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Slavery In Sudan

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By SUN STAFF REPORT | July 12, 1996
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, holding its 87th annual convention here, condemned slavery in Sudan and called on the Organization of African States to agree to a plan to abolish slavery in Sudan.The resolution passed by the group also supported "economic sanctions and sanctions on military assistance or arms transfers to the government of any foreign country that participates, or is otherwise involved, in the establishment or conduct of slavery originating from Sudan."
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NEWS
By Gregory Kane | July 11, 2001
SO THERE I WAS, sitting in Howard University's Blackburn Center about a week before America's Independence Day celebration. The occasion was a debate on the subject "Does slavery exist in the Sudan?" Muslim after Muslim filed into the meeting hall, which was soon packed. I glanced out the window and still more came up the walk. I soon felt a disturbing George Armstrong Custer feeling come over me. The debate had six panelists -- three of whom believe slavery exists in Sudan and three who are living in denial -- who each delivered a five-minute statement.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 25, 1997
Two reporters for The Sun, Gregory Kane and Gilbert Lewthwaite, have been awarded the Overseas Press Club's Eric and Amy Burger Award for their series on slavery in Sudan.The three-part series, titled "Witness to Slavery," was published in June.The Burger Award is given each year for the previous year's best work in human rights reporting. The award was presented at the Overseas Press Club's annual dinner in New York last night.The series by Kane and Lewthwaite described their visit to a slave market in southern Sudan, where a civil war is being fought by the Islamic fundamentalist government in the north and its allies against the Christian and animist inhabitants of the south.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 10, 2000
CHARLES JACOBS isn't, under ordinary circumstances, what you might call an unhappy man. He's as happy or as sad as most of us. But these days, he's a bit happier than usual. And the man responsible for Jacobs' upbeat mood is none other than William Jefferson Clinton, the 42nd president of the United States. Jacobs is head of the American Anti-Slavery Group, which has toiled since the early 1990s to enlighten folks about continued slavery around the world. Its focus lately has been on the worst offenders in Africa - Sudan and Mauritania.
NEWS
June 18, 1996
"WHERE IS THE PROOF?" asked Minister Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam in response to accusations that he had cozied up to a government that tolerated the enslavement of black people. "If slavery exists, why don't you go as a member of the press, and you look inside Sudan, and if you find it, then you come back and tell the American people what you found?"The proof was evident to two Baltimore Sun reporters who took up Mr. Farrakhan's challenge, trekked into southern Sudan and purchased the freedom of two Dinka boys.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Republican chairman of a key congressional human rights panel announced yesterday that he would hold hearings into slavery in Sudan."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gregory Kane and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gregory Kane,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1996
MANYIEL, Sudan -- In the shade of a mango tree deep in the African bush, near the fish, fruit and vegetable market, we count the money one last time.It is a 2-inch stack of Sudanese bills, worth $1,000 - a large sum in a poor region of the poorest country on the world's poorest continent. It would buy every commodity in the market. But that's not what we are here for.We are here to buy a slave.Before us, waiting abjectly on the baking, barren ground, is a sight to chill the human heart: a dozen young boys, their bodies caked with dust, their eyes downcast.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | September 24, 2000
THE government of Sudan - that east African nation where civil war has raged for the last 17 years and slavery is still not only practiced but perfected - is really in trouble. Sudan, led since 1989 - some would say the more accurate term would be "misled" - by the National Islamic Front, has aroused the ire of many. A United Nations fact-finder said slavery exists in Sudan. This paper sent two reporters to the country in 1996 and reached the same conclusion, as have human rights groups.
NEWS
July 23, 1996
World action needed on slavery in SudanThe Sun published (June 16-18) a three-part series, ''Witness to Slavery,'' reporting the experiences of two reporters and their documenting the existence of slavery in the Sudan.This series of articles highlighted for me an outrageous condition in the Sudan that evidently has been often reported by the United Nations, the U.S. Department of State and human rights organizations of slavery in Sudan and Mauritania.As a descendant of a once-enslaved people in the United States, and having information about this unspeakable treatment of Africans by Africans, of humans by humans, I lift my voice in outrage against slavery in the Republic of Sudan and wherever else in Africa it is found.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 10, 2000
CHARLES JACOBS isn't, under ordinary circumstances, what you might call an unhappy man. He's as happy or as sad as most of us. But these days, he's a bit happier than usual. And the man responsible for Jacobs' upbeat mood is none other than William Jefferson Clinton, the 42nd president of the United States. Jacobs is head of the American Anti-Slavery Group, which has toiled since the early 1990s to enlighten folks about continued slavery around the world. Its focus lately has been on the worst offenders in Africa - Sudan and Mauritania.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | September 24, 2000
THE government of Sudan - that east African nation where civil war has raged for the last 17 years and slavery is still not only practiced but perfected - is really in trouble. Sudan, led since 1989 - some would say the more accurate term would be "misled" - by the National Islamic Front, has aroused the ire of many. A United Nations fact-finder said slavery exists in Sudan. This paper sent two reporters to the country in 1996 and reached the same conclusion, as have human rights groups.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Decrying what they called the government-backed practice of slavery in Sudan, two congressmen launched a new drive yesterday to spotlight the practice and also prevent the Khartoum regime from using world food donations as a weapon in the nation's civil war.Tens of thousands of Africans from southern Sudan are being held as slaves, including women and children, and often are forced into hard labor or used as concubines, the lawmakers said."Thousands...
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 25, 1997
Two reporters for The Sun, Gregory Kane and Gilbert Lewthwaite, have been awarded the Overseas Press Club's Eric and Amy Burger Award for their series on slavery in Sudan.The three-part series, titled "Witness to Slavery," was published in June.The Burger Award is given each year for the previous year's best work in human rights reporting. The award was presented at the Overseas Press Club's annual dinner in New York last night.The series by Kane and Lewthwaite described their visit to a slave market in southern Sudan, where a civil war is being fought by the Islamic fundamentalist government in the north and its allies against the Christian and animist inhabitants of the south.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Republican chairman of a key congressional human rights panel announced yesterday that he would hold hearings into slavery in Sudan."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 22, 1996
NASHVILLE, Tenn.-- Giving black journalists a severe tongue-lashing yesterday at their convention, Louis Farrakhan defended his controversial trip to pariah states in Africa and the Middle East earlier this year and said he had asked the U.S. government for permission to accept money from Libya.The Nation of Islam leader told members of the National Association of Black Journalists that, because they worked for white-owned media, they were not free to tell what they knew to be the truth. He indirectly criticized The Sun's recent series on slavery in Sudan, whose Islamic fundamentalist regime he supports.
NEWS
July 23, 1996
World action needed on slavery in SudanThe Sun published (June 16-18) a three-part series, ''Witness to Slavery,'' reporting the experiences of two reporters and their documenting the existence of slavery in the Sudan.This series of articles highlighted for me an outrageous condition in the Sudan that evidently has been often reported by the United Nations, the U.S. Department of State and human rights organizations of slavery in Sudan and Mauritania.As a descendant of a once-enslaved people in the United States, and having information about this unspeakable treatment of Africans by Africans, of humans by humans, I lift my voice in outrage against slavery in the Republic of Sudan and wherever else in Africa it is found.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | June 23, 1996
THE STONY expressions on the faces of Garang Deng Kuot and Akok Deng Kuot were eloquent in their testimony to the toll bondage takes on the human spirit. At an age when the eyes of other boys would show sparks of curiosity at the mission of two foreigners in their midst, these young boys evidently had no emotions to spare.Bought and freed from slavery by two Sun reporters as a way of proving the existence of slavery in Sudan, these Dinka boys were fortunate to be reunited with their family.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | June 23, 1996
THE STONY expressions on the faces of Garang Deng Kuot and Akok Deng Kuot were eloquent in their testimony to the toll bondage takes on the human spirit. At an age when the eyes of other boys would show sparks of curiosity at the mission of two foreigners in their midst, these young boys evidently had no emotions to spare.Bought and freed from slavery by two Sun reporters as a way of proving the existence of slavery in Sudan, these Dinka boys were fortunate to be reunited with their family.
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