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NEWS
July 30, 2005
On Thursday, July 28, 2005, MURRAY SLATKIN, beloved husband of the late Lillian Slatkin (nee Selsky); loving father of Joan Barton and Robert Slatkin, both of Baltimore; devoted father-in-law of Eva Slatkin; loving grandfather of Mathew and Rivka Slatkin, Nicholas Slatkin and James "Jimmy" Slatkin; dear great-grandfather of Shayna and Yosef Slatkin. Services at SOL LEVINSON AND BROS INC, 8900 Reisterstown Rd, at Mt Wilson Lane, on Sunday, July 31 at 11 A.M. Interment Har Sinai Congregation Cemetery, Garrison Forest Rd. Please omit flowers, contributions may be directed, in his name, to the Charity of your choice.
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NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 7, 2008
Leonard Slatkin returned this week to guest-conduct the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's for the first time in 15 years and brought with him an eclectic bag of repertoire. The result is that he kills two birds with one-half a program - Rossini's Thieving Magpie Overture and, via a piece composed by Slatkin himself, The Raven - and spends the remainder in the earthy realm of the Symphony No. 2 by Sibelius. That well-worn Sibelius score provided the most rewards last night at the Music Center at Strathmore.
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FEATURES
By Aron Davidowitz and Aron Davidowitz,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2003
National Symphony Orchestra music director Leonard Slatkin was among 10 arts professionals awarded the National Medal of Arts yesterday. Others include country singer George Strait, childrens' author Beverly Cleary, dancer Suzanne Farrell, choreographer Tommy Tune and director Ron Howard. Considered the government's major honor in the arts, the medal goes to U.S. individuals or groups making outstanding contributions to the enhancement and growth of the arts. "The arts are an invaluable source of this country's vast creative output.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 1, 2008
Leonard Slatkin bowed out in trademark style Sunday night, ending his 12-year tenure as music director of the National Symphony Orchestra with an entertaining program that reflected his wide-ranging tastes and skills. Greeted by a standing ovation when he first walked onto the Kennedy Center Concert Hall stage, as he had been last Thursday for the final subscription concert of the NSO season, the conductor launched quickly into what was billed as a "Salute to Slatkin." Actually, there wasn't that much saluting.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 1, 2008
Leonard Slatkin bowed out in trademark style Sunday night, ending his 12-year tenure as music director of the National Symphony Orchestra with an entertaining program that reflected his wide-ranging tastes and skills. Greeted by a standing ovation when he first walked onto the Kennedy Center Concert Hall stage, as he had been last Thursday for the final subscription concert of the NSO season, the conductor launched quickly into what was billed as a "Salute to Slatkin." Actually, there wasn't that much saluting.
NEWS
August 3, 2005
Murray Slatkin, who owned a wholesale painting products supply company and was active in Zionist organizations, died of an aneurysm Thursday at Sinai Hospital. The Stevenson resident was 100. Born in New York City, he moved to Baltimore in 1908 with his parents and lived on Ducatel Street. He graduated from City College in 1921, at age 16, and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the Johns Hopkins University and a law degree from the University of Maryland in 1929. He joined his father's business, Felmor Chemical Works, later Felmor Corp.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 29, 1994
Leonard Slatkin was named yesterday as the new music director of Washington's National Symphony Orchestra, replacing Mstislav Rostropovich, whose resignation as the National's music director becomes effective at the end of the current season.Slatkin joins the NSO next season as its music director-designate, taking on full duties as music director at the end of the 1995-96 season, when his current term as music director of the St. Louis Symphony expires.Slatkin had been a prominent candidate to succeed Rostropovich since the Russian-born cellist-conductor announced his resignation two years ago. It was scarcely a secret the Kennedy Center, which runs the NSO, wanted to hire an American-born music director with a wider repertory than Rostropovich, and better skills in refining the way an orchestra plays.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith ... and Tim Smith ...,Sun Music Critic | January 22, 2008
A significant era is winding down in Washington, where Leonard Slatkin's dozen-year tenure as music director of the National Symphony Orchestra will end in June. He has fortified the ensemble, made it more versatile and flexible than it was when his predecessor, Mstislav Rostropovich, had the reins. He has enlivened the music scene with unexpected repertoire and festivals. Not that you would necessarily gather any of this from perusing some of the local media coverage. Many concert reviews and commentary pieces Slatkin generates read more like multicount felony indictments from an over-eager district attorney's office.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 28, 2004
I have some really nice friends," Leonard Slatkin said. Pretty talented, too. Fifteen of them - from Emanuel Ax to Pinchas Zukerman - joined the National Symphony Orchestra to celebrate Slatkin's 60th birthday in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall Sunday night. A lively party, at the very least. Entering his ninth season as NSO music director, Slatkin is worth celebrating for several reasons beyond the age milestone (actually reached on Sept. 1). He has steadily upgraded the orchestra and boldly expanded its repertoire, while building a strong bond with the public.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 7, 2008
Leonard Slatkin returned this week to guest-conduct the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's for the first time in 15 years and brought with him an eclectic bag of repertoire. The result is that he kills two birds with one-half a program - Rossini's Thieving Magpie Overture and, via a piece composed by Slatkin himself, The Raven - and spends the remainder in the earthy realm of the Symphony No. 2 by Sibelius. That well-worn Sibelius score provided the most rewards last night at the Music Center at Strathmore.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | June 23, 2008
On a shelf in Leonard Slatkin's office at the Kennedy Center sit three of his half-dozen Grammy Awards, alongside photographs of him receiving honors from the two presidents whose terms coincided with his own as music director of the National Symphony Orchestra. That tenure ends this month after 12 eventful seasons. "I think I did a lot," Slatkin says, in between sips of a soda. "Not as much as I would have liked, but a lot." If those accomplishments had to be summed up in a single sentence, it might be: He put the "national" in the National Symphony.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 10, 2008
David Del Tredici took his first musical trip "down the rabbit hole" in 1968, and didn't emerge fully again for another 27 years, only after composing eight substantial pieces based on Lewis Carroll's enduring classic of inspired nonsense, Alice in Wonderland. It would be hard to find a more "curiouser" case in music history. It's not that Del Tredici didn't produce other things over that time span, or since -- among the 71-year-old composer's recent works is Rip Van Winkle, premiered by the National Symphony Orchestra in 2005.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith ... and Tim Smith ...,Sun Music Critic | January 22, 2008
A significant era is winding down in Washington, where Leonard Slatkin's dozen-year tenure as music director of the National Symphony Orchestra will end in June. He has fortified the ensemble, made it more versatile and flexible than it was when his predecessor, Mstislav Rostropovich, had the reins. He has enlivened the music scene with unexpected repertoire and festivals. Not that you would necessarily gather any of this from perusing some of the local media coverage. Many concert reviews and commentary pieces Slatkin generates read more like multicount felony indictments from an over-eager district attorney's office.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | September 18, 2007
For its entry in the gala pre-season, the National Symphony Orchestra offered a starry, entertaining event Sunday night at the Kennedy Center that drew plenty of dressy Washington elite, along with just plain old music-loving folk, and raised a record $2.2 million. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's gala the night before (which took in $900,000) had nearly as glittery-looking a turnout, and may have had a slight edge in the celebrity count, what with present and former senators, a former governor and director John Waters among the crowd.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | June 12, 2007
The National Symphony Orchestra wrapped up its 2006-2007 season with a concert that found both the ensemble and its music director, Leonard Slatkin, at the top of their game. As usual, Slatkin came up with a deft mix of repertoire - symphonies by Haydn (we could never get too much Haydn around here) and Mahler surrounded a premiere by American composer Mark Adamo. The latter's Four Angels, a concerto for harp and orchestra, was commissioned by the NSO for its longtime harpist, Dotian Levalier.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 26, 2006
When it comes to gala season-openers, the National Symphony Orchestra knows how to deliver. The annual tradition comes complete with a grand ball for Washington's well-heeled and well-positioned, but it lets just plain, non-black-tie folks in on the action at ordinary prices during a concert beforehand. To get the 2006-2007 season officially rolling, the NSO packed them into the Kennedy Center Concert Hall on Sunday night for what might have been a ho-hum all-Tchaikovsky program. It was hardly that.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | September 23, 2005
The National Symphony Orchestra played the first subscription concert of its 75th anniversary season Wednesday night at the Kennedy Center sounding downright youthful - in the best sense. A fresh, eager quality in the playing enlivened a chestnut-heavy program potently conducted by Leonard Slatkin, now in his 10th year with the NSO. From the hushed, expectant opening of Weber's Oberon Overture, the conductor's knack for revealing subtleties of instrumental coloring and creating rich atmosphere paid off handsomely.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | September 12, 1996
A new era may begin at 8: 30 tonight at the Kennedy Center when Leonard Slatkin conducts his first concert as the National Symphony's new music director.Slatkin has long been considered one of the bright lights among American-born and -trained conductors. He's a great orchestra builder -- the evidence is the superb orchestra he created in St. Louis during his 17-year tenure there -- and he's the right man for the NSO, which has always been less than the sum of its excellent parts.Slatkin's right for Washington in at least one other respect: The orchestra of the nation's capital now has a music director who conducts the music of his native country with genuine flair -- something sure to be reflected by tonight's all-American program of works by Leonard Bernstein, Samuel Barber, Howard Hanson, David Baker and Duke Ellington.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | September 23, 2005
The National Symphony Orchestra played the first subscription concert of its 75th anniversary season Wednesday night at the Kennedy Center sounding downright youthful - in the best sense. A fresh, eager quality in the playing enlivened a chestnut-heavy program potently conducted by Leonard Slatkin, now in his 10th year with the NSO. From the hushed, expectant opening of Weber's Oberon Overture, the conductor's knack for revealing subtleties of instrumental coloring and creating rich atmosphere paid off handsomely.
NEWS
August 3, 2005
Murray Slatkin, who owned a wholesale painting products supply company and was active in Zionist organizations, died of an aneurysm Thursday at Sinai Hospital. The Stevenson resident was 100. Born in New York City, he moved to Baltimore in 1908 with his parents and lived on Ducatel Street. He graduated from City College in 1921, at age 16, and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the Johns Hopkins University and a law degree from the University of Maryland in 1929. He joined his father's business, Felmor Chemical Works, later Felmor Corp.
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