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December 11, 1997
Tonight, TV helps pave the way for tomorrow's opening of Steven Spielberg's latest film, "Amistad."On the Discovery Channel, "Slave Ship" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., repeats 1 a.m.-2 a.m.) is a new documentary about the horrors of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. At its center is the 1839 Amistad incident, a shipboard rebellion that is the subject of Spielberg's film. Also examined are the legal battles that followed and the effect of the rebellion on the abolitionist movement.The History Channel follows with another documentary, which Spielberg introduces, called "Ships of Slaves: The Middle Passage" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., repeats 2 a.m.-3 a.m.)
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
Patterson High School became the latest political battleground in the effort to rebuild Baltimore's decrepit school infrastructure this week, with students throwing their support behind a proposed bottle tax that could help raise about $300 million for facility upgrades. The Baltimore Education Coalition led City Council Vice President Edward Reisinger and education advocates from around the city on a tour of Patterson on Thursday, where broken boilers and sweltering, cramped and ill-equipped classrooms offered a glimpse into the district's $2.8 billion list of repairs.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | October 30, 1993
In the end, the message aims to instill dignity, not outrage over pain and suffering. But a new exhibit at the Great Blacks in Wax Museum is a chilling document of the sordid centuries of the African slave trade."
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | February 10, 2008
The Slave Ship A Human History By Marcus Rediker Viking / 434 pages / $27.95 By 1807-1808, when Great Britain and the United States outlawed the slave trade, 9 million people had been transported from Africa to the New World. Three million more would follow. Crammed onto slave ships, more than a million of them died en route, their bodies cast overboard to feed a flotilla of sharks. The rest - the lucky ones - descended into a living hell. A "floating dungeon," the slave ship was their first "home" in captivity.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2005
Simple iron bars that could be used to purchase a human being. Iron shackles clearly designed for a young child's legs. A captain's log that complains of the stifling African heat, but doesn't even mention the cold reality that the ship was dealing in human cargo. Such are the sights and sounds of A Slave Ship Speaks: The Wreck of the Henrietta Marie, a traveling exhibit of artifacts from a sunken slave ship that will welcome visitors to Baltimore's Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture when it opens at Pratt and President streets on June 25. At first blush, the Henrietta Marie seems an unlikely centerpiece for the opening of a museum dedicated to Maryland history.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1996
A group of African-American police officers say they'll send a formal complaint by Monday to Howard County Police Chief James N. Robey over a slave-ship cartoon they called "offensive and insensitive."The officers made the decision yesterday at an emergency meeting called by the members of the Howard County Centurions for Justice, which represents the county's black police officers.The department's Internal Affairs Division is investigating allegations involving the cartoon, the officers said.
NEWS
By Winnie Hu and Winnie Hu,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 20, 2002
NEW YORK - The iron shackles still make him uneasy, but they no longer stir up a maelstrom of hate and fury inside him. Oswald Sykes has come to tolerate the shackles because they serve his purpose: To tell the story of the brutal trans-Atlantic slave trade. For the last decade, Sykes has doggedly called attention to the shackles and other excavated remains of the Henrietta Marie, a 17th-century English slave ship that sank during a storm in the Florida Straits in 1700. Sykes designed an underwater memorial to honor those long-forgotten slaves, and was one of a group of black scuba divers who placed it at the site of the shipwreck in 1993.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | February 10, 2008
The Slave Ship A Human History By Marcus Rediker Viking / 434 pages / $27.95 By 1807-1808, when Great Britain and the United States outlawed the slave trade, 9 million people had been transported from Africa to the New World. Three million more would follow. Crammed onto slave ships, more than a million of them died en route, their bodies cast overboard to feed a flotilla of sharks. The rest - the lucky ones - descended into a living hell. A "floating dungeon," the slave ship was their first "home" in captivity.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | August 14, 1991
A black leader's charge that Annapolis Alderman Ruth C. Gray wanted to turn the old Bates High School into a "slave ship" has drawn an angry response from the Ward 4 Republican, who labeled the remark "malicious, deceptive and inflammatory."The comment came from Jean Creek, head of the county NAACP and the Bates Foundation, which wants senior housing and a community center at the boarded-up school, during a County Council meeting on the project Monday night.Infuriated, Gray is asking the executive boards of the Bates Foundation and the county National Association for the Advancement of Colored People if Creek's remark represents the organizations' views.
NEWS
December 16, 1996
SLAVERY NEVER has been a joking matter in America. For good reason, the topic does not surface in the monologues of Letterman or Leno. Painful histories make it difficult, if not impossible, to reduce topics such as slavery and the Holocaust to humor without stirring deep emotions of pain or rage, especially among people whose heritage connects them with the suffering.Howard County Police Capt. Stephen Drummond, who is white, found humor in a cartoon about a slave ship, but black county police officers are not laughing.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,sun television critic | February 10, 2007
The History Channel rolls the dice this week with USS Constellation: Battling for Freedom -- a look back at one of the proudest chapters in the storied past of the ship that sits in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. The two-hour program takes a huge gamble in its all-out commitment to re-enactments of fully crewed ships at war off the coast of 19th-century Africa, as well as slave traders ravaging inland villages to fill their coastal dungeons with new captives. Get even a few details or camera angles wrong in a sprawling period piece like this, and the illusion can be hopelessly lost.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS TURNER | February 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Learning about America's one-time addiction to slavery is like peeling back layers of a tough white onion. For example, how many know that New Yorkers kept slaves through 1840, or that a fifth of New York City's population in 1776 was slave? Outfitting slave ships was a churning engine of the city's prosperity, according to black historian W.E.B. Du Bois. How many schoolchildren in Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Indiana, Delaware, New Jersey, Ohio and Rhode Island are taught that the federal census of 1840 counted slaves in their states?
NEWS
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2005
Four-year-old Kofi Whitehead had scarcely entered the dim museum room when something caused his eyes to light up with excitement. "Look!" he yelled to his parents while pointing to a painting on a wall. "I see a ship!" Images of the Henrietta Marie slave ship exhibition made the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, which opened in June, come alive for the youngster from Baltimore. Kofi's mother, Kaye, an advanced-placement social studies teacher at West Baltimore Middle School, wasn't about to let her son's curiosity go to waste.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2005
Simple iron bars that could be used to purchase a human being. Iron shackles clearly designed for a young child's legs. A captain's log that complains of the stifling African heat, but doesn't even mention the cold reality that the ship was dealing in human cargo. Such are the sights and sounds of A Slave Ship Speaks: The Wreck of the Henrietta Marie, a traveling exhibit of artifacts from a sunken slave ship that will welcome visitors to Baltimore's Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture when it opens at Pratt and President streets on June 25. At first blush, the Henrietta Marie seems an unlikely centerpiece for the opening of a museum dedicated to Maryland history.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2004
A British organization that re-enacts slavery in period costume and performs street walks with whites and blacks reversing historical roles will make Annapolis its first stop during a U.S. tour Sept. 29 - a prospect getting mixed reviews from some of the Colonial seaport's officials and merchants. Tonight the city council will consider whether to waive city fees for the one-day event, a request made by the local Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Foundation Inc. on behalf of the London-based Lifeline Expedition.
NEWS
By Winnie Hu and Winnie Hu,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 20, 2002
NEW YORK - The iron shackles still make him uneasy, but they no longer stir up a maelstrom of hate and fury inside him. Oswald Sykes has come to tolerate the shackles because they serve his purpose: To tell the story of the brutal trans-Atlantic slave trade. For the last decade, Sykes has doggedly called attention to the shackles and other excavated remains of the Henrietta Marie, a 17th-century English slave ship that sank during a storm in the Florida Straits in 1700. Sykes designed an underwater memorial to honor those long-forgotten slaves, and was one of a group of black scuba divers who placed it at the site of the shipwreck in 1993.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1998
Members of the Howard County branch of the NAACP have asked the school system to reassign an investigator who was accused of displaying a racially offensive cartoon two years ago while employed with the Howard County Police Department.Stephen Drummond, a retired Howard County police captain, is one target in a protest of school policies by the local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. At a school board meeting Thursday night several NAACP members also criticized the school system over hiring of African-Americans.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1997
Annapolis dedicates a new spot at City Dock today for a plaque marking the arrival 230 years ago of author Alex Haley's ancestor Kunta Kinte aboard a slave ship.The ceremony, which starts at 11: 45 a.m., completes the first phase of a project to place a bronze, life-sized statue of the "Roots" author sitting on a bench and telling a story to three children at the City Dock.The event marks 10 years of annual commemorations in the city sponsored by Kunta Kinte Celebrations Inc., which also holds an annual Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival there.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2001
At age 3, Jamila Brown is too young to understand the significance of the Amistad, but that didn't stop her parents, Shirlene and Michael Brown of Columbia, from taking her on a free deck tour yesterday at the Inner Harbor. "We watched the movie, but we wanted to see it and maybe learn a little more about the ship and the history," Shirlene Brown said. "It has been interesting. We'll tell her more when she gets older." A $3.1 million replica of the Amistad - Spanish for "friendship" - is docked at the harbor until Oct. 18, when it will continue its voyage along the East Coast.
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