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NEWS
July 30, 2005
On Thursday, July 28, 2005, JEROME SLAVIN beloved husband of Margery Slavin (nee Frank) and the late Elizabeth Slavin (nee Dunn), loving father of William Slavin of Hollywood, FL, and Michael Slavin of Pembroke Pines, FL, devoted father-in-law of Denise Slavin, beloved brother of Morton Slavin of Irving, MA, loving grandfather of Ian, April, China and Emily Slavin. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS HOME INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Sunday, July 31, at 1 P.M. Interment Baltimore Hebrew Congregation Cemetery-Berrymans Lane.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun Reporter | September 26, 2006
Four years ago, a nonprofit education firm called Success for All occupied four floors in a Towson office building and employed 500 people. Hundreds of schools across the country were signing up to use its highly regarded reading curriculum, which stresses phonics. Today, Success for All has laid off two-thirds of its employees and shrunk to two floors. A federal inspector general's report appears to explain why. It says the U.S. Department of Education steered federal grant money to certain reading programs and away from others.
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NEWS
August 3, 2005
Jerome A. Slavin, a retired industrial engineer and decorated World War II veteran, died of lung cancer Thursday at a hospice in Boca Raton, Fla. The Ellicott City resident was 79. Mr. Slavin was born and raised in Springfield, Mass. After graduating from high school in 1942, he enlisted in the Army and served in Europe with an artillery unit of the 84th Infantry Division, better known as the Railsplitters. He fought at the Battle of the Bulge and helped liberate Salzwedel and Hannover-Ahlem concentration camps.
NEWS
By FRED SCHULTE and FRED SCHULTE,SUN REPORTER | March 2, 2006
Three years after their teenage son, Michael, died from taking a prescription painkiller, George and Alicia Osgood are still waiting for the outcome of a state investigation into his death. The couple wants the Maryland Board of Physicians to discipline the doctor who prescribed the strongest dose on the market of the drug, OxyContin, to treat the 19-year-old's sore throat. "I can't believe that the Board of Physicians is not doing anything about it," said George Osgood, a civil engineer who lives in Upper Marlboro.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | July 25, 1999
I read 65 or 70 books thoroughly each year and read significant parts of several hundred others. When I find substance and pleasure in something that is unheralded and unexpected, it gives me a near-ecstatic delight.Such a book is "The Woman Who Cut Off Her Leg at the Maidstone Club and Other Stories" by Julia Slavin (Holt, 194, $22). It is a collection of short stories that are, individually and together, improbable, outrageous, fanciful, captivating and somehow for all their horrific touches of surrealism very, very cheerful.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | April 11, 1993
In 1979, Ron Edmonds, an influential educational researcher, set forth a simple proposition that flatly contradicted many of the assumptions that influence the way schools work.In an article on effective schools for the urban poor he said: "We can, whenever and wherever we choose, successfully teach all children whose schooling is of interest to us."He didn't say that we need to find new ways to deal with these problem students. Or that under the right circumstances we can succeed more often with these kids.
NEWS
August 15, 2005
THE READING First program, part of the 2002 federal No Child Left Behind law, focuses on improving reading skills among youngsters as the key to broader academic success. But a Baltimore-based researcher and others are accusing Reading First of catering more to highly paid consultants than to the low-income children it is targeted to serve. The Department of Education's inspector general has wisely agreed to investigate the charges; he should do so quickly and thoroughly. Reading First has generated a lot of excitement because it is pumping about $1 billion annually - for an expected total of about $6 billion by 2007 - into 4,700 schools to enhance reading skills of first-, second- and third-graders.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Staff Writer | April 14, 1993
Thirteen children sit on tiny chairs, their attention captivated by a gray elephant puppet. "NNNN" says the elephant. "NNN.""Put on your thinking caps!" says the teacher. "What letter do you think goes with that sound?""N!" shout the children, squirming in eagerness, tracing the letter in the air with fingers as imaginary pencils.Puppets, singing and writing in air may seem unusual fodder for academic discussion, but research from this prekindergarten class at Dallas F. Nicholas Sr. Elementary School shows a new curriculum developed at the Johns Hopkins University may help low-income students learn to read better.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1997
ELEVEN YEARS after its launch by the Johns Hopkins University, one of the nation's most successful approaches to schooling for inner-city children is so popular that it can't keep up with demand.Popular everywhere, that is, but Baltimore, the city of its birth.The program is Success for All, now in 750 schools across the nation, with 400 to be added next year.Success for All addresses the near certainty that children who don't learn to read in the early years are doomed to a life of failure.
NEWS
By FRED SCHULTE and FRED SCHULTE,SUN REPORTER | March 2, 2006
Three years after their teenage son, Michael, died from taking a prescription painkiller, George and Alicia Osgood are still waiting for the outcome of a state investigation into his death. The couple wants the Maryland Board of Physicians to discipline the doctor who prescribed the strongest dose on the market of the drug, OxyContin, to treat the 19-year-old's sore throat. "I can't believe that the Board of Physicians is not doing anything about it," said George Osgood, a civil engineer who lives in Upper Marlboro.
NEWS
August 15, 2005
THE READING First program, part of the 2002 federal No Child Left Behind law, focuses on improving reading skills among youngsters as the key to broader academic success. But a Baltimore-based researcher and others are accusing Reading First of catering more to highly paid consultants than to the low-income children it is targeted to serve. The Department of Education's inspector general has wisely agreed to investigate the charges; he should do so quickly and thoroughly. Reading First has generated a lot of excitement because it is pumping about $1 billion annually - for an expected total of about $6 billion by 2007 - into 4,700 schools to enhance reading skills of first-, second- and third-graders.
NEWS
August 3, 2005
Jerome A. Slavin, a retired industrial engineer and decorated World War II veteran, died of lung cancer Thursday at a hospice in Boca Raton, Fla. The Ellicott City resident was 79. Mr. Slavin was born and raised in Springfield, Mass. After graduating from high school in 1942, he enlisted in the Army and served in Europe with an artillery unit of the 84th Infantry Division, better known as the Railsplitters. He fought at the Battle of the Bulge and helped liberate Salzwedel and Hannover-Ahlem concentration camps.
NEWS
July 30, 2005
On Thursday, July 28, 2005, JEROME SLAVIN beloved husband of Margery Slavin (nee Frank) and the late Elizabeth Slavin (nee Dunn), loving father of William Slavin of Hollywood, FL, and Michael Slavin of Pembroke Pines, FL, devoted father-in-law of Denise Slavin, beloved brother of Morton Slavin of Irving, MA, loving grandfather of Ian, April, China and Emily Slavin. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS HOME INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Sunday, July 31, at 1 P.M. Interment Baltimore Hebrew Congregation Cemetery-Berrymans Lane.
NEWS
By Ron Snyder and Ron Snyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 2000
When reading teachers get together, there's plenty of talk about "balance" -- how to achieve the right mix of phonics and comprehension to ensure achievement in the classroom. But more is involved in successfully balanced reading instruction than classroom technique, said John F. O'Flahavan, an associate professor at the University of Maryland, College Park, who addressed a recent statewide symposium sponsored by Maryland State Teachers Association. "Parents, teachers and administrators need to be there to help students become better readers," said O'Flahavan, who coordinates the elementary education program at College Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | July 25, 1999
I read 65 or 70 books thoroughly each year and read significant parts of several hundred others. When I find substance and pleasure in something that is unheralded and unexpected, it gives me a near-ecstatic delight.Such a book is "The Woman Who Cut Off Her Leg at the Maidstone Club and Other Stories" by Julia Slavin (Holt, 194, $22). It is a collection of short stories that are, individually and together, improbable, outrageous, fanciful, captivating and somehow for all their horrific touches of surrealism very, very cheerful.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1998
Architects of four leading reform plans for troubled urban schools, meeting in Baltimore yesterday, agreed that radical changes are needed. But they differed sharply over whether the changes should be mostly designed by principals and teachers or outside experts.Edward T. Joyner, executive director of Yale University's School Development Program, criticized those who would impose change on teachers and administrators. And Henry M. Levin of Stanford University, leader of the Accelerated Schools effort, criticized schools that are "failing children, but are in compliance with all the rules," and he deplored "stultifying routines."
NEWS
By Ron Snyder and Ron Snyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 2000
When reading teachers get together, there's plenty of talk about "balance" -- how to achieve the right mix of phonics and comprehension to ensure achievement in the classroom. But more is involved in successfully balanced reading instruction than classroom technique, said John F. O'Flahavan, an associate professor at the University of Maryland, College Park, who addressed a recent statewide symposium sponsored by Maryland State Teachers Association. "Parents, teachers and administrators need to be there to help students become better readers," said O'Flahavan, who coordinates the elementary education program at College Park.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1998
Architects of four leading reform plans for troubled urban schools, meeting in Baltimore yesterday, agreed that radical changes are needed. But they differed sharply over whether the changes should be mostly designed by principals and teachers or outside experts.Edward T. Joyner, executive director of Yale University's School Development Program, criticized those who would impose change on teachers and administrators. And Henry M. Levin of Stanford University, leader of the Accelerated Schools effort, criticized schools that are "failing children, but are in compliance with all the rules," and he deplored "stultifying routines."
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1997
ELEVEN YEARS after its launch by the Johns Hopkins University, one of the nation's most successful approaches to schooling for inner-city children is so popular that it can't keep up with demand.Popular everywhere, that is, but Baltimore, the city of its birth.The program is Success for All, now in 750 schools across the nation, with 400 to be added next year.Success for All addresses the near certainty that children who don't learn to read in the early years are doomed to a life of failure.
NEWS
By Wayne Hardin and Wayne Hardin,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Neatness hardly rates as an emphasis for Robert E. Slavin, one of the country's leading education reformers, in his incredibly cluttered office across from the Johns Hopkins University Homewood tennis courts."
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