Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSlavery
IN THE NEWS

Slavery

NEWS
By Charles Jacobs | January 5, 1999
IT IS a year before the millennium and Theresa Nybol Deng is a slave. In May, she was taken captive when the government-armed militia stormed her village in southern Sudan. Soldiers shot the men, looted the village and carted off as many women and children as they could. Theresa is 12 years old. She can be purchased for $50.If her fate is anything like that of tens of thousands of black Africans who have become chattel in Sudan's civil war, Theresa has been sold and bought. She is likely serving a master somewhere in northern Sudan, Libya or the Persian Gulf.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 11, 1997
Sophocles and slavery come together with bitter poignancy in the first play by former U.S. poet laureate Rita Dove.Dove has based her elegantly written verse drama, "The Darker Face of the Earth," on Sophocles' "Oedipus Rex," changing the setting to the antebellum South. The visually stunning, music-laden production, co-produced by New Jersey's Crossroads Theatre Company, is currently at Washington's Kennedy Center.Updating Greek classics for the stage isn't new. The most famous example is Eugene O'Neill's "Mourning Becomes Electra," which moved Aeschylus' "Oresteia" to post-Civil War New England.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 25, 1994
Radio listeners have a fascinating opportunity tomorrow to consider America's slaveholding past from a rarely heard perspective.In "The Other Side," airing on NPR's "Weekend Edition" (8 a.m. on WJHU-FM 88.1), a New York-based print journalist from a comfortable Southern upbringing recounts his efforts to find descendants of slaves owned by his plantation forebears."To this day my motives are not clear," says writer Edward Ball early in the program. "But when I look across the rice fields where thousands of people worked, I want to hear their story told alongside my family's tale."
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Sun Staff | November 23, 2003
An Imperfect God: George Washington, His Slaves, and the Creation of America, by Henry Wiencek. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 416 pages. $26. Henry Wiencek has not come to bury George Washington, but to strip away some of the myths and let us see the Founding Father in a clearer, more sober light. There was a time when this was unthinkable. Go to Baltimore's Mount Vernon Square and you will see a monument from the Golden Age of Washington worship. He is dressed in robes, as if he were a Caesar, or a god. We now know there are no gods among us, just men and women whose faults and imperfections render them less heroic but more human.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 20, 2000
Seven years ago, Sidney Krome, an English professor at Coppin State College, was team-teaching an interdisciplinary honors course called Literature in History, which focused on the Holocaust and slavery in America. One week he brought in a guest speaker -- Baltimorean Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who saved his life by jumping out of a train bound for Auschwitz. Krome expected the session with Bretholz to last an hour. Instead, it stretched out to four hours. "It was an incredibly intense experience," the professor recalls.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 30, 2000
IN ANNAPOLIS, Del. Emmett C. Burns Jr. wants a public apology for slavery 135 years after the fact. He is a proud and sensitive man wishing simple expression of sorrow for this cruelest act of American history. So naturally, when his bill was heard last week, by the House Committee on Commerce and Government Affairs, it failed. There were 10 votes in favor of an official apology to black people -- and 10 abstentions. "Ten abstentions," Burns was saying yesterday, chuckling mordantly. "Highly unusual, I would say."
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 9, 1998
YOU'D think President Clinton had nominated Johnnie Cochran as attorney general.Instead, speaking during his recent sojourn to Africa, the president said only this: "Going back to the time before we were even a nation, European Americans received the fruits of the slave trade. And we were wrong in that."I thought it an unremarkable -- and unassailable -- statement. Silly me.Conservative observers, including George Will, Patrick Buchanan and Tom DeLay, a Texas Republican, have pronounced themselves scandalized by what they apparently see as a crucifixion of national pride on a cross of red, black and green.
NEWS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE AND GREGORY KANE and GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE AND GREGORY KANE,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1996
Our search for slavery brings us to this place of human misfortune and man-made misery.Here an angry old man voices the humiliation of being offered as a slave in a town square; a girl recounts her harrowing wait to learn whether her Muslim master wants her as a daughter or a concubine; a blind widow tells us she may kill herself because the 4-year-old daughter who was her "eyes" has been abducted by slave raiders.To hear these hideous tales, we have flown illegally, deep into the Sudanese interior, where the small, chartered aircraft stays on a red dirt landing strip long enough only to drop us off and pick up six war wounded.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 18, 1997
TC First President Clinton apologizes for the Tuskegee experiment, a "study" in which about 400 black men stricken with syphilis went untreated for 40 years. The "study" was sponsored by the U.S. government to determine the effects of syphilis. It was stopped in 1972 only after the much-maligned news media exposed it.What good does an apology do now? It might make some folks feel better, but I'd prefer some commitment from the president that this thing will never happen again. And he can start by opening government files to a congressional committee that will investigate whether there is more of this hanky-panky going on today.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | May 22, 1999
YOU probably don't know their names: Courtney Hutt, Tia Jackson, LaTasha Peele, Nikki Harley and Anissa Brown. They're members of the Mu Pi chapter of Delta Sigma Theta sorority. They attend the University of Delaware. And they're very concerned about the reports of slavery in Sudan and Mauritania.So concerned, in fact, that they sponsored a forum on May 7 to learn more on the subject. They did some research themselves. Then they brought in a speaker. At the program, attended by some 40 to 50 students, they read from the testimony of one escaped Sudanese slave who told how she was captured by government soldiers, forced on a tortuous march in which she was raped repeatedly and then given to an Arab family as a slave.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.