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NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,Chicago Tribune | September 5, 2007
The dwindling days of summer don't always lend themselves to culinary ambition: It's hot and I'm lazy. So, taking a cue from the nickname, I make the hot dog my supper of choice. When there's a baseball game scheduled the evening of my culinary dog day, all the better. Even when you dress up the pup with a zesty slaw and assorted accouterments, this supper is speedier than a fastball. Because the franks are precooked, the microwave heats up the entree in about a minute. Before you know it, it's time to step outside, turn on the radio and enjoy supper.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | January 20, 2012
Many of us throw our healthy-eating out the door at football game-watch parties. I mean who wants to eat veggies when there are chicken wings, spinach dip, sausage dogs and nachos on the menu? Maryland's First Lady Katie O'Malley wants people to at least try to eat healthy when the Ravens play the New England Patriots on Sunday. She launched the ChopChop Maryland ! initiative last year to promote healthy eating. This week the initiative has a recipe for a healthy cole slaw to eat on Game Day called Purple Slaw.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | July 28, 1999
Summer is the prime season for coleslaw, a deceptively simple dish that has almost as many incarnations as there are cooks to prepare it.There's slaw with scallions, slaw with hot peppers, slaw with bell peppers, slaw with crab meat and slaw with citrus zest -- and those are just a few of the variations. Coleslaw recipes pop up around the world -- from Baltimore to Latin America and from France to Russia.It seems almost every culture has a version of this crispy dish, probably because cabbage -- the traditional ingredient -- is among the oldest foods cultivated by mankind.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Don Schline, a senior sales advisor with Mackenzie Commercial Real Estate in Baltimore, and his buddies really know how to throw a tailgate party. The core group of 15, organized and motivated by their friend Scott McClure, are all friends from their high schools days. The group has been tailgating together in Lot H1 at M&T stadium at every home game, rain or shine, since the Ravens played their first game there. They are united by their passion for their hometown team and their love of good food.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1997
Off the tree and out of the garden comes this red apple and cabbage coleslaw.Jane R. Lynn of Lutherville requested the slaw. She remembered the "delicious slaw served at Morgan Millard Restaurant Gallery in Roland Park. Her answer came from Frank C. Alfonso of Baltimore, whose recipe came "from a 1970s cookbook put out by a VFW ladies auxiliary."Alfonso's red apple cole slawServes 63 red apples4 cups shredded cabbage1/2 cup mayonnaise1 cup sour cream1 teaspoon sugar1 tablespoon celery seedjuice from one to two lemons for dipping apples.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | May 7, 1995
The battle of Old Bay begins at noon May 15, when chefs from five Baltimore neighborhoods and the downtown hotels go toque to toque to see who can create the best chicken dish with Old Bay seasoning.The event, part of the Preakness celebration, takes place at the amphitheater area at Harborplace, and celebrity judges and members of the public will sample the dishes and choose their favorite. The neighborhoods are Inner Harbor, Little Italy, Fells Point/Canton, Federal Hill, and Charles Street/Market Center.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | September 30, 2001
I enjoy trying new restaurants, especially when out of town, so when friends invited us for a weekend to their house on Cape Cod, I suggested that we eat out one of the evenings. Our hosts responded enthusiastically and chose a seaside restaurant that had opened earlier in the season. I eagerly read the menu and, intrigued by a side dish of Parmesan-Black Pepper Cole-slaw, ordered it along with roasted halibut on a bed of asparagus. The fish and vegetables were cooked perfectly, but my slaw was unexceptional.
FEATURES
By Elise Chisolm | February 1, 1992
TANEYTOWN DELI & SANDWICH SHOPPE 10 Mellor Ave., Catonsville. Hours: Open 6 a.m to 3 p.m. Mondays to Fridays and 6.30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call (410) 747-2673 or (410) 747-8686.The Taneytown deli, known for its 6-foot subs and overstuffed sandwiches, has been in business since 1947 and is a favorite of the locals. Businessmen and people who want a catered party are also loyal customers.The place is small -- there's no seating -- but it has a big menu, and you get a lot for your money.
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | January 18, 2009
Australian Open 7 p.m., 3:30 a.m. [ESPN2] Certainly, you will be watching the Ravens when tennis' first major of the year begins, but how about later? Still thrilled by the Ravens' victory, still so wired you can't sleep, make yourself a snack - perhaps a sandwich without french fries and cole slaw on it - and sit down in front of your TV at 3:30 in the morning to see them whack the fuzz off the ball Down Under.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | November 6, 2008
Pappas Seafood Carry Out 1801 Taylor Ave., Parkville; 410-665-4000; open 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday-Thursday, 10 a.m.- 9 p.m. Friday-Saturday In March, the Pappas family took over Hale's, a fixture on the local seafood scene. In addition to presiding over the popular Parkville restaurant, the family also operates a carryout in a sparkling glass-fronted building across the street from the restaurant. Each side of the street has its own kitchen and cook. I was startled when I called the carryout and the woman taking my order asked if I wanted my bowl of Maryland crab soup to be hot or cold.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | October 6, 2011
This time of year school and work lunchboxes can provide a plethora of healthy local fruit that will please even the most meticulous food Nazi. Apples come to mind, but so do pears, which are readily available at the supermarket. There are almost as many varieties of pears as there are of apples, but we usually see only a few of them around here: Bosc, Bartletts, d'anjou, seckel, maybe Asian (aka Nashi) pears. Boscs generally appear later in the season, are tall, lean and have a brownish skin.
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | January 18, 2009
Australian Open 7 p.m., 3:30 a.m. [ESPN2] Certainly, you will be watching the Ravens when tennis' first major of the year begins, but how about later? Still thrilled by the Ravens' victory, still so wired you can't sleep, make yourself a snack - perhaps a sandwich without french fries and cole slaw on it - and sit down in front of your TV at 3:30 in the morning to see them whack the fuzz off the ball Down Under.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | November 6, 2008
Pappas Seafood Carry Out 1801 Taylor Ave., Parkville; 410-665-4000; open 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday-Thursday, 10 a.m.- 9 p.m. Friday-Saturday In March, the Pappas family took over Hale's, a fixture on the local seafood scene. In addition to presiding over the popular Parkville restaurant, the family also operates a carryout in a sparkling glass-fronted building across the street from the restaurant. Each side of the street has its own kitchen and cook. I was startled when I called the carryout and the woman taking my order asked if I wanted my bowl of Maryland crab soup to be hot or cold.
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,Chicago Tribune | September 5, 2007
The dwindling days of summer don't always lend themselves to culinary ambition: It's hot and I'm lazy. So, taking a cue from the nickname, I make the hot dog my supper of choice. When there's a baseball game scheduled the evening of my culinary dog day, all the better. Even when you dress up the pup with a zesty slaw and assorted accouterments, this supper is speedier than a fastball. Because the franks are precooked, the microwave heats up the entree in about a minute. Before you know it, it's time to step outside, turn on the radio and enjoy supper.
NEWS
By Mollie Katzen and Mollie Katzen,Tribune Media Services | May 16, 2007
What is that unidentified object -- the light-green or purple orb with striations -- lurking among the salad fixings in the produce market? It's kohlrabi, the swollen stem of an uncommon vegetable with hidden, wonderful characteristics. Kohlrabi tastes like a cross between jicama and a mild radish, and delivers a refreshing crunch that keeps its spunk even when marinated in acid and oil. This trait lends itself perfectly to a slaw, where you want the ingredients to yield just a little bit to the dressing but to retain a crispness throughout.
NEWS
By ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | March 5, 2006
Lettuce salads can be problematic because of the wilt factor; broccoli slaw solves that problem. Combined with a grain or pasta, it makes a hearty, healthful, portable salad base. This is an especially nice vegetarian combo. And total preparation time is about 5 minutes ... how much easier could this be? BROWN RICE SALAD WITH ORANGES AND BROCCOLI SLAW MAKES 4 SERVINGS 1 (8.8-ounce) pouch precooked whole-grain brown rice 1 / 2 (12-ounce) bag broccoli slaw 1 (14-ounce) can mandarin orange sections, drained 1 / 3 cup sunflower seeds 1 / 2 cup bottled ginger dressing Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Prepare rice according to package directions.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 14, 2004
Veal is an expensive choice for a weeknight dinner, but if you are celebrating a special occasion, it is worth it for its mild, versatile flavor. We've cooked the chops in a skillet to make better use of the delicious pan drippings. We've added a touch of the spice mixture known as herbes de Provence (rosemary, sage, thyme and lavender, available premixed in the spice aisle) and a warm bell-pepper slaw. Serve the veal chops with a spicy Rhone red wine, and for dessert buy those tiny French cakes known as madeleines at a bakery.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 14, 2004
Veal is an expensive choice for a weeknight dinner, but if you are celebrating a special occasion, it is worth it for its mild, versatile flavor. We've cooked the chops in a skillet to make better use of the delicious pan drippings. We've added a touch of the spice mixture known as herbes de Provence (rosemary, sage, thyme and lavender, available premixed in the spice aisle) and a warm bell-pepper slaw. Serve the veal chops with a spicy Rhone red wine, and for dessert buy those tiny French cakes known as madeleines at a bakery.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 2004
When Demetris Nicolaidis began making plans for opening a barbecue restaurant in Baltimore, he did what any sensible person would do: He headed south. According to his mom, who works with him at the newly opened Chewy's Southern Pit on Dundalk Avenue, Nicolaidis made several trips through barbecue country - the Carolinas and into Georgia - checking out restaurants and cadging recipes. The homework paid off; Chewy's is a winner. You can tell it as soon as you walk into the small eatery, which sits across the street from a steelworkers union hall.
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