taken before and after the crash.
NEWS
By HANNELIESE PENNER | February 28, 1992
Last week as I was watching the Olympic bobsledding with my grandchildren I had a memory flashback and said quietly: ''I had a bobsled!''''You did?'' was their incredulous response, and I hastened to add: ''Yes, but not one as sleek as they have now.''I grew up in Hamburg, Germany, where the climate is very much like Baltimore's, with very little snow during the winter. When it falls, slopes and hills turn into playgrounds for children and their sleds.My grandmother was a statuesque woman, resolute, wise and my childhood companion.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
In the aftermath of the season's first major storm, Baltimore-area residents struggled to clear sidewalks, driveways and cars of the wet, heavy snow. "It's just back-breaking, but you got to do what you got to do. At least it's not as bad as last year," said Steve DiCarlo, who was shoveling the sidewalk in his neighborhood along Reisterstown Road on Thursday as his three excited puppies watched. Arnie Sagal had tried to get ahead of the game — beginning his dig at 1 a.m. Thursday to make it to work at the Giant supermarket in Owings Mills' New Town Village by 4 a.m. Still, his four hours of work was no match for the daunting piles of snow and stranded cars that still lined his neighborhood around 9 a.m. As the sound of tires screeching and the smell of burning rubber began to fill the air, Sagal abandoned h's hope to make it to work.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
A report by the International Luge Federation has concluded that a series of events, including driver error, caused the crash that killed Republic of Georgia athlete Nodar Kumaritashvili just hours before the start of the Winter Olympics. Sandwiched between a glowing introductory tribute to Kumaritashvili and an attempt by the federation to repair its image in the final pages is a re-creation of the athlete's final moments and the safety measures taken before and after the crash.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | candus.thomson@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 12, 2010
Just hours before the caldron was lighted to mark the start of these Winter Olympics, a young athlete's life was snuffed out in a horrific crash on the world's fastest luge track. On a morning training run under the first blue sky in days, Nodar Kumaritashvili, 21, of the Republic of Georgia lost control of his sled at about 80 mph as he came out of the final curve--nicknamed Thunderbird--and approached the finish line. He was catapulted over the outer lip of the track and slammed into an unpadded roof support post.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | February 5, 2010
Two years ago, Russian bobsled federation officials approached the designer of one of the world's fastest bobsleds and offered him "money, women, money and women" to transfer his loyalties - and secrets - from the U.S. team. "I told them, 'It's not going to happen. This stuff isn't for sale,' " says Bob Cuneo, retelling the story while leaning on a bar and laughing. Now 18 years after he partnered with former NASCAR driver Geoff Bodine to produce a world-class winter racing machine, Cuneo hopes the four-man competition will end with the perfect retirement present: the first U.S. gold medal since 1948.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | February 5, 2010
LAKE PLACID, N.Y. - -Two years ago, Russian bobsled federation officials approached the designer of one of the world's fastest bobsleds and offered him "money, women, money and women" to transfer his loyalties - and secrets - from the U.S. team. "I told them, 'It's not going to happen. This stuff isn't for sale,' " says Bob Cuneo, retelling the story while leaning on a bar and laughing. Now 18 years after he partnered with former NASCAR driver Geoff Bodine to produce a world-class winter racing machine, Cuneo hopes the four-man competition will end with the perfect retirement present: the first U.S. gold medal since 1948.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd , kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
If I could give one bit of advice to the Ravens as they prepare to face the Green Bay Packers on Monday night at Lambeau Field, it would be: Stay close to those heated benches when you're not in the game. I say this because the temperature at game time is expected to be in the low 20s. There's also a good chance of snow. And because this is Lambeau in December, you can pretty much count on hitting the bad-weather trifecta. That's right: The wind should be blowing, too. Look, they don't call it "the Frozen Tundra" because people are slathering on Coppertone and wearing Hawaiian shirts.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,Staff Writer | February 17, 1992
LA PLAGNE, France -- You could call it the humbling of Herschel Walker.Earlier in the week, before the beginning of the Olympic two-man bobsled competition, Walker, the famous halfback-turned-bobsledder, said he was now "the best [bobsled] pusher in the world" despite his almost total lack of training.But when the two-man was over yesterday on a cool, windy afternoon high in the Alps, the world's "best" was in seventh place, far behind the gold-medal winners from Switzerland, Gustav Weder and Donat Acklin.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | February 17, 1992
LA PLAGNE, France -- There are bad days and there are very bad days, and let's go right to the bottom: sliding three-fourths of a mile down a mountain of ice at 50 mph, with a 400-pound sled on your head.A very bad day."Basically," John Amabile said, "it was like being trapped in a plane going down."Everyone else saw it on television. He was inside the sled."My shoulder was riding along the ice, and I could start to feel my uniform and skin burning," he said yesterday. "It took a few seconds for the shock of what was happening to wear off, and then I realized that my arm basically was on fire."
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | November 16, 2008
Voters in Maryland's 1st Congressional District were urged to vote against Democrat Frank M. Kratovil Jr. because he agreed to a plea bargain involving a child molester. The assumption: Voters would see the two-term Queen Anne's County prosecutor as soft on crime, a hopeless liberal Democrat. It didn't work. Mr. Kratovil's accuser, Republican state Sen. Andy Harris, lost to Mr. Kratovil in a race almost everyone thought Mr. Harris would win. Across the nation, at many levels, negative campaigning was in full stride during the last election.
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