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Slavery

NEWS
July 9, 2003
President George Washington issued orders in his will that his slaves be freed after his death; President Thomas Jefferson did not. Twelve presidents owned slaves. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, effective Jan. 1, 1863, which freed very few slaves because it affected only those held in rebellious states - and those states ignored it. Those in states loyal to the Union could keep their slaves, and slavery was ended only by the passage of the 13th Amendment.
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NEWS
By Charles Jacobs & Mohamed Athie | July 14, 1994
LAST MONTH, Amnesty International's American branch decided it was time to abolish slavery.Presented with evidence of human bondage in North Africa, the members voted to add to an already crowded mandate the emancipation of chattel slaves.It may be hard to believe that in 1994 a new abolitionist movement is needed.Today, in the former French colony of Mauritania, where slavery was ended -- on paper -- in 1980, the U.S. State Department estimates that 90,000 blacks still live as the property of Berbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 24, 2003
The Known World, by Edward P. Jones. Amistad/ HarperCollins Publishers. 400 pages. $24.95. There are many dark moments in this fascinating story of slavery in antebellum Virginia, but none is more poignant than when Augustus Townsend, a well-known free black man, meets three white patrollers on an isolated country road. Such confrontations happened thousands of times in our history, and in each there was the potential for disaster. Jones, who won the PEN/Hemingway award for his collection of short stories, Lost in the City, sets The Known World in Manchester County, a speck on the map somewhere near Richmond.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 19, 1997
Once again, Sun readers strike back at the bitter, angry B.R.U.T. (Black Racist Uncle Tom) Gregory Kane. Don't think I'm upset by these slings and arrows. Folks reading the paper and getting upset beats them not reading it at all by several light-years.A reader whose identity is known only as "subscriber" wrote in response to my Jackie Robinson column. Writing to Sun reader representative Ed Hewitt, subscriber gave the following tongue-lashing:"You don't have to scratch Gregory Kane too deeply to turn a nominally sensible American into a senseless African-American bigot."
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka | February 10, 2007
A state Senate resolution introduced this week would require Maryland to apologize for "the role the state played in maintaining the institution of slavery and its attendant evils." "I don't think anyone from the state has ever apologized for this atrocity that was perpetrated on our people," said Sen. Nathaniel Exum, a Prince George's County Democrat and the proposal's lead sponsor. The Senate passed a similar measure last year, but it failed in the House of Delegates. Exum said Deputy Majority Whip Michael L. Vaughn, also a Prince George's County Democrat, will lead the push for the resolution in the Senate.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 11, 1997
Sophocles and slavery come together with bitter poignancy in the first play by former U.S. poet laureate Rita Dove.Dove has based her elegantly written verse drama, "The Darker Face of the Earth," on Sophocles' "Oedipus Rex," changing the setting to the antebellum South. The visually stunning, music-laden production, co-produced by New Jersey's Crossroads Theatre Company, is currently at Washington's Kennedy Center.Updating Greek classics for the stage isn't new. The most famous example is Eugene O'Neill's "Mourning Becomes Electra," which moved Aeschylus' "Oresteia" to post-Civil War New England.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | July 28, 2008
This is how John Davis became a slave: He was walking one evening from the train depot in Goodwater, Ala., when a white man appeared in the road. "Nigger," he demanded, "have you got any money?" The white man, Robert Franklin, was a constable. He claimed Mr. Davis owed him. This was news to Mr. Davis. "I don't owe you anything," he said. But what Mr. Davis said did not matter. He was arrested that night and summarily convicted. A wealthy landowner, John Pace, paid the alleged $40 debt and a $35 fine in exchange for Mr. Davis' mark - Mr. Davis was illiterate - on a contract binding him to work 10 months at any task Mr. Pace demanded.
NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | March 26, 1998
FOR THE most part, people who call for reparations for slavery are written off as the lunatic fringe. Many white Americans say reparations are impossible because the slaves are dead, most white Americans did not own slaves and the ancestors of many white Americans immigrated here after slavery. They say that the 600,000 deaths in the Civil War is all the apology African-Americans deserve.Some African-Americans agree. Writer Stanley Crouch, who often accuses African-Americans of whining, said, ''We don't need a victim's gold card, and we don't need people feeling guilty about slavery; the whole idea of guilt just makes people madder.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 23, 1997
Lawrence K. Freeman is a brave man. He's probably one of the few Jews in America to call Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan a friend. Guts this guy Freeman has. Guts and passion. Maybe a little too much passion.One of Freeman's passions is Sudan, which he thinks is a gosh-darned swell country. He and a delegation of African-American state delegates and senators visited Sudan inSeptember and again in January. They found no slavery, a kind, loving and beneficent government and - according to one member of the group - no civil war.This past Thursday, Freeman, who is editor of Executive Intelligence Review and a member of the Schiller Institute, a sponsor of the delegation, and members of that second delegation held a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 20, 2000
Seven years ago, Sidney Krome, an English professor at Coppin State College, was team-teaching an interdisciplinary honors course called Literature in History, which focused on the Holocaust and slavery in America. One week he brought in a guest speaker -- Baltimorean Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who saved his life by jumping out of a train bound for Auschwitz. Krome expected the session with Bretholz to last an hour. Instead, it stretched out to four hours. "It was an incredibly intense experience," the professor recalls.
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