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Slave Quarters

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By Melvin Durai and Melvin Durai,Contributing Writer | April 24, 1993
For many years, visitors to the Hampton National Historic Site have admired the grand old mansion that forms the centerpiece of the 60-acre national park.Built in the 1780s, the ornate, lavishly furnished structure housed several generations of the Ridgelys, a prominent Maryland family.Tomorrow, for the first time ever, visitors to the Towson park will be able to compare the Ridgelys' affluent lifestyle with the bare existence of their slaves.The park is allowing people to enter or look into the slave quarters, the overseer's house, the outhouses, the family cemetery and several other buildings on the sprawling estate.
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By Diane Brown, dmbrown@comcast.net | December 15, 2011
In the moment it took him to put one foot into the house, with the other foot still outside beyond the storm door, the plumber told me about the slave quarters he had seen in western Howard County. "Oh yeah," he said, raising the right foot from the front step into the hallway, "me and my buddies, we used to go up there to those slave quarters and sit on top of the roof and hunt. It was sumthin'. And they got some of those slave quarters on a bunch of farms all over the county.
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NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson | August 27, 2006
The Columbia Association board of directors has approved $125,000 in additional funds for the restoration of the Woodlawn Slave Quarters. During Thursday's board meeting, the panel unanimously approved the funds for the quarters, adding to $100,000 the association already had allocated. Believed to date to the 1700s, the Woodlawn Slave Quarters is on CA property off Bendix Road. Last year, the association created the Woodlawn Slave Quarters Preservation Task Force to recommend ways to restore the decaying structure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 28, 2011
Perhaps you saw the report on Drudge about "closet-gate,"  which broke this weekend , in which staffers for Vice President Joe Biden constrained a Florida journalist to closet during a fundraiser at a wealthy developer's house. But what you haven't heard about -- until now -- is the 4-minute phone call that preceded that deprivation of freedom. Through our well-placed sources at the White House, we present to you the entire transcript of that phone call between party host Alan Ginsburg and the vice president.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | June 23, 2006
A task force appointed by the Columbia Association believes an additional $125,000 will enable the group to start restoring the Woodlawn Slave Quarters this fall. The crumbling, roofless stone building, which is on Columbia Association open space off Bendix Road, is believed to date to the early 1700s. The homeowners association created the task force in December to recommend a plan for the site and reinforced the fragile structure with wooden supports. At a meeting Wednesday night, the task force decided to request additional money from the Columbia Association to be combined with $100,000 that the association has allocated.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,special to the sun | May 11, 2008
Now that the Columbia Association has rebuilt the partially collapsed, vine-covered remains of the Woodlawn Slave Quarters, advocates for the historic property are faced with a new question. What can they do with it? The Columbia Association has always intended the two-room stone cottage, which stands off Bendix Road on a piece of its open space property, to be an educational resource for the community. Now it is seeking motivated people and new funding to make that happen. Historians say they believe the structure was built in the early 1700s as part of the Woodlawn manor property, making it likely the oldest surviving slave quarters in Howard County.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Sun reporter | December 10, 2006
The Woodlawn Slave Quarters is on track for a restoration in the summer, and members of a task force established by the Columbia Association are looking at what might come next for the site off Bendix Road, where the crumbling stone building is thought to have stood for 300 years. Archaeological research, more public activities and finding more funding were all on the agenda last week as the group reviewed its short- and long-term goals for the property. From its beginning, the task force has aimed to address more than just the building, said Barbara Kellner, a task force member and manager of the Columbia archives.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | April 5, 2006
The Columbia Association is trying to preserve what is believed to be the oldest surviving slave quarters in Howard County - a small stone building that sits off a gravel road in northern Columbia, without a roof and with walls that threaten to fall down. But the Columbia Association is concerned that the efforts by the homeowners association - which owns the site, estimated to date to the early 1700s - may be somewhat complicated by plans to build an office park on nearby land. D. Ronald Brasher is planning to build a 74,000-square-foot office condominium building and parking lots near Woodlawn Manor, a mid-1800s, two-story, stuccoed stone house that is adjacent to the slave quarters.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1999
In a boost to its 2-year-old fund-raising campaign, Hampton National Historic Site recently received $200,000 in National Park Service funding to help restore the farmhouse and slave quarters at the 18th-century plantation in Towson.The money will go toward turning a dilapidated, pre-Revolutionary War farmhouse -- considered to be the oldest home in Baltimore County -- into a multipurpose center and to open one of three slave quarters to the public. The 63-acre site has about 22 buildings, including barns and a dairy.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2001
They'll lose their bucolic setting, but the two old cabins at Mount Joy Farm in Ellicott City that some believe to have been slave quarters won't fall to the wrecking ball. Howard County Planning and Zoning Director Joseph W. Rutter Jr. approved a waiver this week that will make it easier for Winchester Homes, the developer of a subdivision at the farm, to preserve the cabins. The waiver will allow the developer to keep the road alongside the cabins a private way, freeing the developer from setback rules that might have forced the cabins' destruction.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,special to the sun | May 11, 2008
Now that the Columbia Association has rebuilt the partially collapsed, vine-covered remains of the Woodlawn Slave Quarters, advocates for the historic property are faced with a new question. What can they do with it? The Columbia Association has always intended the two-room stone cottage, which stands off Bendix Road on a piece of its open space property, to be an educational resource for the community. Now it is seeking motivated people and new funding to make that happen. Historians say they believe the structure was built in the early 1700s as part of the Woodlawn manor property, making it likely the oldest surviving slave quarters in Howard County.
NEWS
By Tina Marie Macias | September 30, 2007
MOUNT VERNON, Va. -- The homes of the nation's first presidents receive as much care and attention as any historic sites in the nation. Special societies raise money to preserve and protect them. Researchers dote on the finest points of their architecture and family heritage. But until recent years, there was little focus on a painful reality in the history of several of the founding fathers: George Washington, who led the Colonial forces seeking freedom from the British; Thomas Jefferson, whose Declaration of Independence proclaimed the right to "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness"; and James Madison, who wrote the Constitution "in order to ... secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity," all owned slaves.
NEWS
May 13, 2007
Several I-95 ramps to close at night The northbound Interstate 95 ramp to eastbound and westbound Route 175 will be closed this evening as part of the State Highway Administration's $15 million safety and resurfacing project along I-95 between Routes 32 and 100. The ramp will be closed between 9 p.m. and 5 a.m. tomorrow. Other ramps to be closed between 9 p.m. and 5 a.m., weather permitting, are the eastbound Route 175 to northbound I-95 (closed tomorrow and Tuesday); southbound I-95 ramp to eastbound Route 100 (closed Wednesday)
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | April 6, 2007
Workers stood on a scaffold this week and chipped away at the crumbling mortar between the stones in one wall of the Woodlawn Slave Quarters in Columbia. They were preparing to fill the space between the stones with new mortar of the same color and roughly the same strength, the latest in a series of steps to restore the crumbling house. "Our goal is to stabilize the structure and return it to its original [condition] as closely as we can," said Charles E. Grey, project manager for the renovation.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | March 23, 2007
Preservation Howard County is considering 16 locations of historic significance for its seventh annual list of the Top Ten Endangered Sites in the county. In anticipation of a May release, the nonprofit preservation group this week had "very vigorous debate ... on all of the nominated properties," said the group's president, Mary Catherine Cochran. The debate included a thorough discussion about adding to the list two Columbia buildings designed by architect Frank O. Gehry, Cochran said.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Sun reporter | December 10, 2006
The Woodlawn Slave Quarters is on track for a restoration in the summer, and members of a task force established by the Columbia Association are looking at what might come next for the site off Bendix Road, where the crumbling stone building is thought to have stood for 300 years. Archaeological research, more public activities and finding more funding were all on the agenda last week as the group reviewed its short- and long-term goals for the property. From its beginning, the task force has aimed to address more than just the building, said Barbara Kellner, a task force member and manager of the Columbia archives.
NEWS
By Dinitia Smith and Dinitia Smith,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 28, 2002
The National Park Service's plans to showcase the Liberty Bell next year in a new $9 million pavilion in Philadelphia have come under attack from historians and local residents, who have accused the Park Service of trying to cover up a less noble element of American history on the same spot: the existence of slave quarters. The pavilion, to be called the Liberty Bell Center, is part of an ambitious $300 million redesign of Independence National Historic Park. It will be located partly on the former site of the Robert Morris house, where George Washington lived during his presidency and where his slaves slept, ate and worked.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson | August 27, 2006
The Columbia Association board of directors has approved $125,000 in additional funds for the restoration of the Woodlawn Slave Quarters. During Thursday's board meeting, the panel unanimously approved the funds for the quarters, adding to $100,000 the association already had allocated. Believed to date to the 1700s, the Woodlawn Slave Quarters is on CA property off Bendix Road. Last year, the association created the Woodlawn Slave Quarters Preservation Task Force to recommend ways to restore the decaying structure.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | June 23, 2006
A task force appointed by the Columbia Association believes an additional $125,000 will enable the group to start restoring the Woodlawn Slave Quarters this fall. The crumbling, roofless stone building, which is on Columbia Association open space off Bendix Road, is believed to date to the early 1700s. The homeowners association created the task force in December to recommend a plan for the site and reinforced the fragile structure with wooden supports. At a meeting Wednesday night, the task force decided to request additional money from the Columbia Association to be combined with $100,000 that the association has allocated.
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