Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSlave
IN THE NEWS

Slave

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 2, 2010
The National Park Service is marking Black History Month with an exhibit on a 200-year-old "slave village" that archaeologists found at the Monocacy National Battlefield near Frederick. The temporary exhibit opened Monday at the park visitor center and will be up through the end of the month. Spokeswoman Tracy Shives says the exhibit uses written materials and artifacts such as buttons and pottery pieces to explain how the community of up to 90 slaves was uncovered and how they lived. - Associated Press div.talkforum #creditfooter { display: none; }
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
Archaeologist Julie Schablitsky has stared at many relics unearthed from Maryland's landscape. Rarely, she says, has one stared back. But that happened Friday at a sprawling farm in rural Charles County that holds the graves of 23 people who are believed to have been slaves who lived in the late 1700s and early 1800s. The likeness of one man was digitally re-created by a Baltimore County forensic artist. "I cried, because I'm not used to them looking back at me," said Schablitsky, chief archaeologist for the State Highway Administration, the lead agency in a project to research the graves.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 24, 2013
The film surprises you with vast silences. It is an emptiness that at first seems jarring to sensibilities trained to believe every moment must be crammed. By contrast, this movie takes you into moments of pregnant stillness: no movement on the screen, no dialogue, no swelling music to cue your emotions. At one point, the camera takes what feels like a minute to study Solomon Northup's face as he absorbs the awfulness of his predicament. He does nothing. He says nothing. He simply is. It is silence as respite, silence that gives you room to contemplate and feel.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 6, 2014
A plea for about a dozen people who know who they are: Will you see "12 Years a Slave" now? It just won the Oscar for Best Picture. It just came out on DVD. Please see it. I'll even spring for the popcorn. You see, I keep encountering folks, mostly African-American, who have decided that they won't -- or can't -- see this movie. Some say they don't want to be made angry. Others say they don't want to be traumatized. I don't blame them for respecting the power of this film.
NEWS
By Nicholas Wade and Nicholas Wade,New York Times News Service | August 19, 1999
Did George Washington father a son with Venus, a young slave who lived on the estate of his brother, John Augustine Washington? Three descendants of Venus' son, who was called West Ford, say that according to a family tradition two centuries old, George Washington was West Ford's father. They hope to develop DNA evidence from Washington family descendants and his hair samples to bolster their case. Historians so far are skeptical, saying there is no documentary evidence to suggest that Washington ever met Venus, whose son was born four or five years before he became president, and several reasons to consider any such liaison improbable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 18, 1994
The lost voices of America belong to slaves. Of course in their time, no historians bothered with them because the prevailing theory held that history was made by generals and presidents. When the absurdity of this position became clear it was essentially too late, though a number of after-the-fact slave memoirs have been uncovered.Popular culture has fared no better in redressing this grievance. Too many examinations of slavery have turned out to be "Mandingo"-like pap hellbent on exploiting the sexual tensions implicit in institutionalized domination.
FEATURES
February 2, 2007
Harriet Tubman 1820-1913 For her freedom was like heaven Harriet Tubman, born a slave on a plantation in Dorchester County, was 29 years old when she seized the opportunity to escape to freedom in the north. The year was 1849 and as she stood on a hill in Pennsylvania, a free woman for the first time in her life, her thoughts raced. "I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person," recalled the woman who came to be called the "Moses" of her people. "There was such a glory over everything.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | November 17, 2009
A bronze plaque honoring slave Dred Scott and his wife Harriet will be unveiled at ceremonies today in front of Frederick's City Hall. The plaque and granite pedestal is adjacent to an older monument to Roger Brooke Taney, the U.S. Supreme Court chief justice who lived in Frederick and whose controversial decision in the Dred Scott case of 1856 said that slaves had no rights under the U.S. Constitution. Historians have noted that the Dred Scott Decision put an end to the Missouri Compromise, which allowed slavery in some states and prohibited it in others, and exacerbated the divisions between the North and the South.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 1998
Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence and third president of the fledgling United States, almost certainly fathered a child with a slave at his Monticello plantation, scientists who analyzed genetic material collected from his living descendants have concluded.The new evidence, made public yesterday, sheds the first reliable scientific light on an unusually emotional controversy over paternity that has simmered for almost two centuries.The matter of Jefferson's long relationship with a mixed-race slave named Sally Hemings is of more than scholarly interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
Mozart never finished "Zaide," a music-theater piece with spoken dialogue. What has come down to us is a colorful, rather dark story about a sultan named Soliman, who loves his slave Zaide, who loves fellow slave Gomatz. With the help of Allazim, a high-ranking slave, Zaide and Gomatz escape, only to be captured and threatened with death. At that point, the story ends. Wolf Trap Opera's presentation allows the audience to vote at intermission for one of three possibilities — happy, happier and downer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Though he was a man of the cloth, Charles Turner Torrey went out of his way to publicly mock his enemies and alienate his ever-dwindling supply of friends. He was always short of money. He abandoned - or at least, severely neglected - his wife and two children. During a celebrated court case in the 1840s, he was described as "the most hated man in Maryland. " But a new book makes the case that the difficult, driven minister was one of the greatest abolitionists in U.S. history, although almost no one today knows his name.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 9, 2013
After you heard President Obama's call for a hike in the minimum wage, you probably wondered the same thing I did: Was Obama sent from the future by Skynet to prepare humanity for its ultimate dominion by robots? But just in case the question didn't occur to you, let me explain. On Tuesday, the day before Obama called for an increase in the minimum wage, the restaurant chain Applebee's announced that it will install iPad-like tablets at every table. Chili's already made this move earlier this year.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 24, 2013
The film surprises you with vast silences. It is an emptiness that at first seems jarring to sensibilities trained to believe every moment must be crammed. By contrast, this movie takes you into moments of pregnant stillness: no movement on the screen, no dialogue, no swelling music to cue your emotions. At one point, the camera takes what feels like a minute to study Solomon Northup's face as he absorbs the awfulness of his predicament. He does nothing. He says nothing. He simply is. It is silence as respite, silence that gives you room to contemplate and feel.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
Media mogul Russell Simmons might have apologized for posting a controversial parody video on his YouTube channel that's become known as "The Harriet Tubman Sex Tapes. " But, the famed abolitionist's great-great-great grandniece isn't even close to forgiving him. In a two-paged open letter to Simmons that was emailed to a reporter at The Baltimore Sun, the artist Tina Martin Wyatt verges on accusing the entertainer of being a race traitor. "Your parody of Aunt Harriet is not unlike parodies of African Americans by racist individuals in this country and others abroad," Wyatt writes.
NEWS
March 3, 2013
Aspects of recent debates about the value of a liberal arts education, its usefulness and its appropriateness strike a familiar and disturbing historical chord. Our nation's brightest students, contemplating the dedication of four years to the highest level of cognitive challenge, are discouraged by a contingent of their elders and asked to consider something more practical. "A liberal education won't prepare you for a job," the student is told. "What can you do with a degree in philosophy?
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, Towson Times | June 20, 2012
Officials at the Hampton National Historic Site in Towson this week officially changed the name of a black history program planned for next month after controversy erupted over its original title - "Slave for a Day. " The July 8 event, which park ranger and event organizer Angela Roberts-Burton said is part of the historical site's monthly black history educational series, caused a stir on the Internet for what some believe was insensitive wording....
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 1, 1991
Frederick Douglass, the slave who became an abolitionist leader, and Harriet Tubman, the slave who led 300 others to freedom, are two of this state's most heroic natives. Born in bondage on the Eastern Shore, they had to escape Maryland in order to embrace their illustrious careers. But they're back now in triumph, in "Jacob Lawrence: The Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman Series of 1938-40" at the Baltimore Museum of Art.Painter Jacob Lawrence was born in Atlantic City, N.J., in 1917, but from 1930 lived in Harlem, in the shadow of the Harlem renaissance, and became interested both in art and in African-American history.
NEWS
By Rev. Robert A. F. Turner | May 10, 1998
IN 1857, Supreme Court Justice Roger Taney, speaking for the majority in the Dred Scott case, wrote, "[Blacks] had no rights which the white man was bound to respect."All of America's people have come on a long and very painful journey of progress since that time. However, for African-Americans, echoes of that past remain as does an unfinished struggle to rescue and reconstruct our history and reaffirm and reclaim aspects of our culture, both in America and on the African continent, that were prohibited, lost and stolen.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
Baltimore mega-church pastor Jamal Bryant had fashion on his mind Monday, first condemning "Slave Adidas" and then saying sunglasses have no place in church. Bryant, pastor of Empowerment Temple and also an increasing player on the national scene, often at the side of Trayvon Martin's parents, is an avid Tweeter with a following of nearly 100,000 people. He had nothing good to say about the controversial shoes known as "slave Adidas," suede athletic shoes with plastic shackles that clamp onto the shin like an accessory.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
A Parkville couple accused of treating a 15-year-old girl from North Carolina as their personal sex "slave" and filming and distributing videos online of their sexual interactions with her have each been indicted on more than a dozen state and federal sex abuse charges. The federal indictment, made this month, includes charges of producing and distributing child pornography, and transporting the girl across state lines for sexual reasons. John Andrew Blaes, 48, and Margaret Ellen Jones, 36, met online in 2010 and "became involved in a sexual relationship involving bondage, discipline, sadism, and masochism," according to the federal indictment, filed May 9. Shortly after, Jones moved into Blaes' home in the 8600 block of Wendell Ave. in Parkville.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.