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By Steve McKerrow | January 31, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:TO THE MOON! -- Mark Linn-Baker and Bronson Pinchot of ABC's "Perfect Strangers" are the best slapstick comedy duo on current series television. And on Friday's episode (at 9 p.m., Channel 13), they fondly adopt the guise of one of early TV's funniest pairs, Jackie Gleason and Art Carney of "The Honeymooners." Note there is nothing wrong with your set; the episode was shot in black and white.STILL COUNTING -- Speaking of early TV, George Burns was hardly a young man when he began playing in "The Burns and Allen Show," back in 1950.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
The boy who never grew up, but learned how to fly, has fascinated children - and adults who still remember being young - since he first soared above a London stage in a hit play by J.M. Barrie in 1904. More than a century later, audiences can have fun learning how that boy turned into Peter Pan, thanks to another hit play, this one landing in Baltimore on Tuesday to start a two-week engagement at the Hippodrome . "Peter and the Starcatcher," which earned a slew of Tony Awards after its 2012 Broadway run, is an eventful show loaded with humor and heart, not to mention surprise.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney and Josh Mooney,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 23, 1991
HOME ALONEFoxVideo$24.98This surprise hit of last Christmas is the reason you'll be seeing so many comedies on screen in the weeks and months to come (Hollywood likes to replicate the latest mega-hit). Without the benefit of major stars, producer/writer John Hughes and director Chris Columbus turned Mr. Hughes' 17th screenplay into the third-largest grossing film in American box-office history, thereby silencing critics who had suggested that Mr. Hughes had run out hits.The film is essentially a big, colorful, loud "Three Stooges" episode, minus one Stooge, and plus the enjoyable screen presence of young Macauley Culkin.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
Mrs. Whitaker, the horrific head of a declining upper-class English household in Noel Coward's 1924 play Easy Virtue, snorts that the name of her new daughter-in-law, Larita, the archetypal woman with a past, is "excellent for musical comedy." The director of the new movie version, Stephan Elliott, who also co-wrote the script with Sheridan Jobbins, has taken that line as his clue for how to pep up Coward's musty period piece. He's made a movie full of audiovisual japery, including a soundtrack laced with Coward and Cole Porter songs and tunes such as "Sex Bomb" and "Car Wash" done in faux-Roaring Twenties style.
NEWS
March 11, 2001
The Carroll County Tourism Council and the Harlem Wizards have teamed up for the fourth consecutive year for a madcap basketball game at 7 p.m. Saturday at Western Maryland College. The game pits the Wizards, including former NBA and college stars, against a gang of local personalities who will be targets for on- and off-court pranks. Even the audience is involved throughout the game. "We are delighted that Adelphia [Communications Corp.] has joined our team [as a sponsor]," said Nancy McCormick, Tourism Council president.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 19, 1999
"Brevity is the soul of wit," Polonius says in "Hamlet," the Shakespearean tragedy that serves as the play within a play in Elaine Beardsley's pseudo-Elizabethan comedy, "For Love of Art." And indeed, this 75-minute Baltimore Playwrights Festival offering, produced by the newly formed Baltimore StreetPlayers, does have brevity to its credit.But for the most part, "For Love of Art" is a comedy lacking in wit. Part of the problem is a confusing script. The plot focuses on a down-at-the-heels theater troupe that hopes to perform for the queen.
FEATURES
September 21, 2007
ONLINE Michael Sragow rates Good Luck Chuck an F, calling it "a comedy about breasts made by boobs." What's your take on Dane Cook and Jessica Alba's slapstick romance? Join the discussion today and every Friday at baltimoresun.com/criticalmass
FEATURES
June 23, 2006
Click Rating: -- PG-13 What it's about -- Overworked, stressed dad buys a remote control that makes the world stop, so he can catch up. Or fast-foward through the annoying things in life. The Kid Attractor Factor -- Adam Sandler and his brand of slapstick comedy. Good lessons/bad lessons -- "You're born. You live. You die." Don't let work rob you of the "you live" part. Violence -- Slapstick punches, knees to the groin. Language -- Vulgar enough to push the PG-13 envelope. Sex -- Yes, simulated in silhouette, with dogs having their way with stuffed toys, too. Drugs -- A gratuitous kiddie "crack" joke.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | November 11, 2007
KILLER OF SHEEP The Charles Burnett Collection SHREK THE THIRD Paramount Home Video, Dreamworks / 29.99 Next to The Bourne Ultimatum, this summer's most satisfying three-peat, Shrek the Third, comes to DVD in all its slapstick glory. The best special feature is film of animators pitching sequences like a cross between silent clowns and standup comedians.michael.sragow@baltsun.com
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | February 8, 2008
Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins imagines slapstick farce as feel-good dramedy, which is to say, it's an unhappy (and largely unfunny) marriage of two movie types that don't really go together. Imagine a Three Stooges short with a feel-good ending, and you get the idea. As slapstick farce, it has a few moments, most of them thanks to either Mike Epps or Baltimore's own Mo'Nique, who ought to take out a patent on her sassy big-girl shtick. Epps, who has made a career out of playing the fast-talking, shiftless best bud, always getting into trouble and barely getting out, frequently suffers from overexposure in his film roles.
NEWS
May 8, 2009
X-Men Origins: Wolverine ** 1/2 ( 2 1/2 STARS) $85 million $85 million 1 week Rated: PG-13 Running time: 107 minutes What it's about: How James Howlett became Logan, aka Wolverine (Hugh Jackman, above), the brother of Victor Creed, aka Sabretooth (Liev Schrieber). Our take: It's like an improbable six-stage rocket that keeps firing according to plan but never achieves lift-off. Ghost of Girlfriends Past No stars $15.4 million $15.4 million 1 week Rated: PG-13 Running time: 100 minutes What it's about: Three spirits guide a glib lothario (Matthew McConaughey, above)
NEWS
May 1, 2009
Obsessed ** (2 STARS) $28.6 million $28.6 million 1 week Rated: PG-13 Running time: 105 minutes What it's about: A second-rate Fatal Attraction knockoff with more diverse casting. Our take: Beyonce Knowles (above) literally and figuratively kicks butt, making up for some of the film's inherent predictability. 17 Again * 1/2 ( 1 1/2 STARS) $11.5 million $39.8 million 2 weeks Rated: PG-13 Running time: 102 minutes What it's about: A disillusioned 30-something gets more than he bargained for when he wishes he were 17 again.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | February 8, 2008
Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins imagines slapstick farce as feel-good dramedy, which is to say, it's an unhappy (and largely unfunny) marriage of two movie types that don't really go together. Imagine a Three Stooges short with a feel-good ending, and you get the idea. As slapstick farce, it has a few moments, most of them thanks to either Mike Epps or Baltimore's own Mo'Nique, who ought to take out a patent on her sassy big-girl shtick. Epps, who has made a career out of playing the fast-talking, shiftless best bud, always getting into trouble and barely getting out, frequently suffers from overexposure in his film roles.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | November 11, 2007
KILLER OF SHEEP The Charles Burnett Collection SHREK THE THIRD Paramount Home Video, Dreamworks / 29.99 Next to The Bourne Ultimatum, this summer's most satisfying three-peat, Shrek the Third, comes to DVD in all its slapstick glory. The best special feature is film of animators pitching sequences like a cross between silent clowns and standup comedians.michael.sragow@baltsun.com
FEATURES
September 21, 2007
ONLINE Michael Sragow rates Good Luck Chuck an F, calling it "a comedy about breasts made by boobs." What's your take on Dane Cook and Jessica Alba's slapstick romance? Join the discussion today and every Friday at baltimoresun.com/criticalmass
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | May 4, 2007
Photos by Bud Johnsonspecial to the sun Colonial Players subscribes to the showbiz adage "leave 'em laughing" as the company on East Street closes this season with Moon Over Buffalo. Tony-award winner Ken Ludwig set his comedy in 1953 in Buffalo's Erlanger Theatre, where nearly-washed-up actors George and Charlotte Hay are performing an alternating schedule of Cyrano de Bergerac and Private Lives. The couple learns that legendary film director Frank Capra is coming to Buffalo to catch their performance and perhaps offer George a job. George may miss his last chance at stardom because he has a drinking problem.
NEWS
January 22, 1993
The Annapolis Dinner Theater, dark for six months, has reopened to feature a variety of shows.On stage will be everything from comedy shows to Broadway-style musicals, all brought to the building, by U.S. 50 between Annapolis and the Bay Bridge, on contracts."
FEATURES
November 3, 2006
Rating -- PG What it's about -- Spoiled pet rat is flushed into London's Sewer World and falls into a daring adventure. The Kid Attractor Factor -- It's animated. Good lessons/bad lessons -- You're not living unless somebody depends on you. Violence -- Slapstick. Language -- One big toilet joke. Not that dirty, though. Sex -- None. Drugs -- None. Parents advisory -- Perfectly appropriate for all ages. Borat Rating -- R What it's about -- Clueless Kazakhstani newsman comes to America and has many misadventures, mocking both his culture and ours.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 6, 2006
Slickness can turn anything into formula - even eccentricity, in the case of the handsome and entirely unfunny British farce Keeping Mum. The script by American novelist Richard Russo and the film's director, Niall Johnson, rests on the idea that murder performed with discretion can remedy all sorts of household woes. And I do mean "rests." The movie is a premise in search of a comedy. Rather than flesh it out, the filmmakers put familiar glad rags on the skull and bones. Even the casting is too on the nose.
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