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NEWS
July 14, 2013
Reporter Arthur Hirsch 's article on the recent article on the re-enactment at the 150 t h anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg included a familiar Civil War anecdote about a Confederate soldier who had been captured at Fort Donelson ("A defining day relived," July 2). Responding to a question from his Union captors, he famously answered, "We're fighting because y'all are down here. " As a source of empirical evidence, this tale invites profoundly misleading interpretation: There is a duty to disclose the message actually intended by a Rebel who spoke his answer fully seven months before Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.
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NEWS
April 8, 2010
RICHMOND, Va. - Gov. Bob McDonnell on Wednesday conceded a "major omission" for not noting slavery in declaring April Confederate History Month in Virginia. As part of his apology, McDonnell inserted into the proclamation a paragraph condemning slavery as "evil and inhumane" and blaming it as the cause of the Civil War. In a 400-word statement his office issued, McDonnell said the failure to include a slavery reference was a mistake. On Tuesday, McDonnell said in a telephone news conference that he wasn't focused on slavery in drafting the decree but on Civil War history.
NEWS
April 11, 2011
In response to Leonard Pitts, Jr.'s column ("What was Civil War about? Listen to the voices of the Confederacy," April 10), it should be noted that political motivation and post hoc justifications are often fluid, and evil, sadly, is often relative. President Lincoln famously said he didn't care about freeing the slaves, but only about saving the Union. Despite this, Mr. Lincoln well knew that the one could not be accomplished without the other. While some of the Union side harangued about the evils of slavery, they were blind to the North's complicity, exploiting slave-grown cotton for mills with dangerous machinery often operated by children, typically white European immigrants, as young as 8 laboring for 16-hours-a-day, often 7 days a week.
NEWS
June 21, 2012
In his column ("Sailabration brings out the mobs," June 19), Dan Rodricks resoundingly endorses the content of a letter submitted to Archbishop William E. Lori by local Catholic Jeff Ross, to protest plans to include a quote from Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in a forthcoming evening Mass. The quote in question implores Confederate soldiers to ask God's aid in their effort to defend the Old South's liberties and her cause. Mr. Ross declares the preservation of slavery an inextricable element of those liberties and that cause, and he opines that "slavery is the institution that Lee labored to preserve.
NEWS
By Nia Henderson and Nia Henderson,Sun reporter | May 16, 2007
Annapolis has joined a handful of jurisdictions across the country to officially apologize for its role in the American slave trade. The City Council passed a resolution unanimously Monday, with aldermen Michael Christman and Julie Stankivic abstaining. Sponsored by aldermen Richard Israel and Sam Shropshire, the measure went through substantial revisions, with the final version, drafted by Israel, expressing "profound regret" and recommending that the last week in October be a week for studying slavery.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | October 27, 1998
WASHINGTON -- It was not enough for Oprah Winfrey to do a movie about slavery. She felt she needed to live it, too. At least a little.So, she took off into the Maryland woods to participate -- blindfolded! -- in a re-enactment of what it was like to be a slave on the Underground Railroad.I was tempted to ridicule Oprah for her brief woodland adventure (Did she wear her designer hiking boots? Did her personal assistant tag along? What was her pager number? 1-800-TIC-BITE?)But I resisted, partly because I feel her pain.
NEWS
June 11, 1993
The story of the Chinese immigrants who spilled onto a New York beach this week is more than a tale of people so desperate to enter this country that they will try any means, legal or illegal. It is also a reminder that the scourge of slavery is not entirely dead. Outlawed for well over a century in most parts of the world, slavery has stood as one of the human rights battles the world has already won. But in many countries, millions of people still live and labor under slavery-like conditions.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
The Civil War casts a long shadow. In the first year of that wrenching conflict, Maryland's lawmakers voted unanimously for a constitutional amendment to bar the federal government from abolishing slavery. Now, more than 150 years later, some legislators in Annapolis are looking to put the state on the right side of history. A Senate committee is scheduled Thursday to consider rescinding the state's 1862 ratification of the so-called "shadow" 13th Amendment, which would have locked slavery into the U.S. Constitution.
NEWS
By William Styron | August 5, 1994
Vineyard Haven, Mass. -- IMAGINEERING, an adroit neologism, is the Walt Disney Co.'s name for the corporate unit involved in developing Disney's America, the projected mammoth theme park in northern Virginia.Not long ago, the chief imagineer, Robert Weis, described what would be in store, among other historical attractions, for hordes of tourists."We want to make you feel what it was like to be a slave, and what it was like to escape through the Underground Railroad." He added that the exhibits would "not take a Pollyanna view" but would be "painful, disturbing and agonizing."
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | June 13, 1993
The Chinese who scrambled onto a New York beach one recent night are but a tiny blip in the annals of illegal immigration. Their arrival was more dramatic and public than most, but the conditions of their travel -- and of the servitude that awaited many of them -- are not uncommon at all.Like every country, the United States guards its right to control its borders and to regulate who can and cannot enter. But like other affluent countries, it is finding that desperate people can make any border porous.
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